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Should I seperate my seating and crimping?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by SC_Dave, Nov 11, 2012.


  1. SC_Dave

    SC_Dave
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    I am loading 9mm on a LnL AP. Should I seperate the seating and crimping step which is done with one die now? As you know the press has 5 stations and I will be using a LOD so this means I will have to get the PTX expander I believe. If I seperate the seat and crimp step would it be better to get a seat die and a crimp die or can I use the combination die I have now to crimp only by backing off the seating stem and purchase only a seat die.

    Hope this make sense.
    David
     

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  2. Taterhead

    Taterhead
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    Counting Beans

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    You did not mention your bullet type(s). If loading with soft plated bullets like Rainier or Berry's, separate steps for seating and crimping in separate steps is essential. Bullets with traditional jackets work fine with seating and crimping in one step -- as long as you do not put too much of an aggressive taper.

    I have little experience loading cast bullets so others on the page would have a more informed opinion about that than I would.

    You can use the die that you have now for seating or crimping and purchase another die for the other step should you decide to go with separate steps.
     

  3. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel
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    Whatever you decide.....get the crimp die I stead of two seating dies.
     
  4. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan
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    I highly recommend a separate taper crimp die.

    Richard
     
  5. unclebob

    unclebob
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    :agree:
     
  6. fredj338

    fredj338
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    I like to seat & crimp in separate steps. Mostly because I shoot lead & trying to go all at once can cause shaving, but also hepful for soft plated bullets as well. SInce I do most of my handgun loading on a progressive, it's just adding another die. Simply adding another seating diw with the stem removed is fine. The LFCD should be avoided IMO, just a poor tool for the job.
     
  7. Three-Five-Seven

    Three-Five-Seven
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    I've found it depends on:

    1. The type of bullet one is using

    2. The thickness of the brass one is using

    3. The qualities of the seating/crimping die one is using

    So, my answer is "maybe"
     
  8. SC_Dave

    SC_Dave
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    Thanks guys, I will be using FMJ bullets so maybe my combination die will be ok?
     
  9. F106 Fan

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    The fact that you CAN use a combination die is not a good reason for doing so.

    Life is much simpler when you have a separate taper crimp die. Among other things, you can adjust the crimp without upsetting the OAL.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/find?userSearchQuery=lee+taper+crimp+die

    They're only about $12

    There's a reason the taper crimp die was invented. It probably came about because it improved the process. If it didn't improve the process, no cheap reloaders would have ever bought one. Yet nearly every reloader with a progressive press is using a taper crimp die.

    Richard
     
    #9 F106 Fan, Nov 12, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2012
  10. Agent6-3/8

    Agent6-3/8
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    I load on a single stage press and use Lee carbide dies for all if my pistol loading. I seat and crimp in one step. I've loaded thousands of rounds in a variety of calibers with a variety of bullets and have never had a problem. My handloads function as expected and shoot where I aim them. For me, I don't see the point in adding another step to the process.

    YMMV


    Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     
  11. F106 Fan

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    If I was loading on a single stage press, neither would I. However, the OP is setting up a progressive press and has a station for taper crimp. It's simply a matter of buying the die.

    Richard
     
  12. smokin762

    smokin762
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    I don’t mean to hijack the thread.

    I am new to reloading. I have a Dillon 650 Press. I replaced my Crimp Die with a Lee Factory Crimp Die. I was told it would be better.

    Which Die should I be using for .45 ACP, a Factory Crimp Die or a Taper Crimp Die? Or is this just a preference thing? So far, I haven’t had any issues. :dunno:

    I plan on reloading, FMJ, HP, Copper Plated Lead and Lead bullets.
     
    #12 smokin762, Nov 12, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  13. F106 Fan

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    Around here there is no love for the pistol version of the Lee FCD. I would highly recommend a taper crimp die. Of course, I would also recommend Dillon dies but, frankly, the Lee Taper Crimp Die should work just as well. And it's a lot cheaper.

    The Lee FCD does get some respect for crimping rifle loads. I use one on .223 for my AR-15 and it works quite well. But the rifle die is a whole different animal than the pistol die.

    Richard
     
    #13 F106 Fan, Nov 12, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  14. smokin762

    smokin762
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    Is there something I should watch for with the FCD for pistol? I am too new to understand what the problem is.
     
  15. countrygun

    countrygun
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    IME I like the FCD for revolver loads that may be used ina variety of guns, but for autos a seperate TCD is the way to go. It is easier to get consistent headspacing that way. JMOYMMV
     
  16. F106 Fan

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    The FCD attempts to resize a loaded round after it has been assembled. Among other things, this can resize the bullet diameter and that won't improve its seal with the barrel.

    It can also cause a loss of neck tension which isn't usually a good thing. Bullet setback is one possibility.

    For those of us who use lead bullets, we know the bullet is 0.001" oversized. We paid extra for that! The larger diameter is necessary for getting a seal against the barrel. The last thing we want is to resize the loaded round.

    Everybody must make their own decisions about this reloading thing. I see no reason to change my process; my loads have been working fine since the early '80s.

    Richard
     
  17. smokin762

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    Thank you for the information. :wavey:

    Since I am new and need plenty of practice, I have been measuring the heck out of every loaded round.

    I’ll keep an eye out for this to make sure everything is okay. If I start to have problems, I’ll replace it with the original Die that I bought from Dillon when I bought the Press.
     
  18. F106 Fan

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    A case gauge and a pair of calipers is all that is needed. Some people like to check the loaded rounds in the chamber of their gun but if you have several guns of the same caliber, which one do you use?

    If I was going to a match, I would have already checked samples with a case gauge but I too would run every round into the chamber of the gun I was going to use.

    Richard
     
  19. shotgunred

    shotgunred
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    If jack were still posting he probably tell you how he has been doing both with the same die for the last fifty years. I have used one die and two dies. I personally prefer two dies. But really you can do it any way you want. It is just a little bit easier to set up using two dies.
     
  20. GUNS N' HOGS

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    IMO, using a seperate die for seating and crimping has always produced more consistancy in COL with the XL650. My Son and I are currently using the Redding Competition Seating die along with the Dillon taper crimp for all competition/practice loads.

    This combo has also produced excellent crimping since we definitely don't want any bullet setback while using N320 and Titegroup powders.

    You'll love the XL650 once you learn all it features and specific settings. Excellent machine!

    :cheers: