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Shipping container as an underground shelter

Discussion in 'Survival/Preparedness Forum' started by RMTactical, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. RMTactical

    RMTactical www.AR15pro.net CLM

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    Behind an AR-15
    Sorry if this has already been posted. Just stumbled on it.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3EAJex1RVo&feature=g-vrec&context=G2350e29RVAAAAAAAAAg"]Shipping Container As An Underground Shelter - YouTube[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012
  2. TN.Frank

    TN.Frank Glock4Life

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    Sounds like someone has been watchin' "Doomsday Peppers" on NGC,LOL. The guy in AZ. that shot his thumb off was going to do that very thing. Heck, I'd like to rig one up for a Tornado Shelter once we move. Seems like it'd work well enough if you set it up right.
     


  3. RMTactical

    RMTactical www.AR15pro.net CLM

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    Behind an AR-15
    Havent seen it actually. However, this guy just uses it for a wine cellar.
     
  4. Raiden

    Raiden C&R Fun!

    Shipping containers - unless you have some kind of special source and equipment move 'em - strike me as too expensive for the purpose compared to other framing materials (corrugated metal, wood, blocks, etc.). Or, have they recently gone down in price?
     
  5. TN.Frank

    TN.Frank Glock4Life

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    There suppose to be around $2500 bucks each. I don't know if you could build an all steel 10'x40' structure for that now days. Still, if you're going to bury them you'll need to have a tube with a hatch put into the top and also have to have a couple air vents. Also, a secondary way out wouldn't be a bad idea in case the main entrance/exit gets blocked.
     
  6. RED64CJ5

    RED64CJ5

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    Nice project, but way overkill for a wine cellar.
     
  7. Rumbler_G20

    Rumbler_G20

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    Ummmm, I'd like to share a little been there done that.

    I know for sure that straight burying a 40' container will result in the ultimate collapse of the ceiling and/or walls. You gotta put some reenforcing for the container in there.


    And that is Florida experience where the backfill is simply sand.:whistling:
     
  8. smokeross

    smokeross GTDS Member #49

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    The key is to bury them upside down. The floor is stronger than the top and can support the weight better.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012
  9. Raiden

    Raiden C&R Fun!

    $2500 isn't so bad. They were no less than $4500 - and often much more - when last I looked locally, before delivery.

    Is there some other advantage using a steel shipping container to frame a concrete bunker, over traditional means to make a concrete basement/bunker?

    Ahhhh... Wait a second. I re-watched it, and now I'm noticing there's actually no slab, the container is just floating on pea gravel. Did they also pour concrete on the sides? Kinda looks like they didn't. Their earth seems mostly limestone, so that's cool for them. That totally wouldn't fly where I'm at, though. Ah well.
     
  10. mac66

    mac66 Huge Member Millennium Member

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    That video has been out for awhile.

    The problem with buried shipping containers is the roof structure has to be re-inforced. Burying them upside down just means they will collapse onto the upside down top.

    In terms of cost, the price of the container is multiplied by the cost of transporting it to your property. Add, escavating etc and it becomes quite expensive per square foot of space.

    I researched the whole thing about 10 years ago including specing out everything and found it to be more expensive than putting in a concrete slab and a free standing metal arch type building.

    My initial plan was to put it back into the side of a hill with only the entrance visible.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012
  11. Dexters

    Dexters

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    That is my gut feel also. And with those materials you don't have to think about rust.
     
  12. reeser

    reeser

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    It's a bad idea... The sides cave in and the roof sucks. all the strength is in the corners not on the middles. The way to do it quick and easy is to buy a concrete water cistern. These are perfectly designed for burial and already have a man hole. They're also cheaper at <$1000. I do construction and we bury them all the time, piece of cake!
     
  13. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    Penn's Woods
    I was actually going to start a similar thread tonight...about building underground. But this'll do.

    I'm thinking while digging up the ground for say...and in ground pool, just have the backhoe keep going on the other side of the yard. Local powers that be wouldn't have a clue unless they sat and watched. Even then, no one would really care. What'd be nice is to have it connected to the house via tunnel...

    As far as cost, I could have sworn I've seen them for $1500-ish. Even at $2500, having 400sqft. of living space completely secured and secluded would be a nice thing to have.

    My only question is what sort of credential/training is needed to adapt/design/work with these? I mean when it comes to creating entry-ways, support structures, seals, etc...who does this stuff? Is it an engineer? Are there special contractors for it??

    Thanks

    -Emt1581
     
  14. Dexters

    Dexters

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    The ones I've seen are 40' close to $3K then you have to transport it - usually from a large port - port of NJ for you? - then crane it into place.

    Maybe someone can chime in with what trucking costs are per mile.

    You should compare all that container cost with a re-inforced cement structure.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012
  15. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    Penn's Woods
    I'd be fine with reinforced cement "structure"...I've already got one. ;)

    But starting from scratch...I still have the same question...who do I call? What creds. do they need?

    Thanks

    -Emt1581
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012
  16. kirgi08

    kirgi08 Watcher. Silver Member

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    Acme proving grounds.
    I've spoken a lot about these on GT,my posts are out there.Do the work.'08.
     
  17. Lowjiber

    Lowjiber

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    I just watched a good movie last night entitled, "Take Shelter". In it, the guy uses a container for an addition to his existing shelter (including air vents).

    Not really about shelters, this is kind of a psychological drama, but it's a good movie.
     
  18. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    I would be concerned with a corrosion as well. While it appears to be a quick, short-term solution. Not sure it will stand the test of time.
     
  19. mac66

    mac66 Huge Member Millennium Member

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    Blue Planet
    From my research from some years ago, it cost as much to transport and set into place a container as it does to buy one. Then add prep, like painting or sealing it with tar, support beams and materials, gravel for drainage, excavation costs etc and it becomes more expensive than simple building a cinder block cellar.

    Or like reeser says, just buy a concrete cistern and bury it.
     
  20. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    A friend of mine bought land and considered them for a shelter. He actually found that incorporating the structure into his home plans worked out better and cost less.