close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Welcome to Glock Talk

Why should YOU join our Glock forum?

  • Converse with other Glock Enthusiasts
  • Learn about the latest hunting products
  • Becoming a member is FREE and EASY

If you consider yourself a beginner or an avid shooter, the Glock Talk community is your place to discuss self defense, concealed carry, reloading, target shooting, and all things Glock.

Shaving arm hair but not sharp?

Discussion in 'The Cutting Edge' started by emt1581, Aug 10, 2010.

  1. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

    19,885
    2
    Oct 17, 2002
    Penn's Woods
    My new ScrapYard knife is great, and will easily shave hair off my arm. However, when I run my finger along the blade (not across it), there's no hint of a cut. Why? If I did that with a razor-blade it would definitely cut, deep!

    How can the blade be sharp enough to shave hair but not sharp enough to make a little cut?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
     
  2. Glock2008

    Glock2008 Gun User

    1,038
    2
    Jul 16, 2008
    Up north
    If it shaves its sharp. If you want to cut yourself press harder. :shocked:
     


  3. stormbind

    stormbind

    97
    0
    Mar 18, 2007
    Did you sharpen this yourself? Is it possible there is a burr on the edge? if there was a really really bad burr it would be possible to shave your hair but not cut effortlessly. Can you only shave your hair with one side of the blade? Is it a double bevel edge?
     
  4. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

    19,885
    2
    Oct 17, 2002
    Penn's Woods
    No I didn't sharpen it by myself. It's got the edge it came with last month.

    Not sure what edge it has. Might be a saber but I need a refresher course on that one.

    -Emt1581
     
  5. sns3guppy

    sns3guppy

    4,437
    913
    Sep 4, 2006
    Did it shave in both directions, or just one? If just one, then strop the knife and try again.

    That said, why would you try to cut yourself to see if it's sharp. See if it makes a clean cut in paper, instead. If it's able to shave hair, it's sharp. Stropping might take any slight roll off the edge, but don't run your finger down the blade to check. You can drag the back of your fingernail gently over the blade and feel for equal resistance/shaving in both directions...but don't run flesh down the blade to see if it's sharp. That's just a bad idea.
     
  6. Dennis in MA

    Dennis in MA Get off my lawn

    42,700
    2,807
    Aug 16, 2001
    Taunton, MA
    Hold it in both hands, facing your chest and return your hands to your chest swiftly. I think you'll find the tip blunted as well. LOL

    Try cutting some paper.

    Scrapyards come with a single-bevel only. No compound bevels when edge sharpening.

    It could be a bit dull, but doubtful. Also doubtful that it came with a burr from teh factory. I've gotten blunt knives, but never a burr. And I've been known to own a Busse-kin knife or three. ;)
     
  7. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

    19,885
    2
    Oct 17, 2002
    Penn's Woods
    Busse...is that pronounced Bus-EE or Bew-see?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581
     
  8. tripton

    tripton

    413
    0
    Jan 15, 2007
    BUS-ee.
     
  9. mitchshrader

    mitchshrader Deceased

    8,672
    2
    Jun 14, 2005
    Tulsa
    The factory edge is optimised for whacking/batoning. The steel will stand a *great deal* more sharpening than it ever gets. Returning it to a properly convexed double bevel (arc) is a matter of a good stone (stones) and patient skill. Bussee's designs are ideosyncratic in that they've got a proprietary steel, an odd grind, and much effort spent on handle design and color.

    The folks who like them tend to be fans who are entirely captivated by his designs, and that allows both a premium price, and a tendency to be reluctant applying a reprofiling.

    I'm a heathen and would immediately lengthen the arc, and normalize it, till it cut MY way, I'm a convexed blade kinda guy.

    But INFI especially, and the scrapyard steel as well, both benefit from a longer, thinner edge if slicing is the point, and not whackery..

    And convexing the edge merely allows useful longevity. A real knife sharpener will gripe and anyone who lacks that skill will be glad for the 'single' (asymmetric) bevel. I won't diss the knives, but a hunk of his profit is the careful hand grinding available but infrequently applied.

    Shaving hair can be accomplished easily when sharpened to 1000/1200 grit, smooth convexed edge might be 3-4000 (chefs slicing knife), and 6-8000 for high carbon sushi knives and straight razors. I 'tune' my keepers until the steel runs out, I like to find out what is optimal for slicing, and convex them and burnish them till the steel meets it's limits. This is often above 10,000 grit, and a skilled art in itself.

    And too fragile for whackery.

    I'm 5 11 and 135 lbs. My knives slice. Well.

    Bussee or not.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2010
  10. tripton

    tripton

    413
    0
    Jan 15, 2007
    Well, kind of.

    I think you over simplify Busse knives and kin and their stated purpose. Many knives that come from Ohio are full convex, right from the start. They grind their knives according to purpose, and since the main purpose (but not for ALL of their knives) is hardcore use and abuse, the knives and grinds tend to be a bit thicker than (IMO) necessary. This also reinforces their unbeatable warranty.

    My Regulator came with probably a 60 to 80 degree edge bevel. It is the bluntest that I have ever seen. I have not used the knife, because after I got it in hand, I just couldnt find a use for a knife that is a third of an inch thick. Anything the Reg will do, my SOD will do better (except hold an edge, because the Reg is SR101, and the SOD is SR77).

    There is nothing wrong with the asymmetric bevel, and people that know how to sharpen a knife will not complain about them. They are made for people that know knives, and know enough about them to understand it. They are also quite easy to sharpen.


    All of that said, my edges turn out slightly convex because i sharpen all of my users on a paper wheel setup. After you become accustomed to one of them, all other methods seem slow and outdated.
     
  11. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

    19,885
    2
    Oct 17, 2002
    Penn's Woods
    The knife I'm talking about IS the regulator...so, due to the "blunt" edge...is this thing not truly sharp or what?

    Thanks!

    -Emt1581