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Seed information

Discussion in 'Survival/Preparedness Forum' started by Glock 1, Apr 20, 2012.


  1. Glock 1

    Glock 1
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    I want to buy some seeds for a small garden but I want to be able to use the seeds that come from what I grow to replenish my seed stock. Is there any particular brand that is best? I heard most seeds yield crops with sterile seeds.
     

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  2. DrSticky

    DrSticky
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    You need Heirloom or Non-Hybrid seeds. If the package says these things you are good. You won't find many of them at your local hardware store, but there may be some. Just type "heirloom seeds" into Google and you will find a bunch.
     

  3. Glock 1

    Glock 1
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    Cool! Thanks! I have a couple of places like Calloways near my house. I will check there too. Now onto my next conundrum, what to grow....:whistling:
     
  4. AaronZR2

    AaronZR2
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    I'm gonna say at least partly peppers to spice up whatever kind of crap you might find yourself eating in an emergency scenario
     
  5. barbedwiresmile

    barbedwiresmile
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    Mrs BWS is in charge of seeds at the "compound".

    She says: "I recommend Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds and Renee's Garden. Between those two you'll get everything you need. High quality, good germination, outstanding variety."

    Both have websites and on-line ordering options. Baker Creek does a really nice catalog as well.
     
  6. Glock 1

    Glock 1
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    Thanks. I will check them out. I am building two 4'x8'x20" raised beds and putting up 60 feet of tilted gutter planters on my fence to plant shallow rooting veggies and herbs in. I have planned 4.5 cubic yards of organic soil mixed for medium drainage to be delivered. I have chicken wire wraps planned to keep out critters.

    I am also planning a pair of rain barrels to catch rainwater from my gutters to water the beds in the event of water shortages this year. They will be gravity feed to the planters with a cutoff valve and built in soaker hoses in the beds.

    I will grow my own seeds to dry and freeze and then feed my family in the interim. I want to avoid insecticides and sythetic fertilizers.

    Anymore advice, keep it coming.
     
  7. barbedwiresmile

    barbedwiresmile
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    Congratulations on taking the step to raise your own food. In a world of industrial food, this is one of the best things you can do for your family, for your health, and for our political and cultural situation.

    Not really familiar with your soil conditions or weather patterns but feel free to throw any specific questions my way. One thing I always recommend is to get into composting and canning.

    Composting will help you cut down on waste and condition your soil over time to wean you off of dependence on third party soil. Raising small animals like chickens and rabbits can help you further in this regard. There are also abundant sources of horse manure. Many horse farms, schools and ranches are more than happy to have you come buy and fill up a truck bed.

    Canning is a great way to preserve your surplus and also to create delicious jams, jellies, salsas, etc. You also won't be reliant on the power grid (freezing) to keep your stores.

    I get teased for refusing to use pesticides and herbicides (though I admit to have broken down once or twice and used Sevin during a particularly bad year - I am ashamed). Scour the internets for sites dedicated to natural growing and you'll find plenty of ideas on combating pests with natural methods. Weeds should be less of a problem in your raised beds but if you see weeds growing, stay on 'em. Be careful not to over-water. I've seen quite a few new gardeners make this mistake and do nothing but feed weeds.

    Best of luck.
     
  8. Stevekozak

    Stevekozak
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    Huge +1 on Baker Creek. Really good stuff, and they have an interesting variety.
     
  9. Glock 1

    Glock 1
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    I totally forgot the compost bin. I will have one of those too. Canning is something I need to get the wife into but I agree completely. She will be helping but since I am building the thing and will do most of the harvesting, she can can it for me. lol
     
  10. JKDGabe

    JKDGabe
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    OP = open pollinated, will reproduce true to type
    F1 = first generation hybrid, will reproduce... but who knows what

    So in a pinch, you can grow the hybrids and save the seed, but you'll get some funky F2's until you eventually stabilize them in future grow outs.

    http://alanbishop.proboards.com/index.cgi Here's an awesome site full of people who both grow and breed their own plants.

    Start small so you don't get overwhelmed and discouraged. Enjoy the journey!