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Savings Reloading???

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Iamaarmed, Aug 6, 2014.

  1. Probably been asked and answered here. If so please direct me to thread. if not ...what is the cost of reloading rounds for the Glock? In other words not lead. I know we can use an other barrel but that is not what I am asking. So what is the savings per box. Box of 50 reloads against a box of 9mm Between $12 and $15. Or a simple cost per round. Any info appreciated.
     
  2. eaglefrq

    eaglefrq NRA Member

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    I am currently loading X-Treme 124gr RN and it costs about $7.40 for a box of 50. That does not include the cost of the press and setup.

    However, it will vary depending on powder and primer availability.
     

    Last edited: Aug 6, 2014

  3. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    I'm pretty close to that number as well, running about $7.45, so roughly .15 per round.
     
  4. sciolist

    sciolist

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    My 9mm match/practice ammo costs about half the price of factory FMJ.

    Cost per 50 rounds is not really the way to think about it. I have about 80 thousand rounds' worth of 9mm components on the shelf now, and would be a lot more than that if not for the current supply problems.

    Actual cost per round depends on a variety of factors.

    Another important consideration is that the quality of hand-loaded ammo is much higher than factory.
     
  5. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Quality depends on the loader. Are you measuring each round, trickling powder, etc. or are you just an ordinary handle puller. If you're taking extreme amounts of time on match ammo, then I'd agree you're probably producing ammo that is much higher quality than factory. If you're just an ordinary handle puller (like probably 90% of us are with pistol rounds). Quality is really only an issue if you're shooting some serious matches, etc. We all want ammo that goes bang every time we pull the trigger, so I'm not including that in "quality" because I've honestly had very few problems out of most factory ammo (WinUSA, UMC, etc.) If you're just an every day paper plinker who's just practicing.. you're not gonna see a whole lot of difference.

    IMO The best things about reloading are:
    1. Cost
    2. Being able to tune a round to your liking. If a round isn't hot enough to cycle one of your guns, then just bump the charge up a bit. If you feel it's got to much recoil or is to hot, lower the charge a bit. Factory ammo obviously takes a more "one size fits all" approach.
     
  6. Jon_R

    Jon_R

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    My opinion if you will save money depends on the following.

    1) Is reloading fun? If not and it is a pain then how much value do you put on your time?
    2) You need to shoot lots of volume to save enough for the cost of the reloading gear.

    If you feel reloading is fun meaning it is a hobby you enjoy and you will shoot in enough volume (depends on caliber) you can save money or more than likely you will shoot more for the nearly the same cost.

    If you feel reloading is a chore and you need to save $25 per hour reloading to make it worth it then maybe not.
     
  7. njl

    njl

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    The cost of everything keeps going up...but it's not hard to figure out.

    Depending on the type (coated, plated, jacketed) and weight of bullet, you're looking at about $3.50-$5 for 50 bullets. About $1.50 for the primers. About $0.75-$1 for powder.

    So, that's about $6-$7.50 for a box of 50 reloads.

    This assumes you buy everything in bulk to maximize savings / spread out hazmat costs on powder/primers, and have a free collection/supply of brass. If you have to buy brass, look for once fired...it's much cheaper than factory new stuff and if you don't lose it, you should be able to reuse it many times...so its cost gets spread out over many "boxes" of ammo.

    So, the simple answer is, after you've spent a considerable sum on all the tools to actually do your own reloading, you can make 9mm ammo for about half the cost of the cheap stuff at Walmart.

    If you like saving money, want to tailor your own ammo (what do you mean, Walmart doesn't carry subsonic 9mm or minor PF .45acp...and why should JHP cost more than FMJ?), it's a no brainer. You do need to have the time and space to use and setup the reloading equipment.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2014
  8. fredj338

    fredj338

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    3c for primers, 1-2c for powder, bullets 9-12c, depending on plated or FMJ. So $6.50-$8.50 per 50rds at current prices.
     
  9. BobbyS

    BobbyS Truth always sounds like lies to a sinner

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    :agree:
     
  10. JBnTX

    JBnTX Bible Thumper

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    You don't reload to save money, you reload to shoot more.

    In 37 years of reloading, I've never saved a penny because any realized savings just went to buy more reloading supplies and equipment.
     
  11. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy

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    Reloading in and of itself is a great hobby.
    And as said it is not only about the savings but being able to make ammo for your firearms.
    Shoot more for the same after costs are recovered for equipment needed. :supergrin:
     
  12. fredj338

    fredj338

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    I really hate this argument. Fact: you do save $$ on every round you Make. Whether you choose to spend that on more shooting or take the honey out for dinner, your choice, but you do save $$ reloading on a per round basis.:upeyes:
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2014
  13. naughtymoose

    naughtymoose

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  14. Angry Fist

    Angry Fist Dehumanizer® Lifetime Member

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    Came in at $4.30 for 50 rounds. That cost will only go up once I have to buy brass, bullets, or lead. The majority of the lead I started with is almost gone, and most of it was free. I've been saving my brass for years, and should be able to load them a handful of times.
     
  15. fredj338

    fredj338

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    I rarely quote my actual cost for reloading any caliber. I have primers from back when you could get them for less than $20/K. Right now loading with some 15yr old RD, throw casting my own bullets from free scrounged lead, I can reload any service caliber for $2/50, but that isn't realistic or relevant to the new guys buying in todays climate.:crying: So to those that say you don't save $$ reloading, really? I am shooting 45acp for less than guys are shooting 22lr.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2014
  16. sciolist

    sciolist

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    I agree that the ability to customize is a more pronounced advantage than Q/C. I was lumping all of that together (ie. Q/C and characteristics of the ammo). Should have explained better.

    I never had major problems with factory ammo not going off, failing to chamber, etc. That sort of thing might be on the order of 1 round in 5 or 6 hundred with cheap factory ball. But it’s more like 1/10,000 with hand loads.

    No, I’m not copiously checking each round I load in all possible ways. But I consider casing it and a close visual inspection of the primers part of the process. Whereas with factory ammo, I do not expect to have to do that.

    Malfunctions are not a big deal plinking at the pit, but they can easily ruin a stage or put you completely out of the hunt at a match. I feel a lot better looking after the Q/C myself. I don’t generally case practice ammo, and have always been impressed at how well the Glocks run with most of what comes off the press. I save up my case rejects, and every once in a while have a rejects-only practice day. Most of them run fine.
     
  17. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    I'm in a little different spot re: reloading.

    Shooting is my hobby. I like shooting!
    Reloading is NOT my hobby. I do not like reloading!

    So, for pistol, I want to load fast enough to consider myself as making somewhere north of $50/hour. So, I have to load at least $100 worth of ammo per hour at factory cost. That's not all that hard, actually.

    For precision rifle, all I have to do is compare my cost against $2/round for Lapua Match and there's no way I'm not well paid!

    Then there is accuracy. For no particularly good reason, and I don't take credit for any aspect of it, my Rem 700 just loves my reloads and when I see 3 shots in the very same hole, reloading begins to become tolerable. Targets get taped to the refrigerator. That kind of thing...

    I think there is a certain euphoria in loading the first couple of thousand pistol rounds. They certainly look cool in an ammo can, all bright and shiny. But after that, it's just grunt work. Necessary, but not mentally challenging.

    Richard
     
  18. unclebob

    unclebob

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    In the long run it all depends on how much you shoot? What kind of reloading equipment you buy? How much of your reloading supplies you buy and one time? What type of bullet you use? All have a lot to do on how much you can save. And how long it takes to pay off the reloading equipment. In the long run if you are like most people you do not save money you just shoot more for the same amount of money.
    Some people think if they are not saving $$ an hour reloading it is not worth it to them. If that is the case? Don’t worry about reloading just work on making out your Will.
     
  19. naughtymoose

    naughtymoose

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    If you reload you can dial in a load that your Glock likes better than the Walmart discount ammo. Yes you can save money or you may find yourself with a room full of expensive equipment and passion for crafting ammo that you enjoy shooting more than equivalent factory ammo.

    I could say that I can load premium ammo that my Glock loves for less than $130 a thousand to give you a bench mark. Its a great hobby with many benefits...just get a mentor and ease into the water.

    There is a certain satisfaction knowing that when the shelves are empty at the local stores you can keep going.
     
  20. njl

    njl

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    Until its the smokeless powder shelves, everywhere.