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Red dot sight or longslide?

Discussion in 'The 10 Ring' started by gofastman, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
    a Burris FastFire III 3MOA cost about as much as a bare longslide for my 20, which would be better for long range accuracy/hunting
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013
  2. Meathead9

    Meathead9

    1,207
    3
    Aug 23, 2009
    The PRK
    I think the RMR would be better suited to ride on a 10mm slide. I would skip the Longslide, and have either L&M or TSD mill the stock slide for the RMR. I know it's more expensive, but I think it's another one of those "you get what you pay for" situations. The RDS will hands down be the better option for long range targets.
     


  3. NDCent

    NDCent Socially Inept

    3,705
    176
    Mar 19, 2010
    Ozarks
    I run a 3moa dot on my G35. Made a world of difference in my shooting accuracy. But, you'll have a 3 inch dot at 100 yds. and a 1.5 inch dot at 50 yds.

    At 35 yards, off hand, I couldn't tell that much difference between my G27 and G35. Adding the 3moa reflex was like cheating. Once you get use to finding the dot (took me a couple boxes of shells) you won't want to shoot without one.
     
  4. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
    Thanks for the input.
    The RMR is a bit expensive for me, I was looking at eather a J-Point or FF3, leaning more toward the later
     
  5. Meathead9

    Meathead9

    1,207
    3
    Aug 23, 2009
    The PRK
    Since you said that your 2 options are the FF3 or a BARE Longslide, I think you should consider the total cost of a Longslide before you say the RMR is too expensive. After internals, barrel, guide rod, springs, sights & maybe a Cerakote type finish, you're pretty close to the cost of a milled in RMR.
     
  6. nickE10mm

    nickE10mm F.S.F.O.S.

    4,144
    76
    Apr 13, 2004
    Wichita, KS
    No quesiton about it, go with the RMR (or FF3 if you can't afford the RMR).

    I've shot both, owned the G20 longslide and have a Fusion longslide, plus, I've shot reflex sites on G20's and would definitely recommend the reflex site.

    It will be more accurate, by far.
     
  7. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
    well I guess that settles it!
    thanks.
    I gotta ask, whats so great about the RMR? is it just a better unit all around, or something specific?
     
  8. nickE10mm

    nickE10mm F.S.F.O.S.

    4,144
    76
    Apr 13, 2004
    Wichita, KS
    The RMR is simply the best reflex sight on the market. Its tough and durable, has the best optics and probably the best service. HOWEVER ... don't worry if you can't afford it. I've not heard a single bad thing about the FF3 (so long as you mill your slide as opposed to using their "one size fits all" mount that is apparently NOT O.S.F.A.)
     
  9. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
  10. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
  11. nickE10mm

    nickE10mm F.S.F.O.S.

    4,144
    76
    Apr 13, 2004
    Wichita, KS
    Yes, that's what I was referring to. Everything I've heard indicates that the one-size-fits-all mounts fit ALL Glock models EXCEPT for the large frame models.

    I'd LOVE to be proved wrong. I've heard of guys filing in then to make them work but never heard of any who tried the mount and it worked as sold.

    Let me know what you find out! Burris would know...
     
  12. Ryno12

    Ryno12 NRA Life Member

    19
    0
    Oct 5, 2012
    Wisconsin
    Yes, that is the Burris dovetail mount, however, it needed to be milled. It is advertised as "fits all Glocks" but it doesn't fit the G20 or 21.
     
  13. nickE10mm

    nickE10mm F.S.F.O.S.

    4,144
    76
    Apr 13, 2004
    Wichita, KS
    Anddddd my question is answered. :-/
     
  14. nickE10mm

    nickE10mm F.S.F.O.S.

    4,144
    76
    Apr 13, 2004
    Wichita, KS
    I've also heard that the fastfires can also use doctor or aim point flat base mounts I could be wrong on the companies. Also, it might only be 2nd gen Fastfires... If you mill a mount you might as well mill the slide, right?
     
  15. Yondering

    Yondering

    564
    0
    Dec 3, 2011
    I own both, and disagree that the RMR is better for long range, if you have good vision. I find that my longslide is better at long distances, because the RMR makes it harder to estimate hold over. The long sight radius negates any accuracy advantage of the RMR, for me, and that's even with the small dot on my RM01.

    Then again, it depends a lot on your vision and skill level too. The RMR certainly makes it easier to hit targets between 10-50 yards out. Closer or farther, iron sights are more natural for me, but maybe that's just me.
     
  16. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
    dang, 50 yards seems like long range for a pistol to me!
     
  17. Meathead9

    Meathead9

    1,207
    3
    Aug 23, 2009
    The PRK
    Strange. I figured it would be much easier to estimate holdover using a red dot. With the red dot you can actually see your target while holding over it. Holding over with iron sights, the front sight will cover most of your target (if not all of it). How much holdover does the 10mm need at say 100yds? I would think that if a flat shooting 10mm is zeroed at 25yds, POA for 100yds shouldn't be too much different.

    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013
  18. Yondering

    Yondering

    564
    0
    Dec 3, 2011
    The red dot makes holdover estimation difficult (for me), because there is no size reference. It's easy to learn how much front sight to hold over with iron sights for long range, but the dot doesn't work that way. On my RMR at least, the dot seems to vary in size (and clarity) a little in different lighting conditions, so it doesn't work that well to hold one dot high, for example.

    Re. the front sight covering the target, you should be shooting with both eyes open, so the target is still visible. There are different ways to do it, but I keep the rear sight aligned with the target, and hold the front sight over, the amount I need, so depending on the range and caliber, I may be sighting along the top of the front sight, top of the white dot, center of the dot, etc.

    Trying to align the rear sight somewhere lower on the front sight, then align the target on the top of the front sight, doesn't work well for me; some teach it, but I don't use that method. I feel it's too complex and less accurate.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  19. Ryno12

    Ryno12 NRA Life Member

    19
    0
    Oct 5, 2012
    Wisconsin
    I'm with you on this one. Two eyes open & holdover is easier with an RDS. My Burris FF is zeroed at 50yds and works great at any range I'm gonna use to.
    I looked into an RMR but I couldn't justify $250 more for a "disposable" optic.