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Recommend me a tough corporate netbook....

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by airmotive, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. airmotive

    airmotive Tin Kicker

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    Debris Field
    Okay....so my company is doing a massive IT hardware upgrade program. My old Dell 610 had reched the point where I had stopped taking it with me when I travel, and was using my personal laptop for work and my crackberry for secure email.

    Since we now have a rather large budget set aside for new computers, I am going to run an idea up our corporate flagpole: In addition to new laptops, how about our little team of 5 guys also be issued company netbooks.

    We need rugged, light and secure. Something we can log onto the company's VPN. It will need to be Windows-based in order to play with some proprietary software.

    Basically, on any given day, my phone rings and I get on a plane to 'somewhere'. I might have to hike several miles into an area. Could spend a night or two outdoors. Needs a USB for data transfers and digital photo dumps. Will do some word processing and email. Maybe some very light photo editing (cropping and compressing).

    Toughbooks are great....until you have to carry one up a mountain.

    What's the toughest, Windows-based netbook out there right now?

    Oh...also...I'm pitching the netbook idea as an "in addition to" our new laptops. So the expense has to be kept in check as much as possible.
     
  2. gemeinschaft

    gemeinschaft AKA Fluffy316

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    If you are looking for a durable netbook, I would check out the Dell Latitude 2120. They are 10.1 inch screened netbooks that are very well built and can put up with some abuse.
     


  3. zigzagg321

    zigzagg321 clever quip

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    my ASUS EEE rides in the backpack for school, it gets passed around a lot, Ive dropped it more than once, its still 100% after 1.5 years and has never had a problem or issue.
     
  4. gemeinschaft

    gemeinschaft AKA Fluffy316

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    As netbooks go, I like the Asus EEE netbooks too. Just make sure you get one with 2GB of Ram, it's worth it.
     
  5. Detectorist

    Detectorist

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    Also, if you get a Dell, get the 'Complete Care' warranty with it. It covers accidents.
     
  6. cs133atom

    cs133atom

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    Dell XFR series notebooks will do the trick for you. From mil-spec to semi-rugged.
     
  7. airmotive

    airmotive Tin Kicker

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    Debris Field
    From what I read, to qualify as a netbook under Microsoft's licensing program, the machine has to have no more than 1GB of RAM and 250Gb HDD. (or is that old info?)
    Regardless, adding another DIMM is easy.

    Will do some reading up on the EEEEEEEE:supergrin:

    We're already getting notebooks...I'm looking for a small netbook to carry into the field. Something cheap enough to not raise the bean counters' ire and, frankly, expendable.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2011
  8. gemeinschaft

    gemeinschaft AKA Fluffy316

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    Sure, but at $4,000 a piece, it might be cheaper to just get accidental coverage on a netbook type of equipment and let them warranty it when you break it.

    :whistling:
     
  9. gemeinschaft

    gemeinschaft AKA Fluffy316

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    http://www.asus.com/Eee/Eee_PC/Eee_PC_1015PEM/#specifications

    Here is the Asus that I am talking about. Upgrading to SSD is very cool, but expensive and should be avoided unless you really need the benefits of SSD.

    Netbooks with a DIMM that support up to 2GB are the way to go. IMHO
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2011
  10. Linux3

    Linux3

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    I have to go with the Lenovo Thinkpad X series.
    Slightly larger than a Netbook but hey, it's a Thinkpad.

    They have an 11" model which is under 3 lbs and has good battery life.
    A thinkpad should be easier to get through the bean counters.

    I have an Asus EEE Netbook and I really like it for vacation. For work travel I like a little more.

    http://shop.lenovo.com/us/products/Laptops/ThinkPad/x-series/x120e/index.html
     
  11. GIockGuy24

    GIockGuy24 Bring M&M's

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    Asus has (had?) "business editions" of the Eee. They have upgraded versions of Windows and come with 2 GB of memory instead of 1 GB. They are made better than the cheaper Eee and cost more than twice as much. The Dell netbook is available with a cell phone (wireless internet) card but I'm not sure if the Eee is available with that but for the price it might.
     
  12. stevemc

    stevemc

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    I am a phone tech and carry a notebook daily for programming. I have dropped my HP at least 6 times including edge wise on concrete and asphalt. She kept running strong with no problems or screen cracks- props to HP. I made the mistake of going into an Apple store about six months ago and became instantly deeply addicted. Such a wonderful product. Of course your software may dictate your choice. Dual boot is a choice with the MAC, but I have no idea about durability, as I have not taken it out of the house yet. Lots of money to spend on computers, cool.

    Let us know what you come up with.

    Steve.
     

  13. BADABING.

    SSD on shock proof chasis, the entire thing is like a freaking brick. My brother has had one now for several years and its still plugging along, and he is NOT known for being kind to inanimate objects, just look at all his first issued laptops.
     
  14. I'd ditch that idea. Netbooks really kinda suck.

    I have an 11.6" Acer that I carry around every day. Physically, it's not much bigger than most 10" netbooks, but internally, it has a dual-core celeron, 3GB RAM, a 250GB HD, etc.....it's actually a compact laptop, not a netbook.

    Anyway, it serves my needs which is setting up routers & other hardware, and other stuff that computer techs like me do, but it is not very much fun to work on for extended periods.

    Teeny touchpad, small screen.....no fun.

    Honestly, I'd take a look at some solid 14-15.6" laptops and if someone needs something more portable, see if you can fit an iPad into your IT infrastructure.

    As far as performance go, netbooks are not that great, and they are extremely limited as far as upgrades; no free RAM slots, etc.

    JMO....
     
  15. boomhower

    boomhower

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    Whatever you get slurge for SSD's. By far the biggest improvement I have ever done to a computer. Shock proof and fast as hell. Best upgrade I have ever done, only thing that comes close was single->dual core. I've had hopped up quads and an SSD makes more difference in day to day usage.
     
  16. GIockGuy24

    GIockGuy24 Bring M&M's

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    The main advantage of solid state drives is battery life. The drives do wear out though.