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Rechambering rounds...

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by ScottMn, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. ScottMn

    ScottMn

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    I have only one pistol....G26.... and like to dry fire but yet keep a round in the chamber. Is the problem with rechambering the danger of "shortening" the round after repeated loading? I have Federal HST's for defense and I measured the OAL of out of the box rounds and got 1.098"-1.101". The round I've chambered four times falls within these measurements. When is the round considered out of spec.? Would it be OK to trust a round that measured 1.096"? I do not let the slide chamber a round by itself. I manually guide the slide back to battery after dry fire practice. There doesn't appear to be any wear or damage to the round that has been chambered multiple times. Am I good to go?


    Thanks..................
     
  2. larson1122

    larson1122

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    I typically only chamber the same round twice. After that it gets demoted to range use only. You could probably get away with chambering the same round many times without an issue but I don't want to take that chance.
     

  3. Glock Coma

    Glock Coma Aluminum Member

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    no more than three times for me. Every time I unchamber a round I mark it with a black sharpie and put it in the bottom of the mag. When and if I get through the whole mag and all rounds have been chambered 3 times, I shoot the whole mag at the range.

    But I hardly ever get through a whole mag because I have 7 mags and I shoot a lot.
     
  4. kibb

    kibb

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    Why not just put it back in the pipe by hand, close the slide, and then load the mag?
     
  5. OdinIII

    OdinIII

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    That damages the extractor. It is designed for the case to slide behind the extractor, not over the rim.

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  6. vafish

    vafish

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    Several thoughts come to mind.

    1. What you are referring to is called "Bullet Set Back". If the bullet is seated deeper into the case it can result in greatly increased chamber pressures.

    2. In my experience guns vary greatly in how badly they set back a round during chambering and re-chambering. I had a 1911 that would jam the bullet halfway back into the case the second time you chambered the same round. My Glocks seem much more forgiving. The only way to tell how badly your gun sets back bullets is to run an experiment in a safe place repeatedly chambering the same round and measuring the set back. You need to test your gun.

    3. Slowly lowering your slide to chamber a round is a bad idea. The gun is designed to slam shut with the full force of the recoil spring. Anything less can lead to problems. Your gun may malfunction when you need it most.
     
  7. kodiakpb

    kodiakpb

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    You can do it the same way one does a press check.
     
  8. Dave.1

    Dave.1

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    I've posted this before, but here is an excellent example of 9mm setback.

    Both are Hornady XTP, unchambered is on the right. The owner if the pistol didn't know how often he'd chambered the round on the left.

    [​IMG]



    Dave
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2012
  9. Zeroskillet

    Zeroskillet MIA 305

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    Wait...what?

    So that is the SAME ammo but the one on the left was chambered for a given period of time and contracted? Wow I had no idea that happened. :dunno:
     
  10. Dave.1

    Dave.1

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    Yeah, you can see that the one on the left is also pretty scratched up from being loaded from the magazine a bunch of times.

    I wouldn't want that to be the first round I fired in self defense. :wow:

    Dave
     
  11. ScottMn

    ScottMn

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    Thanks for all the responses. Thanks for the term "set back" and the explaination that guns can behave differently. I made some time this afternoon and chambered a round 50 times taking a measurement every 5. I did not ease the slide forward but let it fly with the full force of the RSA. The first reading was 1.100, the second 1.099 and the fiftieth 1.099. Either the 26 is easy on ammo or the Federal HST's are tougher than most. Basically there was no change in OAL.

    While the very simple, small sample(one round) doesn't show any set back I don't think I'll be using the same round fifty times and then expecting it to perform. It is comforting to know that my gun isn't hammering the bullet down in the case, at least this particular round. The extractor marred up the rim pretty good so that round is getting disposed of properly. It's also, in my mind at least, another reason not to chamber a round too often.

    Is there only danger when you can physically see the set back? In other words........a lot of set back. Or, is a hundredth of an inch too much? Not sure if anyone has experimented with it and I KNOW that I'm not going to be the first one....... Probably best to check individual ammo/manufacturers to see which one are prone to set back during the first few chamberings.

    When chambering a round after dry fire practice letting the slide forward by hand, I've always pressed the slide forward to make sure it's in full battery. Most of the time it's already fully engaged but if it's not, the push seems to set it completely. Haven't had a problem but that doesn't mean that it's the correct way to do it? Yes/no?

    Thanks for the time guys.....
     
  12. truetopath

    truetopath

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    My guns are usually always loaded and chambered even when in the safe, but when I empty them and eject the round, I usually rotate it to the bottom and usually once a month I'll pull a new round from the box, stand it up and compare all the rounds in the mag and if any are setback I pull them and set them aside for disposal. Just the way I do it.
     
  13. barth

    barth six barrels

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    I like to rotate the ammo.
    And try to not unload and re-load too much.

    For what it's worth seems like 357 Sig is particularly susceptible.
     
  14. vafish

    vafish

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    I don't like press checks either. Load your gun, put it in your holster and leave it alone.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2012
  15. ChicagoZman

    ChicagoZman

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    Even if no setback is evident, the next time it chambers it could set the bullet back and you wouldn't know it until you measured the next time or fired that round. I wouldn't chamber the same round more than three times but I'd rather be safe than sorry.
     
  16. Bello

    Bello America/Italia

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    Stop crimping like girls and you'll have no problems
     
  17. Dave.1

    Dave.1

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    Bello, I don't reload but someone told me neck tension was important here also. Is that true?

    Dave
     
  18. DocWills

    DocWills

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    Its the crimp on reloads. Taper crimp all around best choice.
     
  19. Dave.1

    Dave.1

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    Thanks!

    Trying to expand my knowledge and every bit helps.

    Dave
     
  20. Wizz

    Wizz

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    I don't even worry about it at all, I reuse rounds that have been dropped in the dirt, etc (simply blow them off) and back in the chamber they go. I've had carry rounds chambered hundreds of times until they get shot off a year or so later...they all go bang.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012