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Rear Sight Alignment on G22 Question!

Discussion in 'Sights, Optics and Lasers' started by TurtleBoy617, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. TurtleBoy617

    TurtleBoy617 OoRah!

    402
    0
    Mar 5, 2006
    Hey guys,

    Just got my Trijicon G11's with the "Novak Rearsight" and had them put on at a local gun place. I have had very great experiences with them in the past, and can't knock them at all, in fact they were generous to put these sights on this G22 (and remove the ones on their previous and install them on my G23) for no charge.

    But

    I got home and put the slide on the G22 frame and noticed that the rear novak sight is not perfectly centered on the slide. Here is what I'm talking about if you can notice in the picture:

    [​IMG]

    It is alright slightly more to the right of the slide, maybe 1mm off-center.

    Does this matter? Or should it still shoot straight?

    I want to take it out and shoot to try it out. I would feel bad for going back to the shop and complaining about free labor, so I want some opinions on it and I am going to go shoot it to see how it is before I ask them or someone else to adjust it for me.
     
  2. scattershot

    scattershot

    501
    37
    Nov 15, 2010
    Denver, CO
    I'd shoot it first, then if you need to adjust it, you can drift it yourself with no trouble.
     


  3. TurtleBoy617

    TurtleBoy617 OoRah!

    402
    0
    Mar 5, 2006
    How do you "drift" them without a sight pusher?
     
  4. When I install glock rear sights, they are centered in the slide
     
  5. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

    6,927
    20
    Jan 3, 2009
    Smyrna, GA
    Most I've seen (even factory) were biased slightly toward the right side?

    I was expecting to see a bunch of "it's normal, shoot it", responses.

    Anyway, OP, I'd certainly shoot it before I worried much about it.
     
  6. TurtleBoy617

    TurtleBoy617 OoRah!

    402
    0
    Mar 5, 2006
    I tried tapping it a bit to the left, but i didn't want to tap too hard and break it, it didn't move, and just slightly scuffed the appearance.

    The range I am going to go to this week said they have the tool and can push it over for me if need be.

    I will put some rounds through it though.

    Would having a rear sight to the right typically cause the gun to shoot to the right or left?
     
  7. scattershot

    scattershot

    501
    37
    Nov 15, 2010
    Denver, CO
    Use a non marring punch such as nylon, and loosen the set screw before you try to drift them.
     
  8. TurtleBoy617

    TurtleBoy617 OoRah!

    402
    0
    Mar 5, 2006
    the front sight looks good. I am going to take it shooting this week as it is. I shoot to the left anyways, so maybe this is a blessing. My only concern is that since this weapon will be used for police training, i may become a straighter shot, while this shoots off because of the sight.
     
  9. emore

    emore

    1,127
    26
    Dec 29, 2010
    upstate SC
    Just curious about the front. Glad it is OK. If the sights shoot to one side or the other, you will have to get it squared away before any serious training starts. Didn't you say the range has a sight pusher that they would assist you with? I would take them up on that offer. Just "bench rest" the gun off of whatever you can ( I use my gigantic shooting bag) and see where three consecutive rounds go. If they aren't going to about the same place, you need to work on technique. If they do go to one close group, you know which way to adjust. You move the rear sight in the direction you want the bullet to move. If it's shooting left and you want it to move to the right, move the sight slightly to the right, etc.
    Good luck.
     
  10. 21Carrier

    21Carrier Until I Gota 29

    3,037
    11
    Feb 4, 2011
    Hoover, AL
    First, it looks like that sight has a set screw, so if you try to move it again, loosen the set screw first. Once you loosen the set screw it might move easily.

    Second, that sight is OFF! I would expect problems. As far off-center as it is, I'm thinking you will see about 2-3" right at 10-15 yards.

    Finally, GO GET IT CENTERED!!! You sound somewhat new to shooting. If so, you need to be shooting with a pistol that's sighted in. I can't believe no one has said this yet. You adjust your sights to fit your shooting (but only after your technique is GOOD and consistent), not the other way around. You're gonna be adjusting your shooting to misaligned sights. That's just plain backwards.

    Who knows why your gunsmith did that, but I'm assuming it was just overlooked. When I bought my G21SF, I noticed it shooting right, and sure enough, the sights were not centered. The place I bought it had installed Glock night sights, and did a terrible job. Even if you're an experienced shooter, your sights need to be centered. IF you start shooting left, and ABSOLUTELY can't fix it with technique adjustment, then, and ONLY then, move that rear sight to the right.

    I would advise shooting with a perfectly centered rear sight for at least a few months of shooting. If you just cannot get rid of your shooting left problem, then adjust the sights, but only as a last resort. The problem is technique, and IT should be fixed first.

    EDIT: Maybe some gunsmiths adjust Glock sights to the right, to somewhat correct the low-left issues most new Glock shooters have. Just a guess, but it was likely just an accident.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  11. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

    28,685
    9
    Mar 26, 2003

    Yes, they are Novak sights. They have a set screw. Of the 6-9 I've installed 1/2 of them dropped in, a few required some elbow grease, one required use of a file.


    Yes, the sight is off center, but upon close view one would see it is more "skewered" or torqued (twisted about the center line of the gun) than it is "off center".

    Here is a generic formula for calculating rear sight adjustments...

    D1 / R1 = D2 / R2
    For rear sight adjustments:

    • D1 is the distance between point of aim and point of impact.
    • R1 is range from front sight to target.
    • D2 is the length the rear sight must change by.
    • R2 is the distance between front and rear sights.

    So, your shooting a (averaged) 2.5" group off at 15 yards (540") on a G22 with sights approximately 7" apart is (2.5/540) = 0.00463 = (0.03241/7)

    About 3 hundredths of an inch.

    I know from personal experience, this amount of deviation on the rear sight does not produce the level of artifacts you propose. I have a gun (G17) that shoots 1" to the right at 45ft, and I CANNOT see the difference with my naked eye to make that adjustment. I have a G26 that shot 2" to the left at 45ft. I had to scratch markings on the slide at the rear sight and then drift the sight over these markings.

    In case you think it's all bull-hockey, here is a pic of my shooting, using stock sights, and Ultramax factory reloaded ammo shooting from a two handed unsupported standing position...to a distance of 50ft.

    [​IMG]




    'Drew
    :cool:
     
  12. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

    6,927
    20
    Jan 3, 2009
    Smyrna, GA
    I think that's a good point, and very possibly what is happening (installed to the right slightly on purpose). Mine is to the right, and for awhile I was hitting "center'ish", but I've really been working on trigger technique, and noticed I am now hitting right of center. I want to shoot it several more times to confirm that trend, and if it continues, will adjust it then.