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Quick question about nameservers

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by rsagona1, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. rsagona1

    rsagona1 Hello

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    This is something that is bothering me because I guess it's my OCD but I have to know how everything works. Nothing is broken on my end, just out of curiosity.

    I have a virtual dedicated server, let's say it's server.rsagona.com.

    My customers who I host (a whopping two!) tell their registrars to point to:

    ns1.rsagona.com
    ns2.rsagona.com

    Here's my question. How do their registrars know the IP address of my server by just knowing ns1/ns2.rsagona.com?

    It can't have anything to do with the WHOIS info for rsagona.com, because rsagona.com is just a domain and the WHOIS info has nothing to do with the server. Granted rsagona.com is ALSO pointing to my server but that's just because I happen to be serving a "Welcome" screen if you go to rsagona.com


    (it's not really rsagona but you get the point).

    Can anyone explain this to a very confused individual?

    :wavey:
     
  2. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    It's Voodoo
     

  3. woodasptim

    woodasptim

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    Your name server feeds the information to your isp's name server who in turn feeds the information to their isp's name server. (Very simplistic description)

    http://www.howstuffworks.com/dns.htm
     
  4. vote Republican

    vote Republican White and nerdy Moderator

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    When you register your domain, you should have a place to enter the NS info. You can point it at your ISP, especially if it's subject to change, or directly at your own DNS server if it's a static IP & you have a publicly facing DNS server
     
  5. Tackle

    Tackle

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    Not exactly sure on your setup, but godaddy and the like will have a place for you to put in your name servers. Depending on your DNS, you'll also need to create A records for them.
     
  6. Deanster

    Deanster Cheese? Millennium Member CLM

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    When your domain was set up, either you or your provider created an A record with the registrar that matches ns1.rsagona1.com to an ip address. It's usually just a web page where you type in ns1 in one box, and xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx in another and hit submit.

    But it's really worthwhile to make sure you get it right the first time....:whistling:
     
  7. Deanster

    Deanster Cheese? Millennium Member CLM

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    Fwiw, it's also worthwhile to ensure that DNS is really working properly on any server you're responsible for. The full dns address should resolve both forward and backwards, or security software like Kerberos will throw an absolute fit, often without telling you why, and you'll start having mail server problems also.

    Google dns tools for a variety of sites that will check your setup.
     
  8. gwalchmai

    gwalchmai Lucky Member

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    iptools.com is your friend.
     
  9. rsagona1

    rsagona1 Hello

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    Ok, that I think answers my question. My registrar said they did that..something called an 'a entry'.
     
  10. Deanster

    Deanster Cheese? Millennium Member CLM

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    That's the one. A records are where DNS really takes place, in most ways.

    I guess the other big one is MX records, which point to a domain's mail server.

    The Wikipedia entries on these are pretty helpful, without getting mind-bendingly technical, unlike the larger entries on DNS.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MX_record