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Primers: regular vs. magnum?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by hogfish, May 8, 2010.


  1. hogfish

    hogfish
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    Hi, guys. If you want to hand load some .325 WSM rds., but don't have any magnum primers for a recipe that calls fore them, are there any safety reasons to not use regular primers, regardless of brand? Would this go for any other magnums also?

    Thanks.
     

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  2. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve
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    You'll be fine, but one of the reasons some recipes call for mag primers is to get a more consistent burn on slower powders... in your case with a short mag, I don't think it will be much impact at all. The only testing I've done is with .357 magnums... same powder charge and regular vs. mag primers resulted in 50 fps difference with accuracy being slightly better with the mag primers.

    No reason not to give it a try...
     

  3. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve
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    Of course, if the recipe calls for a regular primer and all you have is a magnum, then I'd be much more careful working up.
     
  4. hogfish

    hogfish
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    True dat! :rofl:

    I was thinking it might work better with the recipes for the 'faster' powders, like it might be better with IMR4350 data than with H1000 data, no?

    Thanks.
     
  5. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve
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    In theory I think it sounds right, but when you think of it in these terms:

    -short, fat powder column
    -fast(er) burning powder
    -heavy bullet

    It doesn't seem too promising in terms of performance vs other .325 mag loads. Just a guess... I've never loaded a short mag. What I'm really hoping for here is if I spout off enough theories, the thread will keep getting bumped to the top and someone that knows more than me will chime in. :embarassed:
     
  6. hogfish

    hogfish
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    I want to say that I've seen some data using regular primers for some powders, and magnum primers for others...all for the same bullet. Don't know if that would be the case for this particular cartridge. I'll look it up and see.

    Thanks.
     
  7. hogfish

    hogfish
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    Okay. The only data I found using regular and magnum primers for the same bullets but different powders is in Speer #14 and, not only for this cartridge, but for many that I skimmed through. Not sure what it means, though. I will quote a note from them:

    "Although 'magnum' often calls to mind the slow-burning rate propellants, the combination of case capacity and bore diameter in the 325 WSM means that the medium rate powders give excellent performance."

    :dunno:

    Later.
     
    #7 hogfish, May 8, 2010
    Last edited: May 8, 2010
  8. fredj338

    fredj338
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    Some slower powders @ higher volumn will need a mag rpimer for best ignition. I find I don't need a mag primer until I am over 70gr of a slower powder. Example, I get fine ignition using 44gr of imr4831 w/ a 140gr bullet in my 260. I also use 4831 in my 280, but I am using 54gr w/ a 160gr bullet, still no mag primer. When I go to a 400gr bullet in my 404jeffer, still using IMR4831, it gets a mag primer w/ it's 84gr charge. The 325wsm realyl only needs a mag primer if you are using ball powders IMO. Ball powders are denser, harder to ignite.
     
  9. dudel

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    Problem is that some magnum loads call for powders that have coatings that cause them to burn slower. They are harder to ignite, and therefore need a hotter primer. A lot will depend on powder density, charge weight, case volume, etc.

    Worst case is you get a hang fire, or a squib. Next problem is if you send another down the barrel with one stuck in it.
     
  10. hogfish

    hogfish
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    Thanks a lot, guys. It all makes sense now. Another one of those times when I assume something without thinking it through. I thought magnum cartridges depended on magnum primers by design.

    Thanks, again.
     
  11. fredj338

    fredj338
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    Magnum is just a name, it has little to do w/ the primer or even the load. It's about the powder & volumn of it, period. I always lean to std primers first, then will try mag primers to see if I get any benefit. OFten, the mag primer will prove to be less accurate w/ a powder that does NOT require q mag primer.:dunno:
     
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