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Prepping the Trigger During Drawstroke

Discussion in 'GATE Self-Defense Forum' started by Mayhem Inc., Mar 22, 2011.

  1. Mayhem Inc.

    Mayhem Inc.

    Aug 11, 2010
    Hello Mas,

    First off, its an honor to be able to ask and receive your input. I was talking to a tactical handgun instructor about the drawstroke, economy of motion and slimming down the process in order to facilitate a quicker shot on target from the draw.

    We discussed a very interesting technique of taking the slack out of the trigger, after clearing the holster, just as the firearm is rotating towards the adversary. I know this sounds like some form of handgun heresy or witchcraft, but I kept an open mind about it, and I could see how it would work. Granted, that most armed encounters will be at very close range, and the probability of balanced, sighted fire is slim... this technique could be quite useful to pull a shot off much quicker, much like shooting from half-hip/ the old speed rock.

    What are your thoughts?
  2. Mas Ayoob

    Mas Ayoob KoolAidAntidote Moderator

    Nov 6, 2005
    Not witchcraft, just a competition technique that has been around for a long time, and was briefly adapted into self-defense doctrine before a lot of us saw the flaws and got away from it.

    Please don't take this as me dissing your friend who teaches it. His students may be in a place where it's always draw-and-shoot for real. In this country, though, cop or civilian, you're far more likely to be drawing to take a suspect at gunpoint than drawing with a perceived need to shoot him the instant your gun comes on him.

    The trouble with prepping the trigger is that it makes it second nature for you to always fire when you draw...and firing automatically when the gun comes on target is not always the right thing to do in the field.