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Practice setups

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by RonS, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

    13,621
    3,506
    May 27, 1999
    Oh, USA
    Anyone have a home made setup for the plates?

    I considered building a frame and stapling paper plates to it, or just two targets side by side to practice transitions but interested in what others do.
     
  2. Justin1911

    Justin1911

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    21
    Feb 5, 2006
    Northeast GA
    I have a 6" white plate placed about 35 feet away in my basement. I just practice coming up and dry fire into it for the 1st shot. The smaller plate really does make a standard 8" plate seem much bigger when it's game time. That's about it, since we have several plate racks at my club to practice on.
     

  3. Melissa5

    Melissa5

    1,710
    25
    Feb 4, 2010
    NE Georgia
    I built this a few months ago.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. njl

    njl

    8,161
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    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    There are numerous sources for steel target plates on ebay. If you see one claiming to be AR400 1/4" thick, skip it. I bought some. They were cheap...but I haven't shot them much, and they're pitting. They've mostly been shot with 130gr BBI moly coated lead doing about 1000 fps.

    Cheapest setup is use whatever string is available to "run a clothes line" then hang paper plates from it. I used binder clips and strips of U-Haul packing tape. i.e. for each plate, attach an ~8" strip of tape to front of plate, fold in half, and attach to the back of the plate. Then use binder clips to hang each plate by the tape strip from the line. If it's windy, you can use tape and smaller binder clips to add some weight to the bottom of each plate. You don't get the instant feedback that steel gives, but you can at least get the transition practice of shooting from plate to plate.
     
  5. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

    6,927
    21
    Jan 3, 2009
    Smyrna, GA
    I do all my practice at an indoor range... one lane and one big cardboard target.
    And have shot plate times in the 15s for sure, maybe even 14s. Not super fast, but not shabby either.

    I just put two 8" targets on the cardboard backing. Practice coming up for that first shot, then a transition. Transitioning from one target to the second.... the real thing you just repeat a few more times.
     
  6. wazari

    wazari

    82
    0
    Jun 4, 2009
    Gaffney,SC
    I made this one with a hinge to fold it,so i could get it in
    my jeep. The plates are made out of the material used
    for political signs. I use white pasters to cover the holes.
    Works pretty well.

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
  7. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

    13,621
    3,506
    May 27, 1999
    Oh, USA
    Nice setup Melissa5.

    Thanks, I hadn't thought of hanging them from a line. I'm not going to try to do steel, I need to take them to the range, plus there will be other shooters there so I want to keep setup to a minimum so no one has to wait. The line idea I can work with, I can see how to do that quick and cheap and make it easily portable.

    Thanks to all.
     
  8. __jb

    __jb

    237
    0
    Aug 8, 2010
    Tampa Bay, FL
    [​IMG]

    http://pistol-training.com/drills/dot-torture

    This is a great marksmanship drill... Something you can do in a single lane of a standard shooting range... Go to the link above to read more about it and print out a full size image of the target...

    It's obviously not as slick as Melissa's setup, but it does provide a good drill... it is easy to carry... and it works well in a single lane at a shooting range...
     
  9. njl

    njl

    8,161
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    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    The biggest problem with the paper plates hanging from a line setup is wind. But you could solve that with something as simple as string taped to the back of the plates tied to a small weight or rock.
     
  10. TSAX

    TSAX USAF Vet

    10,162
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    Jun 5, 2010
    If I had a really big backyard, unlimited funds, no laws preventing me from shooting in my backyard then it would look like one of those IDPA, USPSA, IPSC courses







    :50cal:
     
  11. njl

    njl

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    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    I'd probably have at least 1 plate rack and maybe a dueling tree...oh, and a Texas star.
     
  12. Melissa5

    Melissa5

    1,710
    25
    Feb 4, 2010
    NE Georgia
    Thanks! The guy that owns the cow pasture behind my house told me that I could shoot on his property. I just recently added 2 of these.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. njl

    njl

    8,161
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    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    wow...that's overkill for a target stand. Assuming the ground isn't all rocks or frozen, a pair of these
    [​IMG]

    and a pair of 1x2s (acutally, 1 1x2x8 cut in half) with the bottom ends cut down to fit the spirals will do just fine holding cardboard targets. You can get the fishing rod holders from most WalMarts for pretty cheap.
     
  14. Melissa5

    Melissa5

    1,710
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    Feb 4, 2010
    NE Georgia
    njl, I had the wood left over from a previous project and was looking for something to do with it. The upright poles slide right out of the base so they can be easily replaced when shot up.
     
  15. njl

    njl

    8,161
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    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    I built something similar (simpler...google H-Frame target stand) a few years ago from a bunch of 2x4 scrap I got dumpster diving home construction sites. They were bulky enough, that I decided to paint them and leave them at the range (a members-only outdoor club). In no time, a couple disappeared (I'm guessing stolen by members), and the rest got all shot up. I'd even stapled the instructions so people would understand what they were in each bay where I left them. After that, the fishing rod holder idea hit me, and I've been using them ever since.
     
  16. Melissa5

    Melissa5

    1,710
    25
    Feb 4, 2010
    NE Georgia
    Yeah, I think someone else has been using my equipment, but I don't care as long as they don't steal it or shoot holes in the plates.
     
  17. cookselk

    cookselk

    266
    4
    Jan 28, 2009
    Nebraska
    For my paper targets I use two 12" spikes, two 6" pieces of 1 1/4" 160 PSI (thinwall) PVC, with two pieces of 4 ft. lath. I staple my cardboard target to the lath, insert the bottoms of the lath into the PVC, then stand the target up and insert the nails through the PVC and hammer them into the ground.

    I have three stands that will hold a 2x4 upright and three partial poppers that I had cut from scrap steel plate. The poppers are full size but are cut off just below the circle. I can't see that part anyway when I index on the popper with the pistol. The poppers are mounted on the 2x4 and I shoot in a ring and paint method. If you place a small spring between the popper and wood the ring is louder.

    For plates I use two of the above stands and two 2x4's with a steel bar across the top. I use 3 40" pieces of square tubular steel (2x2) with wooden stays bolted in the ends of two of them so I can quickly piece them together like a fishing rod. Then I just hang 6 8" round steel plates from large u-bolts and shoot in a ring and paint method.

    It would be better to have the plates flop over and thought about building a regular plate rack but all the above will fit into the trunk of my VW Jetta plus a box of shooting gear, chrono, pasters, tripod, rest, targets, and then my large midway bag plus I still have room if friends want to come along. I can set up the 5 to glock plus one other stage with what I have in my trunk. Two more stands plus two 2x4's I could do all three.