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Powder comparison chart

Discussion in '10mm Reloading Forum' started by gofastman, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
    Is there, or could we create, a powder comparison chart for various powders?

    I'm not talking about a burn rate chart.

    I'm just trying to make a way to put powders from various manufacturer into "classes"

    Example:

    800X~Longshot
    AA#7~Power Pistol
    AA#9~2400

    Am I making any sense here? :dunno:
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  2. preventec47

    preventec47

    265
    5
    May 2, 2010
    Atlanta, GA
    I sort of imagined Power Pistol to be more like AA#5
    and Blue Dot to be more like AA#7 at least in terms
    of burn rate. Then density must be considered but I
    not exactly sure as I now realize that some chemistries
    produce more energy per unit mass than others especially
    in some of the newer rifle powders.

    I dont think it ever will be possible to create any meaningful comparison charts unless we can do credible
    pressure testing. Afterall, that is really the bottom line
    ( along with velocity) I've tried to find out what a
    pressure testing setup would cost but cannot find
    any accurate info.

    Here is a pretty good comparison chart

    [​IMG]


     

    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012

  3. _The_Shadow

    _The_Shadow Ret. Fireman

    4,520
    21
    Jul 23, 2007
    Southeast, LoUiSiAna
    IMHO, I think LongShot would be on line with Blue Dot and 800X, why is because it is not a slow burning powder like AA#9
     
  4. gofastman

    gofastman

    496
    0
    Jan 29, 2010
    MN
    thats pretty close to what I was after, thanks!
     
  5. preventec47

    preventec47

    265
    5
    May 2, 2010
    Atlanta, GA
    To be honest, I personally placed Longshot in the chart
    because it was missing and I looked at the
    Hodgden created burn rate chart for
    their own powders. They show that they believe
    that Longshot is slower than HS7 and faster than
    Lil-Gun. Now since HS7 is discontinued ( isnt it ?),
    perhaps we should place Longshot where HS7 currently is. At least we should be able to trust a powder mfgr as to how their own powders compared to their other powders.
    I agree the relationships shown in the chart between
    different mfgrs powders create some questions in my
    mind but also solve some problems.

    I am not sure how I would test powders against one
    another for relative burn rate but one approach that
    comes to mind would be to take a given amount of powder
    of 4 or 5 different brands and take the amount of powder
    that would all shoot a 155gr bullet at say 1000fps

    Then we would take the exact same amount of powder
    and shoot 165gr bullets then 180 and then 200
    and plot the velocities of the heavier bullets. I think
    the slowest powders would have the fastest velocities
    as the bullets got heavier.

    Anyone have any other ideas on how to test burn rate ?

    Take at look at the chart at Hodgdon Website
    http://www.hodgdon.com/burn-rate.html

    Based on that, I think we should move both HS7 and Longshot up one
    space each.

    How bout the relative speeds of BlueDot vs 800X and AA#7 ?
    could they all be about the same ?

    Again, I dont know how we can test for burn rate.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  6. Yondering

    Yondering

    564
    1
    Dec 3, 2011
    You need to understand that "burn rate" depends on a number of variables, which aren't specified unless you can get the test specifications. Pressure is one variable; burn rate will change depending on pressure. Powder A may "burn slower" in a low pressure cartridge than Powder B, but when the pressure goes up, A might become faster than B.

    My thought is this: Don't worry about finding the perfect 10mm powder; it doesn't exist. We have lots of good powders that work well, and you should know which ones those are by this time. Try the best powders, and figure out which you like.
     
  7. Any Cal.

    Any Cal.

    442
    0
    Oct 27, 2008
    Along with what yondering said, some manufacturers measure burn rate in a fixed volume container, which can give relative burn rates, but then the relationship of one powder to another changes at different pressures and speeds.

    From the little I have gotten to play with Longshot, it seems to be pretty close to a perfect !)mm powder. Dense enough that you can use a variety of bullets, high energy, fairly clean, good pressure curve, and I haven't heard of it metering too poorly. Oh, and it is fairly economical as well. My only real beef with it is that it doesn't seem to work my comp very well with book loads.and that visually it is dificult to tell an under or over charged load from the next one.
     
  8. I checked that Hodgdon burn rate table 3 or 4 times, but can't find Vihtavuori N105 which is somewhere between V. 3N38 and V. N110. I noticed that because it's my favorite powder for 10mm/200gr loads.
     
  9. hubcap500

    hubcap500

    293
    14
    Jan 29, 2005
    Iowa
    Thanks for the chart. Very helpful and informative. Do you remember where you got it?

     
  10. preventec47

    preventec47

    265
    5
    May 2, 2010
    Atlanta, GA
    Yes I think I do remember.

    I think I need to move Longshot up beside Pro Reach and
    remove HS7 entirely since it was discontinued over five years ago.

    There are at least five different burn rate charts on the Internet
    but I think this is the overall best. It could be improved if the powder
    densities were listed along side each powder.


    PS it came from the Alliant website :) Alliant is part of a multi company
    gun related conglomerate called Western something something etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
  11. Yondering

    Yondering

    564
    1
    Dec 3, 2011
    I've noticed you seem to be really interested in powder density lately. Personally I don't think it's a very useful measure, unless you're trying to calibrate settings on a charge bar.

    Perhaps a more useful measurement would be "energy per volume", since that would tell more about the velocity potential, along with burn rate. Energy per volume doesn't correspond with density, because smokeless powders can be many different formulas, with different amounts of energy in each.
     
  12. preventec47

    preventec47

    265
    5
    May 2, 2010
    Atlanta, GA
    Yondering, you make a very good point as two grains
    of TNT has more explosive energy than five grains of
    black powder.

    But lets assume both of the above loads generated
    the same identical pressure and all powder was burned.
    The greater overall density load would produce the faster
    velocity because at the same internal bore pressure
    The extra mass of the gas produced (I think) would result
    in a more sustained and longer push on the bullet before
    pressures began to drop as the bullet traveled down the
    barrel. SO, I dont think density is completely irrelevant.
    I believe we can see examples of this with the AA#9
    powder because it is so much denser than any other mfgrs
    powder with close burning rates.
     
  13. Yondering

    Yondering

    564
    1
    Dec 3, 2011
    I see where you're coming from, but I disagree. Density doesn't correspond to burning rate or energy output very well.

    For example, there are many rifle powders that are much slower than AA9, but less dense. AA9 would give a shorter, faster burn than a rifle powder loaded to the same pressure limit, if you had a case with sufficient capacity.
     
  14. preventec47

    preventec47

    265
    5
    May 2, 2010
    Atlanta, GA
    I dont think I explained it very well. this has nothing to
    do with burn rate and and maybe is only indirectly associated with total energy. ( if the velocity of one load is greater than another cant we say that load has greater total energy? )

    I am just saying that a greater mass of gas vs a smaller mass of gas will push on the bullet longer and thus have a greater velocity. This is referred to in internal ballistics as greater area under the pressure curve.

    If all the powder burns in a case, then the heaviest charge will be converted to the greater mass of gas which will be identical in mass whether gaseous or solid.

    In my prior example, two different loadings that have
    the same peak pressure, the one with the greatest mass
    of gas will have the larger area under the pressure curve.
    ( and greatest velocity ... ALWAYS )

    The idea of rifle powders being either slower or less dense
    is just not relevant.
     
  15. Any Cal.

    Any Cal.

    442
    0
    Oct 27, 2008
    You are really over thinking it. Look in a manual and see what works best. Typically a heavy charge of slow powder gives the best velocity, but in a 10 the case capacity and barrel length limit the usefulness of the axiom. If you load to saami specs, it is only going to make a difference of a few fps between a good powder and the perfect one.
     
  16. Any Cal.

    Any Cal.

    442
    0
    Oct 27, 2008
    Here is a way to illustrate why I say that for the most part, you should just look in a manual.

    In a .44 Mag, there are a LOT of powders that can be used. Loaded to full pressure, with a 300g bullet, some good ones are #9, H110, MP300, 5744. Looking at the chart, you can see that they are all slow powders, and you may make some assumptions about them. You could look at powder density charts and see that #9 and H110 are almost identical. You may be able to find out on the net that H110 and MP300 are very, very similar.

    Once you start shooting though, H110 clocks the highest velocity. #9, which should have been similar, comes quite a ways behind. So does 5744. MP-300, I have read, doesn't do anything different. As it turns out, #9 just doesn't build the 'bang' that H110 does, 5744 is just too slow, and MP300 requires more case capacity for better results. Interestingly enough, in most manuals, H110 shows the best speed...

    When you go to the 10mm, the chart shows HS7, the precursor to Longshot, as 1 step above #9 in speed. When loading and shooting Longshot though, it behaves like a faster powder(more like 7625 than #9), using considerably lower charge weights to get more velocity. There are too many variables to pick out a powder by concentrating on one or two design parameters.
     
  17. scccdoc

    scccdoc

    1,394
    1
    Dec 28, 2011
    Any info on how "clean' various powders burn? DOC