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Polishing glock slide

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by operator81, Mar 29, 2008.

  1. Anyone done this? Pics and procedure would be great. Looked alot at polishing the barrel on my G26, and since the finish on the slide is the older matte gray, figured I'd look into polishing it.
     
  2. GMAN40

    GMAN40 OIF Vet. 04-05

    1,448
    0
    Apr 25, 2005
    US of A
    I've polished my barrels and they look sharpe, but as far as doing the slides I wouldn't! Even polishing the barrels will devalue the gun if you should ever want trade it in at a gun shop.
     


  3. GlockMan40s&w

    GlockMan40s&w MS Glocker

    184
    0
    Apr 10, 2005
    Down South
    Here's a brief description on polishing your barrel, everyone here who has done it, may do it differently.

    Tools:
    [​IMG]

    I use the sponge sandpaper from 3M, rub the barrel, until the finish starts fading, then add some mother's polish to the sponge,rub barrel until all of the finish is gone.

    then i use my dremel tool, with a polishing pad, and place mother's polish on the barrel and just keep polishing until you get the desire results. Wipe down the barrel when you get done.


    Far as the slide, I would just get it refinish. Brad @ CCR did my slide for under 50 bucks, he had a special going on last year.

    Web site:http://www.ccrrefinishing.com/
    e-mail him and tell him, you seen his work on glock talk and he may give you a price break, never hurts to ask.

    Several pics of glocks I've done.

    [​IMG]
    .357 Sig
    [​IMG]
    My 19
    [​IMG]
     
  4. mikegun

    mikegun

    2,831
    2
    Jun 22, 2006
    colorado
    you want to be careful polishing glock slides, i have seen some, not many, come out with a yellowing hue, something to do with metal on the slides involved, ive seem 5 come out like this...
     
  5. Bushflyr

    Bushflyr ʇno uıƃuɐɥ ʇsnɾ Millennium Member

    3,524
    0
    Mar 17, 1999
    Western WA
    I had one slide that I just hit with a wire wheel. Kind of a satin nickel sort of effect. The Tenifer was still intact, but the black phosphate was all gone. Looked pretty slick.
     
  6. Bushflyr

    Bushflyr ʇno uıƃuɐɥ ʇsnɾ Millennium Member

    3,524
    0
    Mar 17, 1999
    Western WA
    The light isn't very good, but here's one. It gets to be sort of a dull steel grey. Ignore the FrankenGlockness and the grease spots.:supergrin:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Ic3man360

    Ic3man360

    2
    0
    Apr 4, 2008
    I'm not an advertiser for Todd at customizedcreationz, but I've been interested in getting a glock slide polished also...

    here's a pic he sent of a glock slide he just finished...
    (here's hoping that I can embed correctly)

    <a href="http://s187.photobucket.com/albums/x157/ic3man_360/?action=view&current=polished_glock_slide_smaller_size_e.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x157/ic3man_360/polished_glock_slide_smaller_size_e.jpg" border="0" alt="Polished Glock Slide"></a>

    Edit: I'm sure that you can get a "close to professional" polish job like todd's with alot of work and the required tools....If I can't spare the $75 to get mine polished, then I'ma try the DIY approach...
     
  8. g29cc

    g29cc Custom Work

    412
    0
    Dec 5, 2007
    Michigan
    Thanks for the Plug !:supergrin:

    I also do barrels, guide rods, controls and more. Here are a couple of barrels pictures. I also do the engraving on the barrels or slides if you like as well. Full CNC shop services for gunsmithing or your custom projects as well.

    You can get similiar results with alot of elbow grease, a very understanding laundry person ( IE your wife or girlfriend ) and some place you dont mind totally trashing out with black crap off the buffing wheels.

    To totally polish a slide like the one above you need several different buffing wheels ( sprial sewn or even a sisal wheel, flannel cotten loose wheels ) several compounds and a pretty good buffing machine. You can get away with a 1/2 hp 6" grinder , but it wont live long under the stress you ll put it under. Buffing and polishing is a extremely dirty art form. There are certain techniques you need to know and things you learn along the way with certain materials and what not. Not properly knowing what your doing can cause uneven removal of material and you dont want that in certain areas. But if you just want to remove the black and have a decent nice looking surface give her a shot with some buffs and compounds, just becareful not to remove too much material ( you ll have to work at it to remove too much on stainless ), but you can do it ).

    Here are some pictures of my latest works.

    Thanks again
    Todd
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. g29cc

    g29cc Custom Work

    412
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    Dec 5, 2007
    Michigan
    [​IMG]

    Here is a mirror finish, you wont get this without alot of work and the right tools though. This is the slide above in the magazine picture reflection.
     
  10. JMS

    JMS 02

    13,411
    3,539
    May 6, 2007
    DIY will not come out like the above, even my brother in law who's a jeweler said that he could not get it to the same level as above. Question for Todd, are the slide 'cuts' (towards the left under the rear sight) black or is it just a reflection off the magazine/angle??
     
  11. Ic3man360

    Ic3man360

    2
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    Apr 4, 2008
    ...were you trying to disagree with me? Sorry, but I wasn't sure if you were or not... :p
    anyway...
    As I said and Todd agreed, DYI will *not* look like that glock slide unless you have the right tools, technique, and patience....I stated that it would look "close to professional", and this also was backed by Todd...it would take much work to achieve that fine of a finish...
     
  12. g29cc

    g29cc Custom Work

    412
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    Dec 5, 2007
    Michigan
    They are a left unpolished, I try to lightly polish that area to keep the grip there. In some cases the customer wants this area recut in a more aggressive type grip. I do a wavy type cut and a slanted back cut , or the regular style straight cuts on the glock as well. I ve also done the cuts on the front of the slide too.

    But to simply answer the its some of the magazine, some of the rough surface left ( the stiple like surface ) that makes it look a little darker. I think I have a better picture of that area and I ll try and post it.

    I can if someone wants the grip area polished to look all even take the time to sand that area down and prep it. But that takes alot of work and time and the price is more to do that.

    I have two other slides I ll post some pictures of soon. I just have to get them cropped and stuff and then up on the website for hosting and then I ll post them here.

    Thanks everyone
    Todd
     
  13. isecobra

    isecobra

    54
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    Mar 17, 2008
    Todd's work looks great, plan on sending mine to him monday, has anyone had him do anywork for them?
     
  14. Bushflyr

    Bushflyr ʇno uıƃuɐɥ ʇsnɾ Millennium Member

    3,524
    0
    Mar 17, 1999
    Western WA
    That's some dead sexy polishing. A question for Todd: Is that polished through the Tenifer to raw metal, or will the surface of the Tenifer take that high gloss?
     
  15. g29cc

    g29cc Custom Work

    412
    0
    Dec 5, 2007
    Michigan
    I ve done a bunch of work on GT here. Lots of people's barrels and stuff.

    I ll be honest and say I am a machinist. I am familiar with all kinds of coatings and surface preps ( I also chrome plate ). As far as this tenifer that others talk about, I am not sure of its depth of penetration. Other say its deep into the metal, some say its just a surface prep. But all I can say is that the slides I ve done, have never had an issue with finish problems. There is nothing to peel of flake off or discolor ( unless you spill something on it that would discolor a stock glock slide too, your probably more protected with the polished slide due to its improved surface ). You can easily clean and keep the polish with 5 minutes of your favorite white color chrome polish ( or blue colored ) and a soft flannel.

    Thanks everyone and here is a few words about the Tenifer and Carbonizing.

    "Tenifer is a trademarked name for the end result of a chemical bath nitriding process that embeds nitrogen into an iron-containing alloy to create a corrosion-resistant finish that is a dull grey in color and extremely hard. The generic term for this type of process is carbonitriding. Other trade names for carbonitriding include Melonite, Sursulf, Arcor, Tufftride, and Koline."

    "Carbonitriding is a modern metallurgical surface treatment that can be applied to steel to increase the metal's abrasion resistance and impact strength. Carbonitriding can be applied to economical and free-machining low carbon steels, yet the resulting surface properties can approach those of more expensive and difficult-to-work grades of steel.[1]

    Carbonitriding can be classified as a modification of gas carburization, as opposed to a form of nitriding. The process adds ammonia molecules into the gas carburizing atmosphere, and will therefore add nitrogen to the carburized case. Atomic Nitrogen is formed at the surface which thereafter diffuses into the steel along with the carbon. Carbonitriding (around 850 °C / 1550 °F) is carried out at temperatures substantially higher than plain nitriding (around 530 °C / 990 °F) but slightly lower than those used for carburizing (around 950 °C / 1700 °F) and for shorter times. Carbonitriding is thus not only more economical than carburizing, but also reduces distortion during quenching. The lower temperature allows oil quenching, or even gas quenching with a protective atmosphere.

    Carbonitriding forms a hard, wear resistant case that is approximately 0.075 – 0.75 mm thick, and generally has a better hardenability than a carburized case. The preferred case depth is determined by the service application, and the thicker the case, the greater the increase in wear resistance and hardness the part will have. Because the carbonitriding is affecting only the top layers of the steel, and not depositing an additional layer, it does not significantly alter the dimensions of the part. The case depth is restricted to 0.75mm for two reasons: the lower temperature of the treatment which restricts the diffusion of the two species, and the shorter times of the treatment. The primary reason that short times are employed is to restrict the concentration of nitrogen as nitrogen addition is more difficult to control than carbon; an excess of nitrogen can cause high levels of retained austenite and porosity, which are undesirable in producing a part of high hardness.

    Carbonitriding also has other advantages over carburizing; it has a greater resistance to softening during tempering and increased fatigue and impact strength. It is possible to use both carbonitriding and carburizing together to form optimum conditions of deeper case depths and therefore performance of the part in industry. This method is applied particularly to steels with low case hardenability, such as the seat of the valve. The process applied is initially carburizing to the required case depth (up to 2.5mm) at around 900-955°C, and then carbonitriding to achieve required carbonitrided case depth. The parts are then oil quenched, and the resulting part has a harder case than possibly achieved for carburization, and the addition of the carbonitrided layer increases the residual compressive stresses in the case such that the contact fatigue resistance and strength gradient are both increased.

    Certain pre-industrial case hardening processes include not only carbon-rich materials such as charcoal, but nitrogen-rich materials such as urine, which implies that traditional surface hardening techniques also involved carbonitriding."
     
  16. ShaneS

    ShaneS Millennium Member

    1,376
    40
    Oct 22, 1999
    Greater D/FW Texas, USA
    Does highly polishing the barrel change the dimensions/tolerances much?
     
  17. g29cc

    g29cc Custom Work

    412
    0
    Dec 5, 2007
    Michigan
    Yep sure have mic'ed before and after and well within tolerance of a factory part that is by spec in some areas not dimensionally concentric , or parallel either.

    So here is an example.

    EFK and Sig barrel outside width of flats

    .657 sig factory
    .648 EFK factory

    EFK and Sig barrel outside width of OD barrel

    .550 Sig factory
    .547 EFK factory

    Here are some pictures of a barrel I just ran out and half polished an area to show the Caliper in picture , NO DIFFERENCE IN MEASUREMENT !!!

    Lower area outside barrel od of polished surface

    .5325


    Upper area outside barrel od of unpolished BLUED surface

    .5325


    Polished area was .5325 before polishing as well.

    Does it remove metal in some case yes it will remove .0003-.0008 and possibly on a high side .001. But even in that range, look at the difference between the EFK barrel and a Sig factory barrel dimension. Those are measurement from my own 229 barrel and a customer's EFK barrel in front of me. Why do I bother to measure things and write them down. Just pure curiosity to what machine tolerances are between companies and what not. Or if someone asks me why I think a certain company is better then another, I ll tell them, with all the barrels I ve done from XX company, they were all within .001 of each other, or they were all way out .008 from each other or from side to side.

    So basically in a nut shell , STOP FIRING YOUR GUN RIGHT NOW. Your unevenly machining your surfaces every time you pull the trigger !! LOL Seriously though,with every trigger pull you cause friction , which in turn will remove material over time. In essence again, a well broken in gun shoots smoother , has less malfunctions then a new gun ( well we know Sigs dont malfunction ). Race guns are fit and polished to a very fine degree. They are not extremely loose such as service guns. If a service gun was super tight, there would be problems ( ahem... M16 vs AK 47 )

    So while polishing may remove a inSIGnificant amount of material, its nothing that will hurt performance , and in 99.9 % of all cases improves greatly the performance.

    Removing a surface such as blueing is so small that the factory doesnt even take in account for this in their tolerances for machining. If the factory had to take this into account and the tolerances were that tight to begin with, your gun would cost 4 times what it does now.

    So again, yep I am a machinist and here is your pics of before and after as you requested. I ll further back up anything else I do as well with more hard facts and pictures if you would like.

    And dont worry everyone I dont take offense to questions like this. I would rather have everyone understand the workings behind what is being done. If I can educate you in the process of what I am doing to further make you feel confident in what your having done, then please feel free to ask. I am super busy and might not get a chance to email or respond quickly , but will do my best.