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Playing it safe in NY & NJ

Discussion in 'Tri State Glockers' started by Notyet, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. Notyet

    Notyet

    134
    0
    Jul 28, 2009
    Connecticut
    To get to any GSSF match in the Northeast you have to drive into or through New York or New Jersey. With their restrictive laws this seems to be a real risk. Can you limit this risk by carrying your gun in a locked case in the trunk of your car and separating the ammunition from the gun case and replacing your 15 round magazines with 10 rounders?
     

  2. :popcorn:

    I would say no.

    Ship the gun would be my suggestion.

    Not sure how accurate this is, and I am no way saying to do this.

    from
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/13624979/New-York-State-Gun-Laws


    NON-RESIDENTS
    It is unlawful for any person to carry, possess or transport a handgun in or through the state unless he has a valid New York license. (A provision of federal law provides a defense to state or local laws which would prohibit the passage of persons with frearms in interstate travel if the person is traveling from any place where he may lawfully possess and transport a frearm to any other place where he may lawfully possess and transport such frearm and the frearm is unloaded and in the trunk. In vehicles without a trunk, the unloaded frearm shall be in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console).
    A member or coach of an accredited college or university target pistol team may transport a handgun into or through New York to participate in a collegiate, Olympic or target pistol shooting competition provided
     

    Last edited: Mar 21, 2011

  3. NYC recently had a criminal case against an individual from a free state who made the mistake of leaving his firearm in his vehicle and travelling here thrown out. I'll see if I can find the link. I believe the defendant was from FL.
     
  4. AlexHassin

    AlexHassin

    2,033
    2
    Dec 15, 2010
    Taiwan
    I think the deal is if you are only on the highway and don’t leave it or spend the night you are covered under a federal protection. also has to be locked up unloaded with ammo stored separately. i am not a lawyer
     
  5. TSAX

    TSAX USAF Vet

    10,162
    7
    Jun 5, 2010
    Have you checked with the NRA or BATFE on transporting in that area
     
  6. dvrdwn72

    dvrdwn72

    1,205
    1
    Nov 26, 2010
    Even though federal law says you can,, New Jersey would most certainly lock you up if caught. Just thinking of the idea gives me diarrhea.
     
  7. James Dean

    James Dean

    2,247
    11
    Jan 31, 2010
    East of Eden
    Agreed NJ needs to lock the wrong guy up with a lot of money who can fight in court. I know the state owns most of the state judges, but NJ needs to be fought in Federal court.
     
  8. Coulda swore I posted this before...

    NYS PL 265 -Firearms and other dangerous weapons:

    13. Possession of pistols and revolvers by a person who is a
    nonresident of this state while attending or traveling to or from, an
    organized competitive pistol match or league competition under auspices
    of, or approved by, the National Rifle Association and in which he is a
    competitor, within forty-eight hours of such event or by a person who is
    a non-resident of the state while attending or traveling to or from an
    organized match sanctioned by the International Handgun Metallic
    Silhouette Association and in which he is a competitor, within
    forty-eight hours of such event, provided that he has not been
    previously convicted of a felony or a crime which, if committed in New
    York, would constitute a felony, and further provided that the pistols
    or revolvers are transported unloaded in a locked opaque container
    together with a copy of the match program, match schedule or match
    registration card. Such documentation shall constitute prima facie
    evidence of exemption, providing that such person also has in his
    possession a pistol license or firearms registration card issued in
    accordance with the laws of his place of residence. For purposes of this
    subdivision, a person licensed in a jurisdiction which does not
    authorize such license by a person who has been previously convicted of
    a felony shall be presumed to have no prior conviction. The
    superintendent of state police shall annually review the laws of
    jurisdictions within the United States and Canada with respect to the
    applicable requirements for licensing or registration of firearms and
    shall publish a list of those jurisdictions which prohibit possession of
    a firearm by a person previously convicted of a felony or crimes which
    if committed in New York state would constitute a felony.
    13-a. Except in cities not wholly contained within a single county of
    the state, possession of pistols and revolvers by a person who is a
    nonresident of this state while attending or traveling to or from, an
    organized convention or exhibition for the display of or education about
    firearms, which is conducted under auspices of, or approved by, the
    National Rifle Association and in which he is a registered participant,
    within forty-eight hours of such event, provided that he has not been
    previously convicted of a felony or a crime which, if committed in New
    York, would constitute a felony, and further provided that the pistols
    or revolvers are transported unloaded in a locked opaque container
    together with a copy of the convention or exhibition program, convention
    or exhibition schedule or convention or exhibition registration card.
    Such documentation shall constitute prima facie evidence of exemption,
    providing that such person also has in his possession a pistol license
    or firearms registration card issued in accordance with the laws of his
    place of residence. For purposes of this paragraph, a person licensed in
    a jurisdiction which does not authorize such license by a person who has
    been previously convicted of a felony shall be presumed to have no prior
    conviction. The superintendent of state police shall annually review the
    laws of jurisdictions within the United States and Canada with respect
    to the applicable requirements for licensing or registration of firearms
    and shall publish a list of those jurisdictions which prohibit
    possession of a firearm by a person previously convicted of a felony or
    crimes which if committed in New York state would constitute a felony.