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Patterning shotgun

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by RWBlue, Aug 24, 2014.

  1. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

    23,521
    832
    Jan 24, 2004
    I am trying to work out something.

    With every shotgun patterning slightly differently....
    With all the different loads...


    Has anyone stepped off a good kill and then gone back and patterned that load on paper?

    I am thinking how many shot pellets does it really take to kill an animal. And then we have the lucky animals which get away when they were well in range. And then we have the lucky shots where the animal drops at a range we should not have take a shot. And this doesn't take into count the shots where one pellet hit the animal in the head.

    If possible, I would love to have everyone step off the normal distance you take shots, then shoot a paper plate with your standard load at that distance. Include distance, load, choke, count the holes in the plate, and photo of paper plate.

    I need to do the same with my guns. Assuming I can find some place to do this, what distances should I test?
     
  2. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

    23,521
    832
    Jan 24, 2004
    Sometimes I can predict the future. The following link came in my email today.

    [ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6SVIgsJ3F8&feature=youtu.be&list=PL3B81888B0F11EDC8"]Choosing the Right Shotgun Choke - 3-Gun - YouTube[/ame]

    So basically the same thing, but for hunting.
     


  3. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

    5,116
    829
    Oct 19, 2006
    Doh ?
    Our club has a large steel plate you paint with wheel bearing grease with a paint roller. There is a 2" diameter x 1/2" length of pipe welded to the center to give you the same point of aim for every shot.

    You can pattern your chokes and determine approximate percentage above POI and below POI as well as approximate effective diameter of pattern at a given range.

    The larger area will give you a better idea of pattern than a paper plate.
     
  4. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

    9,577
    1,039
    Aug 7, 2003
    Louisville KY
    I pattern my hunting guns and HD guns all the time. When I find a choke/shell combination that gives me a pattern density I'm happy with at various ranges I stop and buy a couple of flats of that ammo if not more.

    I like to use picnic table paper that comes in a big roll....its like 36" wide and 90 feet long or some such. I get it at Sams and take a Sharpie tied to a string and make my 30" circles with a small dot sticky target for the center.

    You will be surprised how many different shells throw patterns with holes in one gun and efficient patterns in another.

    You shoot these standing up BTW...
     
  5. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

    23,521
    832
    Jan 24, 2004
    But that is my question, what pattern density makes you happy?
     
  6. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

    23,521
    832
    Jan 24, 2004
    Yes, but not everyone has assess to a larger target, AND a paper plate is big enough for most animals vitals.

    Yes, a turkey head is small.
    Yes, you can put an entire rabbit on a paper plate. This is especially true if the rabbit has been cooked.....but I digress.
    Yes, a goose is larger than a paper plate, but the body vitals fit on a paper plate.
    It is even true for people.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2014
  7. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

    9,577
    1,039
    Aug 7, 2003
    Louisville KY
    It depends on what I'm shooting and at what range.

    For example. I might be interested in using 00 buck for home defense. So I shoot it at the ranges I most likely expect to encounter. And I look at the pattern that gives me a nice spread and then I shoot it at extended ranges just to see how it performs if I ever needed to use it at those ranges. So inside the house at say 5 yards I might be looking for a 4 inch pattern while at 10 yards I'm looking for a 8 inch pattern. It just depends.

    When it comes to game you have to visualize the animal you are shooting and look at the pattern and ask yourself--if I shot a dove with this load is it likely he would escape un-shot?

    With a turkey you want a tight little group because you shoot them in the head. So a pattern that only allows for a single pellet to the head of a turkey would have to be very lucky for it to be a killing shot. With a dove you are OK if you hit a wing with a single pellet. See the difference?

    With a deer you shoot it at 40 yards and get two or three buckshot in the target you are good!