close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Out of 9.....

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Gareth68, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. Atlas

    Atlas transmogrifier

    12,512
    12
    Oct 1, 2001
    north of the equator
    We gave the task of educating the children to central government..
    What result were you expecting?
     
  2. concretefuzzynuts

    concretefuzzynuts Brew Crew

    7,476
    13
    Dec 27, 2011
    PNW
    I am worried for my grandchildren.
     

  3. Rustin

    Rustin

    1,839
    41
    Oct 12, 2011
    Central Ohio
    I find it more shocking that people have no idea what socialism is. Everything I learned about history in school was diluted or otherwise swept under the rug. If anyone has any reccomendations for a book on history, the way it actually happened, I would love to hear suggestions.
     
  4. Haldor

    Haldor Formerly retired EE. Back to being a wage slave.

    8,535
    1,549
    Oct 22, 2006
    Central Arizona
    That is truly sad. The fall of the Berlin Wall (and the Soviet Block that it symbolized) was the most important event of the 2nd half of the 20th Century. It was more important than the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis or the Vietnam War. It was even more important than the '60s music and sexual revolution.

    For more than 30 years we had lived with the threat of nuclear annihilation hanging over our heads and this is the event that finally ended it. You couldn't know because you didn't live through it, but I never expected to live to be 40 and I was hardly alone in this.

    I fully expected some incident or accident to lead to a civilization ending war. Compared to that oppressive menace, the problems of today seem trivial. Housing and economy meltdown? No big deal, at least we aren't all going to die in a ball of fire or starve to death in the aftermath.

    If my generation seems a bit odd then consider what we learned to compartmentalize and ignore. 99 Luft Balloons was not singing about going to a party.

    [ame]http://youtu.be/9whehyybLqU[/ame]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/99_Luftballons
     
  5. Tackle

    Tackle

    953
    248
    Jul 5, 2011
    Yes A business college. Going by the OP's poll, it shows I'm not alone.

    I wouldn't say it makes me less intelliget. We are all unique and know/retain different information.

    In all honesty, I will be able to go through life without knowing quite a bit of history and i will be just fine. I can't name all the presidents either.
     
  6. Dennis in MA

    Dennis in MA Get off my lawn

    42,700
    2,811
    Aug 16, 2001
    Taunton, MA
    No. It haz todally faled us! Fale fale fale! Name won persom on this 4um that is smurt and was ejakaded in Merica.
     
  7. Louisville Glocker

    Louisville Glocker Urban Redneck

    2,290
    27
    Dec 17, 2010
    Louisville, KY
    Yeah, the "did not have history in college" does disturb me. I was a physics major, but still managed to have an intensive year long Humanities class, plus two History classes (plus political science, philosophy and some things I'm forgetting).

    Learning history is extremely important, because human behavior is such that it tends to repeat itself. Studying the past helps us prepare for the future and make good decisions in the present. I was blessed to be taught by a great historian, who taught us not just to read the history, but to research who the authors of those writings were, and always consider their perspective. For when you read a history book, it tells you not just some facts, but it gives you insight into the author and their society as well. Complex stuff...

    Lifelong learner here. My oldest son is in public schools in Louisville and just got into the Advanced Program. Basically, a different track which then funnels you into magnet middle schools and then top high schools. I know I'm in Kentucky, but we've got a couple amazingly good public high schools in town. I'm super happy he rocked his test and got on the right track. Teacher quality, high expectations, and a high level of fellow students are all important in my opinion.

    And of course hard work, and a good work ethic. My kiddo loves math and science, but I'll guarantee he'll be studying his history too!!!
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2013
  8. Dennis in MA

    Dennis in MA Get off my lawn

    42,700
    2,811
    Aug 16, 2001
    Taunton, MA
    Seriously. . .

    I went to B-school. Took a year of history. It was basically 2 semesters trying to pack in 10,000 years of time. Too short. You can't learn it all.

    I don't think this is a failing of our education system. Is EVERYONE supposed to remember Gorby? Probably not. Chang Kai Sheck? Definitely not. (I only know him from playing Trivial Pursuit in HS 30 years ago.)

    From (your definition of) the dawn of man to about 150 years ago, history is easy. Once you get into an era that is within 2 generations of today, the important facts become cloudy.

    I remember in History class in HS learning about JFK. Is that bad? No. Should it have been no more than 5 min in one class? Yes. (And it was a whole class and most of a chapter.) We spent more time on Kennedy than on WWII. Because the writers of the History text thought the thing that happened to THEM was more important than the thing that happened to their dads. I think we devoted more time to Vietnam than WWI or WWII.

    So looking back on recent history is hard. How many textbooks and classes will talk of Obama in the next 15 years? A lot, I bet. Is he significant because of accomplishments? Nope. But it's recent and since i experienced it, it must be relevant.



    All that said. . . I am in my mid-40's and learned more history from my grandparents, watching PBS and taking tours of Boston than anything I ever learned in school.
     
  9. Louisville Glocker

    Louisville Glocker Urban Redneck

    2,290
    27
    Dec 17, 2010
    Louisville, KY
    Some, yes. But not that many. Our college and universities have to give preferential admissions to US students, or most of them would be filled with better qualified foreign applicants. Our K-12 system is doing a poor job.
     
  10. Both my sons graduated high school in the last few years. i was amazed at how the local school system here completely ignored US history, and anything to do with civics. Those kids were seniors before they heard of any history and didn't know jack about our constitution or how our government works.

    The only history they got was that Martin Luther King Jr was literally Jesus Christ and walked on water (that came right out of the gate in first grade) and how evil white men were for killing all the indians. Other than that, nothing. They never even told them who Abraham Lincoln was. Terrible.
     
  11. jason10mm

    jason10mm NRA-GOA-TSRA

    2,038
    117
    Jan 27, 2001
    Clarksville, TN
    The real question is, what are YOU, as parents, doing to correct this? History can be learned from a book. Are your kids given reading assignments at home? Do you talk to them about historical topics important to you? Do they have easy access to history books appropriate to their interests and reading level?

    Schools can't teach everything YOU think is important. As a parent you have the lion's share of the responsibility to raise an educated and well rounded citizen.
     
  12. Z71bill

    Z71bill

    15,862
    2,987
    Feb 19, 2007
    Texas
    Ask the same 9 people who - Honey Boo Boo or Snookie or some jerk wad on The Bachelor is and they will be able to tell you every freaking detail about them.

    :upeyes:
     
  13. skinny99

    skinny99 Crew Chief

    603
    0
    Oct 30, 2011
    Deltona,FL
    Our education system is definitely in need of reform. The liberal education attitude with programs like no child left behind, focus on standardized testing and the constant teaching to the lowest common denominator is holding back the truly intelligent. I think it breaks down like this. The top 20% of students are as bright or brighter than the past, the bottom 30% are just as ignorant as always. No more,no less. However I think the middle 50% are being dumbed down. They have very little real knowledge. All they are really learning is how to pass tests. The knowledge goes in one ear and out the other as soon as the test is over.
     
  14. LL6

    LL6

    1,546
    0
    Feb 22, 2010
    Off I-40, NC
    It's all about the soundbite.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2013
  15. Channel 1
     
  16. mikeflys1

    mikeflys1 Pastafarian

    3,649
    8
    Jun 19, 2007
    CT
    Yea, I don't doubt it.

    I just went and looked at the degree requirements for my school and for a non-history major, you could potentially graduate with only 3 credits (1 course) of history.
     
  17. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

    22,865
    7,755
    Dec 21, 2002
    Texas
    No offense but you sound like a 10 year old, "Why do I have to learn that stuff, I'll never use it".

    As a young person you have no clue what will benefit you in later life.
    Very few people's lives go as they plan. One day something happens and you are going in a completely different direction.

    Personally, I maxed out everything I attempted in life, with the help of stuff I learned early but was sure I was never going to use.


    Why do you think the government, companies, powerful people, keep secrets?
    Smart people know "knowledge is power".
     
  18. Me either because they dont teach history anymore...my kid is in 7th grade..he has never been taught basic American history in school. the closest they have come so far was Geography and he had to learn states and capitals..he didnt have a single science class until last year 6th grade either. They are more worried about if these kids can do and know algebra in 5th grade that I didnt get or do until 8th grade..and well thats about it..only homework he ever seems to have is Math and Spelling...This year in History they are finally starting on just a bit of stuff(they are studying about Pyramids and ancient Egypt right now) But as far as AMERICAN history or current world history NOTHING.
     
  19. Tackle

    Tackle

    953
    248
    Jul 5, 2011
    None taken, I don't get upset from randoms on the internet. That was not my intention, sounding like a 10 year old. That's not my mentality either. I know it wouldn't hurt to learn more, it never does.

    On the other hand, I know quite a bit about current cyber threats that most people don't know about or understand. Security breaches which include thousands of users CC #'s and accounts are revealed. Do most users know the actions that are being taken and how it can effect them personally? Maybe, maybe not. It's not their fault for not knowing and I'm not going to knock them for it.

    Staying well informed is how you stay ahead of the game, whether it's past, current or future.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2013
  20. Oh, it is! Stupidity is a virtue because it doesn't endanger the self-esteem of the mentally challenged.

    Wouldn't want people feeling bad, would we?