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Opinons on a hunting dog

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by mpol777, Jan 20, 2004.

  1. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

    1,680
    0
    Jul 23, 2001
    Cochise County, AZ
    A co-worker of mine is getting rid of his dog. His wife never wanted a dog and it seems he lost the battle. It is a pure bred Visla. About 1.5 years old.

    I was really holding out for a Brittney Spaniel, but this one is FREE to a good home. It may be a few years before I can afford a Brittney from a good line. I don't know very much about Vislas so I'm wondering if this is a good breed for upland birds.
     
  2. aspen

    aspen

    8
    0
    Apr 16, 2003
    I have bever worked with a Visla but I have heard alot of good things about them. I looked at them before I got my last dog. As it turned out I did not have much say. My wife got me a Brit for Christmas. She liked the Brit because of their smaller size. I am hooked on Britneys. I have only taken her out in the field a few times but she is doing great.

    Do you know the dog. Has the owner started traing the dog. All pointingUpland dogs are on he high strung side which is good in the field but can make home life trying. Good luck and Good hunting.

    http://www.huntingvizsla.org

    Tom
     


  3. Depends on breeding stock, but generally they make good upland hunting dogs and have great noses. I would take it if it has no bad habits, within reason. Also did he use the dog for hunting at all? Take a pheasant wing on a rod and see if the dog points. The object is not to let the dog get the wing just to see if it points. Esox357
     
  4. Craigster

    Craigster

    123
    0
    Dec 15, 2002
    Wa. State
    In my opinion while choosing a house/hunting dog, temperament is the most important factor followed by its hunting instincts. I wouldn’t own the best hunting dog in history if he tore up the house and couldn’t be trained to get along. Dogs are individuals and each ones tempermint is the result of its breading and environment.

    For example we have been raising and hunting regestered Britts for many years and presently own two. Our dogs have all been gentel, calm, great hunters and companions. Iv posted many pics here, both my daughters own Britts, my next door neighbor has one and we just had a litter, our 7th generation. So you can tell we love them, however I have seen and worked with a few "registered" Britts that I wouldn’t own if the owner paid me.


    RED FLAG in your case...Despite his wife’s original objection, the fact that in a year and a half this dog could not earn a welcome in there home would greatly concern me…….. My opinion would be the same if it were a Britt.

    IM sure there are many fine Vislas out there but if I were you I would be very careful about your decision on this dog.


    Free might be a VERY bad deal.
     
  5. tjpet

    tjpet

    1,843
    2
    May 14, 2001
    Utah-Idaho border
    I grew up shooting over Hungarian visla's, German shorthairs, and Brittney spaniels. Although all worked fine I'd give the edge to the shorthairs for general upland work. They were more aggressive and had better noses.

    You won't go wrong picking up the visla, especially for free. It'll give you good service if properly trained.
     
  6. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

    1,680
    0
    Jul 23, 2001
    Cochise County, AZ
    Knowing this guy, I'm sure he dropped a bundle on the dog, so it should be from a pretty good line. He's co-owner of the company and has a different concept of money than peons like myself, so I'm not worried about the free part.

    I'm going to go meet the pooch tonight and see how he reacts to our other dogs. It's definately a no-go if he can't play well with others. If that goes well it's thinking time.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  7. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

    1,680
    0
    Jul 23, 2001
    Cochise County, AZ
    Met the dog last night and he is a great dog. Very smart and already has some basic skills. The only thing is that he is a dominant dog. I put the rotty in with him first and he made her submit in no time. Which is pretty easy since she's a wuss. I tried the german shepherd next and it didn't work out. The only dogs that dominate over the german shepherd are the chihuahuas (go figure). Dutch (the visla) would not give it up and things got a little nasty. No harm, no foul, just not a good match.

    It's a shame too becuase Dutch would be a good addition. I guess things work out for a reason though.