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Old .38 special 1911

Discussion in '1911 Forums' started by Boeydafunk, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. Boeydafunk

    Boeydafunk

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    Jan 3, 2008
    A friend of mine just showed me a very old 1911 style gun (probably 40-50 yrs old) It was originally chambered in .38 super but was converted to fire .38sp. wad cutters. The conversion was done by a custom gun shop out of florida. It has been in this configuration for a long time, I believe much before the Coonan and other guns became popular. The gentleman who owned it is now deceased, but it is an early colt pistol with a rib on the top of the slide. Trigger pull in the onces. Ill try and get some pics but am curios if anyone had heard or knows anything about such a weapon. Approx value at ninety percent? Any info appreciated
    DaFunk
     
  2. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson

    4,301
    46
    Jul 10, 2001
    Alabama
    Probably a Giles.
    John Giles of Odessa Fla. was a first class bullseye gunsmith.

    NRA rules call for a .22, a centerfire, and a .45 to complete the 2700 point National Match course. Once it was usual to shoot a .22 auto, a .38 revolver, and a .45 auto. Then the gunsmiths figured out how to convert a .38 Super to .38 Special wadcutter so you could shoot autos in all events.
    Then people realized that a .45 was a centerfire and they could shoot the match with two guns at lower cost and one less gun to load for and get familiar with.
    Since then .38 autos like this conversion, the Gold Cup .38, and the S&W M52 have declined in popularity.

    Still a fine accurate gun and a wonderful example of gunsmithing.
    I won't guess a dollar value.
     


  3. bac1023

    bac1023

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    Sep 26, 2004
    PA
    Yep, sounds like a Giles, RIP.

    There's one for sale at my local shop, actually.
     
  4. Boeydafunk

    Boeydafunk

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    Jan 3, 2008
    How much is the asking price?
    That is exactly what it is. Any guess on possible year of manufacturer
    DaFUnk
     
  5. Boeydafunk

    Boeydafunk

    133
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    Jan 3, 2008
    No one will venture a guess on price and date of manufacture?
    DaFUnk
     
  6. bac1023

    bac1023

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    I can check into the one at my local shop.

    I actually think there are two Giles guns there, to be honest.
     
  7. Rinspeed

    Rinspeed JAFO

    9,942
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    Feb 28, 2001
    NY


    A couple pictures would be nice. :whistling:
     
  8. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson

    4,301
    46
    Jul 10, 2001
    Alabama
    If you furnish the serial number, we can look up the year of manufacture for the original gun. That will not tell anything positive about when it was converted to .38 Special but it would be reasonable to assume that it was bought for the purpose. I don't know many people who say "Oh, I have had this .38 Super laying around for ten years, I think I will have it changed to .38 Special."
     
  9. bladeandbarrel

    bladeandbarrel

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    Apr 7, 2010
    If they are reasonably priced, can you email where they are located?
    Giles was one of the best bullseye smiths that ever lived.
     
  10. bac1023

    bac1023

    102,336
    2,706
    Sep 26, 2004
    PA
    PM sent