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Noob Question - 9mm size?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by sauce33, Nov 4, 2011.

  1. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008
    I was reading through the Lyman manual and it shows the overall size (length) of the bullet. I measured some factory 115gr ammo just to test the digital caliper I was using and I noticed the length was shorter than what Lyman recommended (1.169). I also read that you need to be careful not to set the bullet to deep or lower than the recommended length or else the pressures will be to high. The caliper is calibrated correctly. What am I missing?

    Thank you,

    sauce
     
  2. XDRoX

    XDRoX

    6,325
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    Jan 24, 2009
    San Diego
    Longer round means lower pressure. If you're a newb, then lower pressures are a good thing. Best advice is just to load as long as possible that will function in your gun. I load my 9mm round nose to 1.140". This functions just fine in all 8 of my 9mm's.
     


  3. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008

    I think that is what the factory round measured. So that your overall length of 1.140 is shorter than the recommended 1.169 in the Lyman book. Your round has more pressure correct?

    I quote... "With any handgun cartridge it is important not to seat bullets to a shorter length than specified in the data" Aren't you breaking this rule or am I missing something?
     
  4. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008

    I'm going to use WIN 231
     
  5. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    There are two measurements in the book. Well, the one you mention and then the one listed for each bullet/load. The 1.169 is the MAX OAL for the cartridge. It is not specific to any load data. Each separate bullet/load section has a OAL listed for that load. It is the length they tested the load at. It is not specific to your barrel or you. If you go shorter you will have more pressure, if you go longer you will have less.
    Determining OAL is specific to your barrel. This thread will help you understand how to find max OAL for your barrel and bullet. You seldom need to load to max length.

    http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1375623
     
  6. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008

    I get it now. Thank you.
     
  7. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

    18,083
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    May 31, 2007
    Old Colorado City
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  8. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    Oct 19, 2011
    There are Standards!

    SAMMI is the industry standard (also an ANSI standard) and it specifies things like maximum and minimum OAL.

    http://www.saami.org/specifications_and_information/publications/download/205.pdf

    You will see on page 21 (page 29 of the .pdf) that the minimum OAL is 1.000" and the maximum is 1.169". So Lyman was just stating the maximum OAL according to the standards.

    Each load that is published will also have an assembled length that should result in acceptable pressures for the various powders and charges. These are the numbers you want to consider so long as they are within the minimum and maximum of the standards.

    Not only does the 9mm cartridge have to fit the chamber and comply with the loading data but it also has to fit the magazine and cycle through the gun.

    Most sources publish a minimum and maximum charge for a given bullet and a particular powder. It is wise to start at the minimum and work up. The Lyman manual should tell you how to detect overpressure (things like difficult extraction, flattened primers, etc) and you should check for these things as you increase the load.

    Richard
     
  9. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008
    Richard,

    Thanks for the info. Another question. Lyman does not post specs for 115gr FMJ round nose (Using Delta Precision). It does post 115gr TMJ specs. Can I use the lowest powder charge on the TMJ spec?
     
  10. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

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    Aug 4, 2008
    FL
    Sauce, yes you can use the TMJ data for the PD FMJ. Similar construction/profile/weight allows for relatively interchangable data. Start working up your loads with the suggested starting load, make five or so rounds of each powder charge as you work up looking for pressure signs. Most semiauto pistols will have reliable cycling at a mid level charge.
     
  11. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008

    Thank you
     
  12. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

    2,950
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    Aug 4, 2008
    FL
    I should have mentioned that the TMJ bullet Lyman refers to may have been an electroplated bullet. That said, I have purchased bullets that appeared to have a gas check beneath the copper jacket of a modified FMJ style profile, giving a TMJ profile.

    Lyman separately lists data for full lead bullets. They will have a decreased powder charge as compared to a jacketed bullet. Electroplated bullets are oftentimes identified as CMJ or TMJ, and will use lead reloading data.
     
  13. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Montana Gold's CMJ's are actually FMJ with the disc as you describe.
     
  14. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    Oct 19, 2011
    But Hornady does!

    You didn't expect to just buy one reloading manual, did you? In addition to Lyman's (which I don't use much), I have Sierra Edition V, Speer #14, Speer #9 (some times the old ways are best) and Ken Water's Pet Loads plus whatever data I can get from the powder manufacturers.

    And still it isn't enough...

    Richard
     
  15. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

    2,950
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    Aug 4, 2008
    FL
    C4W, it was probably their bullet that I was thinking of.
     
  16. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008
    I'm pretty overwhelmed with all the Abbreviations and information that does not make sense in regards to bullets types and weights.


    In the Lyman book it says the MAX overall length (OAL) for the 9mm 115gr bullet is 1.090. This does not make any sense to me. I measured a Lawman 115 FMJ and it is over the max in the Lyman book. 1.090 is a very “stubby” looking 9mm bullet LOL. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.


    Also the length for a 115gr FMJ or JHP should have the same overall length correct?


    Thank you,


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2011
  17. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    The Lyman book says the OAL for a 115gr JHP is 1.090. It does not say that is the MAX oal. Just that is what they tested it at.
    JHP and FMJ do not get loaded to the same length.
     
  18. sauce33

    sauce33

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    Oct 28, 2008

    Thanks
     
  19. Fastbear

    Fastbear

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    Dec 21, 2007
    Have new boxes of Remington 115gr.HP that measure 1.100 and a new box of Winchester 115 FMJ that measure 1.163. So somewhere between 1.100 and 1.169 should keep most of our guns happy with the correct loads for the particular bullet you want to use. I load 115 HPs to 1.163, work fine.