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New to reloading, questions?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by sglock45, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. sglock45

    sglock45

    209
    1
    Jun 1, 2011
    bloomsburg pa
    I've been looking at some different presses and I think I like the lee pro1000 is this good press ill be reloading 9mm and .45 acp mostly for target practice. Is this a good press for these cal and what powder should I use both guns are glocks a 17 and a 30 thanks for any info
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  2. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

    10,016
    1
    Apr 14, 2009
    Conifer, CO
    Many factors are involved; budget, number of rounds expected to be shot, space to set up, amount of spare time, mechanical aptitude, etc., etc., etc.

    Read the stickies at the top of the forum, buy a couple books on loading, read them several times and you'll be able to answer most of the questions that fit your circumstances.

    Do a search on this forum and you'll come up with a plethora of threads on the subject.

    Good luck.


    Jack
     


  3. unclebob

    unclebob

    7,373
    349
    Oct 14, 2000
    Mary Esther FL
    For the pro 1000 and Load Master the emphasis is on your mechanical aptitude.
     
  4. sglock45

    sglock45

    209
    1
    Jun 1, 2011
    bloomsburg pa
    Thanks for the reply I've read reloading manuals till my eyes bleed was just wondering if this press will work for what I want to do I've seen my step dad use a single stage press and it looks like a pain in the butox I have lots of room and already have a good solid bench setup already to go

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  5. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    8,033
    268
    Oct 19, 2011

    Before anyone can give you reasonable advice, you need to define how much ammo you plan to shoot per week/month/year.

    Another interesting data point is your budget. Yes, I know that's kind of personal and I know everyone wants to start reloading on a shoestring. The problem is that such a view is shortsighted. But how shortsighted depends entirely on the quantity of ammo to be reloaded. You have seen how slow a single stage press can be. It turns out that most precision rifle ammo is probably loaded on a single stage press. But 50 rounds of precision rifle ammo is a big deal. For pistol, quantities tend to be much larger.

    Figure that you can reload ammo for 1/2 the price of Wally World Federal Champion. With the savings, over some period of time, you pay for the equipment. Whether that payback is 6 months, a year or two years depends, again, on quantity and the equipment cost. What's an acceptable payback period? In other words, how much can you put in up front to get the savings after some payback period?

    Richard
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  6. sglock45

    sglock45

    209
    1
    Jun 1, 2011
    bloomsburg pa
    I'm willing to spend whatever it takes to get quality equipment I don't want to find out that after 50 rounds my press is shot or something else is junk I would like to shoot 10000 rounds a day but it will be more like 300 to 400 every 2 weeks that's a good practice session for me

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  7. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    8,033
    268
    Oct 19, 2011
    So, about 5000 rounds per year, give or take. I don't know the price for the various Wally World rounds but let's just say $15/50 or $300/1000. For 5000 rounds, that would be $1500/year and you could save about $750/year.

    So, why wouldn't you be looking at something like a Dillon RL550B? Caliber changes are fairly simple and it loads at a reasonable rate. Sure, it's going to eat up most of the first year's savings but it will always have a resale value > 80% of first cost and will last for generations. That, and it's guaranteed FOREVER.

    There is the complication in that you want to load 9mm which uses a small pistol primer and .45 ACP that USUALLY uses a large pistol primer. That is why some of us have two RL550Bs - one for small primer and one for large primer. But you can change the primer mechanism with just a little effort. Or. you can hunt around for that Blazer .45 ACP brass that uses a small primer. That stuff is a real PITA when I get it mixed in with my normal brass!

    If you wind up having to change the primer mechanism, you will want to load in LARGE batches.

    There's some good reading here:
    http://www.brianenos.com/pages/dillon.html

    Richard
     
  8. sglock45

    sglock45

    209
    1
    Jun 1, 2011
    bloomsburg pa
    Thanks for all the info I won't be doing as much 45 as 9 I like shooting the 9 more thanks once again

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  9. TX expat

    TX expat

    375
    0
    Dec 26, 2011
    KC MO
    Some will depend on how much time you want to devote to reloading. If your time is limited then you might want to consider a Dillon; you'll crank out volume quite a bit faster than with a single stage press.

    If you have more time than budget, then just about any Lee, RCBS or other major player will do the job fine.

    If you are doing it correctly, your gun won't know the difference between a round made on a single stage press and one made on the best Dillon. Your end result should be the same either way. The difference is going to be the time it takes to make the rounds and the equipment cost to get you started.

    If you have any desire to do any rifle rounds, you might want to consider starting with a single stage press first, since you'll always be able to use it for quick test batches along with rifle rounds too.
     
  10. unclebob

    unclebob

    7,373
    349
    Oct 14, 2000
    Mary Esther FL
    So if he shoots 400 rds. every two weeks? So using normal math I think. At my age I could be wrong. There are 52 weeks a year divided by 2 = 26. So 26 X 400= 10,400.
     
  11. dkf

    dkf

    5,434
    125
    Aug 6, 2010
    Your old math is inline with my new math.
     
  12. AZson

    AZson

    3,530
    179
    Oct 5, 2005
    Tucson
    You can not go wrong with Tightgroup powder, usually you use less of it then other powders. There by saving money. Which is the biggest reason I reload.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  13. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

    8,033
    268
    Oct 19, 2011
    oops!

    That increases the savings enough to easily cover the RL550B.

    Richard
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  14. AZson

    AZson

    3,530
    179
    Oct 5, 2005
    Tucson
    Also find a good lead bullet maker, I like Bear Creek Bullets or Billy Bullets, they leave no lead in my Glock stock barrels.
     
  15. Black&TAN

    Black&TAN Senior Member

    442
    3
    Jun 13, 2011
    Cleveland, OH
    Just bought an RL550B, and absolutely love it! Good advice for the beginner, or vetran reloader in the market for a new press.

    sent via Tapatalk
     
  16. TN.Frank

    TN.Frank Glock4Life

    5,686
    186
    Oct 11, 2004
    Avondale, AZ.
    Dillon makes excellent equipment. If you can afford one(and I've looked lately and the Square Deal B isn't really all that expensive, really.) then I'd say go with a SDB or 550B and call it a day. You'll have plenty of press to load up handgun rounds quickly for the rest of your days here on Earth. They really do make that good of a press and IIRC they've got a lifetime warranty too but don't quote me on that.
    If I get lucky enough to shoot my PX4 more I just might break down and buy a Dillon my dang self since it gets kind of old pulling the handle on a RCBS Partner press when you've got 400 or 500 rounds to load. :supergrin:
     
  17. sglock45

    sglock45

    209
    1
    Jun 1, 2011
    bloomsburg pa
    getting some good info here i and my friend have been talking about reloading for a long time now this just makes it easy to decide on which equipment to get thanks alot guys :wavey:
     
  18. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

    2,950
    1
    Aug 4, 2008
    FL
    It's not always about whether one shoots a high quantity of rounds or not. Sometimes, its a simple matter of how much or little time one wants to spend in front of a press to produce their own quality product, regardless of the number rounds made.
     
  19. WiskyT

    WiskyT Malcontent

    11,682
    1
    Jun 12, 2002
    North Carolina
    The Pro1000 will do fine in terms of production speed for what you want. It is cheap to buy. In many ways it is a very simple press. BUT, and it's a big but, it can be a frustrating press to use. The instructions aren't much help when it gives you trouble.

    If you are an un-indicted CEO of an investment banking firm, get a Dillon. If money is tight, the Lee will work, just be prepared to deal with some of it's issues.