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New Purchase Advice

Discussion in 'Tactical Shotguns' started by E-Money, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. E-Money

    E-Money

    732
    0
    May 1, 2008
    I’ve been reading this forum for a short bit and have most of the basics covered, but…
    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p> </o:p>
    I’m looking at buying a shotgun mainly for fun but potentially for HD also. I found a couple used police 870’s at Bud’s but need some help.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    One is a 20”, 7+1, standard synth stock for $299 and the other is an 18”, 6+1, speed feed synth stock for $329.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Is the speed feed stock worth the extra $30? How many rounds do they hold? I’ve never seen one before.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    I was also kind of interested in an 18”, 7+1, Mossy 930 SX they had for $583 but didn’t necessarily want to spend that much (but I could swing it).
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Is it possible to effectively use a 20” or 18” for sporting clays? Can you add chokes to either the 870 or 930? Or would they even make a difference on a short barrel?
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. The answer to how many rounds they hold is in your post. When a Shotgun is advertised as 7+1 it holds 7 rounds in the magazine and one in the chamber for a total of 8 rounds. If you are asking about the Speed Feed stock they have some models that hold extra shells, I belive 2 per side for 4 rounds in the stock. But not all Speed Feed stocks have that.

    For home defense I'd prefer the 18" barrel.

    A 20" or 18" cylinder choked barrel with a fixed choke would not be effective for sporting clays. It wouldn't be too bad for skeet. Some shorter barrels come with choke tubes or you can have the barrel cut for choke tubes. I have an 18.5" barrel on a Mossberg 500 that takes choke tubes. It's fun to put in the full choke tube and hit the trap range.

    [​IMG]

    But a better option would be to get a 28" vent rib barrel that accepts choke tubes. Should be able to buy one for about $150-$175.
     

    Last edited: Sep 21, 2010

  3. method

    method

    4,189
    262
    Mar 27, 2002
    Cleveland, OH
    I can't comment much on the Speedfeed stock. There's plenty of discussion about them online, so I'd just do some reading and decide if it seems worth it to you or not.

    You can shoot sporting clays with a short barrel, just won't be as easy, as the gun won't swing as well as it would with a longer barrel. You can always pick up a spare 26" or 28" barrel if you really get into shooting clays.

    Most barrels can be threaded for choke tubes, just a matter of sufficient wall thickness. Remington offers a 20" rifle sighted barrel with choke tubes, or at least used to. Barrel length alone doesn't have much of an impact on patterning.

    eta: I didn't really consider the ranges involved in sporting clays....you probably would need a tighter choke to reach out a bit.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2010
  4. E-Money

    E-Money

    732
    0
    May 1, 2008
    Thanks guys! VA - yes, I was asking about how many shells the speed feed stock held.

    I think I may pursue a 930 package that includes an 18.5" and 28" barrel and maybe get a mag extension for some fun in the sun.
     
  5. sambeaux2249

    sambeaux2249

    159
    0
    Dec 4, 2006
    Louisiana
    My speedfeed stock holds 4 shells... two on each side.

    Sam
     
  6. mixflip

    mixflip

    6,825
    3
    Mar 4, 2009
    I never get tired of seeing that pic. I guess I'd call that a K.I.S.S. pump shotgun. Old school wood on an 18" Mossberg, now thats tactical!

     
  7.  
  8. MajorD

    MajorD

    2,400
    115
    Aug 16, 2010
    I myself have had much better luck with remington as opposed to mossberg (my military unit in Iraq then Afghanistan was carrying mossbergs without any problems I know of however.) Getting the remington then getting spare barrels for use as a bird gun is the way to go. Another consideration is to buy something like the 870 express combo that usually has both a bird barrel with screw in chokes and a slug barrel of a length suitable for HD.These are often available from mass merchandiser's like cabela's for under 400 bucks. You can then add a side saddle for spare ammo-would need the 4 shot version or to remove or mod the handguards on an 870 express for the 6 shot to fit. Also note that the express version of the 870 has some "dimples" in the mag tube that need to be removed if you intend to add a mag extension. Remington also makes the 870 express home defense