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Need help identifying some old guns.

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by Engine30, Jun 30, 2012.


  1. Engine30

    Engine30
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    Hi guys, I've got some old guns that I need you all to look at and tell me what they are. They're actually a buddy of mines and I told him if anyone knew they'd be in this forum. Anyways, here's the first one, it's a Colt but I don't know what model. There's more, and I'll of post pics them, but I'll get started here.

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    #1 Engine30, Jun 30, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2012
  2. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson
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    You show a Browning .22 Automatic Rifle. I don't know that it ever had any other model name or number, it was the only one they made for many, many years. Looks like a Leupold scope, which makes it a very nice little outfit.

    I think the revolver is a Colt Police Positive Target model, but it might be the even older New Police Target. Caliber .22LR would be nice for shooting, .32 NP (=.32 S&W Long) probably the least common, .22 WRF pretty common and ammo takes a bit of searching.

    Close up pictures of the markings on uncommon guns will be a big help identifying them.
     

  3. Engine30

    Engine30
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    Thanks for the quick info! I've got a few more guns to post when I get back to the station.

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  4. WiskyT

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    Putting a scope on that Browning is like putting 26" rims on a 3.8 litre XKE convertible.
     
  5. failsafe

    failsafe
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    Yep the rifle is a Browning 22 cal takedown..It looks like a grade 1...Here is a pic of my grade II..
    Note the difference in the stock finish, gold trigger and etching on the reciever..
    On the old ones the date of mfgr was the first 2 digits of the serial #...It changed once they were no longer made in Belgium... Mine is a 1970..Belgium made Browning..
    [​IMG]
     
  6. WiskyT

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    Nice! Is that some kind of satin nickel on the receiver, or is it just the picture?
     
  7. failsafe

    failsafe
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    Yes the grade II and III's did not have the blued reciever..I would call it a satin finish, with etchings of small animals on the sides..
     
  8. WiskyT

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    Thanks. I've only seen the blued grade I versions. When you're eight years old, you learn not to let your weak side forearm drop under the action while firing, at least not with short sleeves on.
     
  9. failsafe

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    I found the info I was looking for as far as dating your 22..It's all in the serial number...
    22 Semi-Auto Rifle..
    My serial # begins with a 70T..Look below to date yours..


    The production of the 22 Semi-Auto rifle began in 1914, and was officially imported by Browning in 1956. It is still in production today.



    1914-1955

    F.N. began production of the 22 Semi-Auto Rifle.

    No serial numbers are available.



    1956-1967

    In 1961, the codes for calibers were changed:
    T=Long Rifle Caliber
    E=Short Rifle Caliber
    Example: 8T1000 = A 1968 22 Long Rifle Caliber Semi-Auto Rifle with serial number 1000.

    T=Long Rifle Caliber
    E=Short Rifle Caliber



    1969-73

    1969 started using two digits for the date of manufacture:
    T=Long Rifle Caliber
    E=Short Rifle Caliber
    This was then followed by the serial number beginning with 1000.
    Example: 69T1000 = A 1969 22 Semi-Auto rifle in 22 Long Rifle Caliber with a serial number of 1000.

    T=Long Rifle Caliber
    E=Short Rifle Caliber



    1974

    In 1974, production of the 22 Semi-Auto was moved to Miroku, Japan. The order of the serial number code was changed to:
    1.Serial Number which started at 1000 for each year.
    2. Two digit year code
    3. Rifle type code:
    T=Long Rifle Caliber
    E=Short Rifle Caliber

    Example: 1000T74 = A 1974 22 Semi-Auto rifle in 22 Long Rifle Caliber with a serial number of 1000.

    T=Long Rifle Caliber



    1976-1997

    In 1976, Browning standardized its serial number identification.



    1. Serial Number
    beginning with 01001
    at the start of each year.




    2. Date of Manufacture
    is a two-digit code

    Z=1
    Y=2
    X=3
    W=4
    V=5
    T=6
    R=7
    P=8
    N=9
    M=0



    3. 22 Semi-Auto Type

    146=Grade 1
    246=Grade 2
    346=Grade 3
    646=Grade 6





    Serial
    Number Example:
    01001RT646

    This would be a 22 Semi-Auto Grade 6 rifle, manufactured in 1976 with the serial number 1000.



    1999

    In 1998, Browning revised the standardization of its serial number system to work with a new data base.



    1. Serial Number
    beginning with 01001
    at the start of each year.




    2. Date of Manufacture
    is a two-digit code

    Z=1
    Y=2
    X=3
    W=4
    V=5
    T=6
    R=7
    P=8
    N=9
    M=0



    3. 22 Semi-Auto Type

    212=22 Semi-Auto Rifle





    Serial
    Number Example:
    01001NN212
    This would be a 22 Semi-Auto Rifle, manufactured in 1999 with the serial number 01001.
     
    #9 failsafe, Jun 30, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2012
  10. MrMurphy

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    That Browning has a magazine tube in the stock.

    Really, REALLY check it's clear several times. Had an idiot nearly put a round into the ceiling of a gunshop once. Thankfully I stopped him in time, and in his defense he did not know the magazine tube was there, and he HAD checked the chamber (once).
     
  11. failsafe

    failsafe
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    Good point...Yes the butt fed magazine tube should be removed, then the weapon cycled a few times..On some of the older rifles stored for a time, there may be an expanded cartridge or such...Point in a safe direction and clear the rifle, if you do not know the procedure, ask for assistance..
     
  12. WiskyT

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    I keep a lightly oiled cleaning patch sticking half out of the bolt to act as a chamber "flag" since there's no bolt hold open.
     
  13. Engine30

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    Thanks for the replies fellas, you've given me some great information to pass on to my friend. I'm uploading the shotgun photos and other revolvers. I'll have them on in a few. The connection at our station is frickin SLOW!!!!
     
  14. WiskyT

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    Also, some (most) leather holsters are really bad to store a gun in. Most old revolvers were put up by grandpa in a holster and 20 years later someone digs it out and finds a gun rusted into the holster. There is acid or something that is used to tan the leather that is bad news for long term storage. Advise your buddy not to store that nice Colt in a holster.
     
  15. Engine30

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    Thanks, I had no idea about that.

    I'm fairly new to guns, and my friend knows that guns go bang.

    Here's the pics of the others.

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Engine30

    Engine30
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    I don't think his is a II, It looks like a I. What would be the average price for one in as good condition as yours? It looks pretty nice!

    I'm thinking that he's going to want to sell all but the shotgun and I'm thinking about buying the rifle from him.
     
  17. WiskyT

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    First thing I'd do is make sure the scope mounting didn't bugger up the gun. See if he'll let you remove it so you can check out what's under it. There is a folding leaf rear sight that may have been removed as well.
     
  18. Engine30

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    He'll have it in his possession pretty soon, and I'll get a chance to take a close look at it. If the sight has been removed, I'm assuming that a replacement wouldn't be too hard to find?

    Also, does mounting a sight like that do possible damage to the finish of the gun?

    Thanks
     
  19. WiskyT

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    The sight might be there. It folds down and would be hard to see in the pic. Parts are still available from Browning as they still make the gun. I got a couple of small parts recently from them. Commonly missing from them is the shell stop as it falls free when the bolt is removed. I was missing that and one of the scope base screws that are used as blanks to fill the factory drilled and tapped holes.

    If the scope was mounted properly, it should be okay. It really takes away from the gun though. The gun is like toothpick. It's really graceful and svelte. You'll appreciate it when you pick it up in your hands. Also, I don't know if you can take the gun down with the scope on there like that. The scope is mounted to the barrel and the barrel has to rotate 90* to be removed. The scope base might hit the top of the receiver if the barrel is rotated.
     
  20. Engine30

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    I'm thinking that the shotgun is a winchester model 21. If I'm incorrect please let me know. I've been looking for shotguns that are similar to the pic, and that's the one that seems most like the posted here.

    Thanks