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Neckshooting deer

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by ithaca_deerslayer, Mar 25, 2009.

  1. In a different thread of a different topic, somebody pointed out the neck as the best place to shoot deer. He uses a .22-250 with 45gr hollow points. (If he sees this thread, he can comment on it himself). He says they always drop, and no meat is lost.

    My question is, what do the rest of you think of neckshooting a deer? Are there any negatives?

    I only have experience with broadside heart/lung shots. But maybe I should try neckshooting and see how it goes. My concern would be having the bullet miss the spine and vitals in the neck, and just going through wounding the deer.

    With the heart/lung area, I was taught that was the biggest vital area and best target of opportunity.

    And, I assume, nobody uses neckshooting with arrows, but maybe somebody does and has great success with that?

    Thanks :)
     
  2. I found this summary of suggested reasons not to. I don't know, so I'm just trying to get a discussion going.


    http://www.huntingblades.com/neshareou.html
    Neck Shots are OUT!

    Contrary to what the name implies, still hunting is the act of walking through the woods, slowly looking for game. It is slow, effective, and very hard to learn to do correctly. Once mastered, still hunting can be one of the most productive hunting methods is the whitetail woods.

    I know of a lot of hunters who swear by the neck shot on deer, in my opinion the neck shot is unethical and honestly wastes to much good sausage meat.

    The reasons for this decision are as follows:

    1. The neck of a deer is a relatively small area compared to the much more humane and ethical lung/heart shot. The only 2 guaranteed areas in the neck that will consistently offer one shot stops are the jugular and the spine each of which are relatively small areas to be shooting at.

    2. Even if you are an excellent shot any movement from the animal can cause you to miss the neck all together or worse hitting the animal in a non vital area, resulting in a wounded animal, that will suffer needlessly. Compare the neck movement of a feeding deer to that of the heart and lung shot, the deer is constantly moving its neck, while the chest area remains relatively motionless.

    3. The neck shot needlessly ruins more meat that the behind the shoulder shot. I realize that not all hunters do so for the meat, but why waste more than you have to?

    As far as I am concerned, neck shots should never be taken, unless the animal is already wounded and it is the only follow up shot that presents itself, the chances of wounding the animal are far too great for the shot to be called ethical.
     


  3. Hauptmann6

    Hauptmann6

    4,216
    94
    May 22, 2002
    Portage, MI
    I've shot most of the deer I have taken in the neck. Never had one move other than to fall over. Now that being said. It's a very situational shot. If the animal is moving don't shoot it there. Stopped and eating or looking? Definitely.

    No offense to your friend but a 22-250 isn't great choice for deer. I know a couple guys that use them and they both lose more dear than anyone else I know. They hit them and track them forever but never find them.
     
  4. Tailhunter

    Tailhunter Glockman

    4,872
    0
    Dec 25, 2007
    NC/VA State Line
    Well ... all I can do is comment on what i know to be fact ... with well over 200 confirmed kills. A .22-250 in the out stretched neck of a feeding deer is deadly. There is no tracking, no trailing and no loss. To each their own but when I am grocery shopping, I love my .22-250.

    ithaca .... the article you referenced was written by a bone head. There are hunters and there are killers. Hunters read books and buy equipment in hopes of some day shooting a deer. Killers eat some form of venison everyday. I eat therefore I kill. :supergrin:
     
  5. Is very common on my neck of the woods. Many people prefer shooting the neck broadside. Me I prefer neck shots when deer is looking straight at me or walking away from me (I'm better at guessing windage than drop). The advantage other than being able to use smaller calibers, is the fact that you do not waste any meat or blood (moronga) and you still be able to mount it. As a bonus, your kill is more humane since a shot in the neck, shorts circuits the nerve system and the deer don't suffer a bit and dies more relaxed (softer meat).:supergrin:
     
  6. Every deer I've seen shot in the neck has dropped on the spot. A lot people does this in the glades on standing water to avoid going thru a lot of water to get the game ;) But it's not a perfer'd shot no do you see any hunting books that shows this as being the perfer'd kill zone on a deer or any animal.

    Now a broadside shot into the vitals offers the biggest area ( target size ) an even if you off, you still get a kill ( too high you hit the spine, to low you nip the heart base on right smack middle aimpoint ) With a neck or even a head shot, your room of error is way much smaller.


    I guess if one goes out with a smaller inferior caliber, he/she should aim for the neck due to their bad choice of ammo. All of my deers shot with a a known majority deer caliber in a rifle, have fallenl within 10-20yards of being hit, and once again if you stay off the shoulder you don't damage any eating meats.
     
  7. chevy01234

    chevy01234

    657
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    Jul 19, 2004
    mississippi
    I shoot all my deer in the neck! I haven't ever lost one and never had to "track" one either.
     
  8. ajstrider

    ajstrider Silent Warrior

    556
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    Apr 17, 2005
    Western Kentucky
    I haven't ever shot a deer in the neck and don't plan to. People will tell you that they drop instantly, well of course, you are aiming for their spine. If you miss though, you might hit them in the throat, which would be a long painful death I would think, or they choke on their blood if you are lucky. People like to do it because they can use light calibers of the 22 caliber variety. I prefer a good lung and heart shot. But everyone is entitled to hunt their way, and I will defend them against anti hunters!
     
  9. Tha is why I shot infront of the neck or behind the neck to avoid just ripping its troat. either way I hit, it will brake the spine and cut the nerve system. Even if I'm off an inch or two, the kinetic energy will shred the spine discs on the neck.
     
  10. msoprano

    msoprano

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    Jun 2, 2005
  11. smitty81

    smitty81 NRA MEMBER

    1,331
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    Jul 19, 2008
    Midwest
    I know from expierence that a tough deer will keep going if you shoot the neck and just hit muscle. From the orgional post. Loosing no meat from a hollow point? Thats unheard of, read what a hollow points function is. The neck has a ton of muscle. Why shoot the neck if you can shoot the lung or heart, they will defantly die.
     
  12. Tailhunter

    Tailhunter Glockman

    4,872
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    Dec 25, 2007
    NC/VA State Line
    again with the stuff that just isn't so .......
     
  13. domindart

    domindart glocker

    278
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    Jan 13, 2007
    Smyrna ga
    so.. can you use a .22 cal rifle, say a marlin papoose on a deer successfully? assuming you are aiming for the heart/lungs?

    would a scope be smart?

    the very very last thing I want to do is hurt an animal and have it suffering its life away.

    I have a brother that hunts, so I will ask him more questions on the matter and maybe go with him on a hunt if possible.
     
  14. You are talking about .22 long rifle. Most would say NO. Too much chance to wound.

    If you are talking about .223 or .22-250, with the right bullets, then many would say YES. But not all would say yes, and it would be a hotly debated subject.

    All are .22, but a big difference in velocity.
     
  15. chevy01234

    chevy01234

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    Jul 19, 2004
    mississippi
    I would not go out deer hunting with a .22 lr but I have killed deer on my farm with both a .22lr and .17hmr. It can be done, although it is not recommended by the masses.

    If in a crazy stuck in the wilderness with nothing but my .22, hell yea I will kill a deer with it but I would rather have my .280 or 300 mag!


    Just because something CAN be done doesn't mean it SHOULD be done! Personally, I have no qualms shooting a deer with my .223 either. It's all about shot placement and knowing your personal limitations! This could be argued to death either way!
     
  16. domindart

    domindart glocker

    278
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    Jan 13, 2007
    Smyrna ga
    okay. if I should happen upon a deer and I need to kill it, what should I do, with a .22lr? how did you do it, chevy?
     
  17. smitty81

    smitty81 NRA MEMBER

    1,331
    0
    Jul 19, 2008
    Midwest
    Were kinda getting off subject..............:whistling:
     
  18. havensal

    havensal Nozzle Jockey CLM

    2,939
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    Aug 14, 2003
    Western, NY
    Back when I had to use a slug gun or hand gun I would only take broadside shots. I knew that I was not 100% accurate and didn't want to take a chance wounding one.

    Now that I can use rifle I will take a head or neck shot. I know where it hits, every time.

    As long as you have a clear shot, take it. :wavey:

    I took a buck in the back of the neck with me 25-06 and a doe in the head with me .270 this year. Neither were going to give me a better shot. Both dropped.

    My muzzle loader isn't as accurate, so I haven't taken anything but a side shot yet. I am not sure I would try a neck shot or not. :dunno: