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My new habit with carry ammo

Discussion in 'Carry Issues' started by Henry's Dad, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. Henry's Dad

    Henry's Dad woof, woof

    Maybe I'm the last guy to do this, but I recently saw the wisdom of it:

    (1) Remove barrel from gun

    (2) Drop each round of your EDC ammo in the breech end to make sure it seats properly and doesn't get hung up from a case being bulged.

    I began doing this when I had a feeding issue with some brand-name factory personal defense ammo.

    Just by random chance, the top round of the one mag I had inserted wouldn't feed correctly. I thought it was a generic feeding issue (bullet getting hung up on barrel ramp, etc.), but when I disassembled the gun and tried to seat THAT particular round in the barrel, it wouldn't seat due to case bulging.

    If that round been further down in the mag, I could have had a major hang-up at an inopportune time.

    So, now I'm in the habit of testing every round of carry ammo in the disassembled barrel before it goes into a mag.

    I'm surprised that I've never heard of anyone doing this basic safety/reliability check, and no one has ever recommended it to me in my 15 years of handgun shooting.

    Like I said, maybe I'm the last guy to do this, but I thought I'd recommend it if it's not part of your regular routine with a new box of your EDC ammo.

    It takes a few extra minutes, but well worth the peace of mind, IMO.
     
  2. Good idea, a case gauge will do the same thing.

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  3. jpa

    jpa CLM

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    Las Vegas NV
    Not everyone has a case gauge, but everyone who has a gun (hopefully) has a barrel! :)
     
  4. Seems like a fine idea.

    At the very least, look over the ammo. Occassional I see target rounds that won't chamber if the brass is goofed up.
     
  5. lawson12

    lawson12

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    May 26, 2012
    Sounds a little OCD to me honestly. To each his own.
     
  6. Pretty much. I've seen match and target shooters barrel drop their match ammo in their match barrels to make sure they won't have a hang-up. I understand your concern, and agree that manufacturing blips like that shouldn't happen with defensive ammo, but we all know that's impossible. I give mine a look-over and roll em between my fingers as I load em. Good enough for me.
     
  7. larry_minn

    larry_minn Silver Member Millennium Member

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    Dec 16, 1999
    Minnesota
    Not a bad idea to use a case guage. I must admit I just visually look at them.
    If you take one that does fail a case guage and run it in practice. Most will chamber, fire, eject just fine. There is enough force to smooth out minor imperfections.

    So IMO ideally a person should use guage, barrel, type check. Unless I find bad ammo I personally am not going to bother.
     
  8. DrewF86

    DrewF86

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    Jun 12, 2012
    Central FLorida
    I personally wouldn't do that, but it certainly is a sure fire way to make sure your ammo feeds well. When I shoot last months carry rounds, I'll load up my new magazine, and then hand cycle the slide to make sure they all feed.
     
  9. From my experience hand cycling doesn't exactly replicate what's going on in your gun. That first round drop, sure, but after that, everything is happening at a much faster rate than your doing by hand. I've had guns that cycled beautifully at home under my hand, get to the range, and it's a turd every round.

    I wouldn't bother to hand cycle my fresh ammo, in case I slip on grabbing it, short stroke, nose dive my ammo into my feed ramp, and set the bullet further back into the case, causing higher chamber pressures, and the round may not feed correctly after.

    I just look mine over to make sure a primer is in and the case is straight.
     
  10. larry_minn

    larry_minn Silver Member Millennium Member

    9,165
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    Dec 16, 1999
    Minnesota
    I guess the best way is to shoot your carry ammo. That way you know it did function. :0 :0
     
  11. quichedem

    quichedem

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    Nov 12, 2004
    N.O. LA
    Is the quality of premium defensive ammo declining these days?
     
  12. collim1

    collim1 Shower Time!

    7,369
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    Mar 14, 2005
    USA
    The quality of everything is declining these days.

    I visually inspect my carry rounds, but have never dropped them in the barrel. I'm not gonna say it OCD.
     
  13. Stevekozak

    Stevekozak Returning video

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    I have never thought about it, but it sounds like a good idea. Sure as hell can't hurt anything.
     
  14. I would disagree. By all accounts I've read, (most) modern defensive ammo is the most effective and technologically advanced round in history.
     
  15. THEPOPE

    THEPOPE Nibb

    4,183
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    Feb 2, 2006
    Fort Wayne, Indiana
    Get a Glock or Springfield XD series...never had an issue with either, after tens of thousands of rounds...feeds all, eats all......

    I am out .......:cool:
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2012
  16. I've had my Glocks not feed bad brass. They got in the mag because I didn't look at them:)

    The chamber check of the OP would have caught that, because the crimpled up brass didn't fit in the chamber :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2012
  17. mace85

    mace85 NRA GOA USPSA

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    Arizona
    I have been doing that for a while. I always recommend people do it with their ammo when talking with friends. Learned that trick a few years back from an instructor at a carbine course. It seemed like a quick and easy way to minimize the chances of things going wrong.