close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Welcome to Glock Talk

Why should YOU join our Glock forum?

  • Converse with other Glock Enthusiasts
  • Learn about the latest hunting products
  • Becoming a member is FREE and EASY

If you consider yourself a beginner or an avid shooter, the Glock Talk community is your place to discuss self defense, concealed carry, reloading, target shooting, and all things Glock.

My first bike!

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by thisaway, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. thisaway

    thisaway Moderator

    1,580
    3
    Jan 11, 2000
    Soddy Daisy, Tenn.
    I bought an '84 Honda VT500 Ascot recently. It is my first motorcycle. I found it at a friend's cycle shop for $1000, and decided to get it, even if I might have been paying more than it's "book value". It has a tad less than 16000 miles on it. I have only been riding it around my hometown, but am enjoying it so far.

    Wish me luck! ;Y
     
  2. BrianM_G21

    BrianM_G21

    57
    0
    Aug 18, 2004
    Manchester, GA
    That's a great bike... actually, you have the bottom end of the Honda Hawk (and thus can easily upgrade should that be something you're interested in down the line).

    Hope you've taken a class like the MSF (www.msf-usa.org) and you're wearing gear. Most new riders crash at least a couple times in their first season... be it tip-overs in parking lots or full on 55mph crashes on the highway. It pays to be prepared.. (certainly cheaper than the alternative medical bills).

    Enjoy!
     


  3. chevrofreak

    chevrofreak Senior Member

    2,696
    0
    Dec 27, 2001
    Billings, Montana
    One of the best looking 80's bikes as far as I'm concerned.
     
  4. quinch

    quinch Turgid Member Millennium Member

    176
    0
    Aug 9, 1999
    Omnipresent
    Cool! Nice bike. My first road bike was a CX500.
    I hadn't seen the VT500 before, I had to google it.
     
  5. Eyespy

    Eyespy Proud Infidel

    120
    0
    Sep 2, 2004
    Southern California
    That's an excellent choice for a first bike. Now I would stress obtaining as much formal rider training as you can get, and proper gear.
     
  6. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

    6,193
    4
    Apr 28, 2002
    Above ground
    I think you chose wisely. You can ride that bike, improve your skills and if you decide to move up down the road you won't get hurt financially. Sure makes a heck of lot more sense than the folks I see who's first bike is a full size hog or repli-racer.

    Check this out:

    clic pic

    [​IMG]
     
  7. RKC2000

    RKC2000 OFOPOS

    125
    0
    Jun 2, 2003
    Florida
    Great way to start - congrats and have fun. My first bike was a Honda C110 -50cc back in 1966 when I was 14.
     
  8. Eyespy

    Eyespy Proud Infidel

    120
    0
    Sep 2, 2004
    Southern California
    Don't you wish you still had it in the garage! :)
     
  9. BNSF

    BNSF 228th suxs big

    61
    0
    May 30, 2004
    At the foot of NORAD
  10. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

    6,193
    4
    Apr 28, 2002
    Above ground
    That's your first motorcycle of any kind? How long have you had it?
     
  11. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

    6,193
    4
    Apr 28, 2002
    Above ground
    Just curious how much riding experience you have. Depending on how you look at it racer replicas can be very safe bikes. They accelerate fast and stop fast too. I typically use acceleration to stay out of bad spots on a motorcycle more than I use the brakes.

    What makes them not as safe, for a new rider, are also the accelertion and good brakes. The acceleration of a bike like the R1 can overwhelm the space, speed, time senses of rookie riders. One of the more common crashes I've seen is a rider braking too late and going straight off a corner. Many times the speed could have been carried through the corner with the right technique, but many times too the rear brake gets locked up in a panic situation causing the inexperienced to lose control.

    An R1 requires more finesse with the throttle and front brake too. Many drivers have no concept of throttle control because their vehicles don't have enough power to get out of shape even when the throttle is slammed wide open. This obviously isn't the case with high performance bikes or cars for that matter.

    The front brakes on an R1 are terrific, however any bike requires that during a braking event the weight is transfered to the front wheel before the full force of the brakes can be utilized. Immediately grabing a handful of front brakes can put someone on the ground faster than they can say WTF.

    Another challenging characteristic of a superbike is their stubby clip on handlebars and steeply angled front forks. This makes them less manueverable in city traffic. Something like an enduro with wide handle bars and forks that have a more relaxed angle are much easier and better at swerving and evasive manuevers.

    This isn't to say that you can't safely learn to ride on your R1 just that there are different issues to contend with on such a high performance machine. Personally I have over 200,000 miles on motorcycles and I have many friends with more miles under their belts. We all have one thing in common, we always wear protective gear. I hope that you do the same and that you have many safe years of riding ahead of you. If you haven't taken an MSF course I recommend that highly, click on the MSF logo above for more information.

    Whew, that was a much longer response than I had planned. :)
     
  12. BNSF

    BNSF 228th suxs big

    61
    0
    May 30, 2004
    At the foot of NORAD
    Thanks for the kind reply. I know the R1 is a lot of bike. I will keep it forever. I am mature and old enough. I think safety all the time. I am not like some of those nuts or young punks that because it is an R1, they they think I want to race. I do not race. I ride like if I was riding on a sports car. I like to have fun in a safe manner.
     
  13. Eyespy

    Eyespy Proud Infidel

    120
    0
    Sep 2, 2004
    Southern California
    Unfortunately, the MSF is not what it once was, and a lot of people in the industry have noticed this and are not happy about it....
     
  14. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

    6,193
    4
    Apr 28, 2002
    Above ground
    Well I've got to admit it has been many years since I took the experienced rider course. I took it after I had been riding for 20 years and still felt it was worthwhile.

    Only two things stuck out as techniques I personally disagreed with. The first was when your rear wheel locks up to stay on the rear brake and ride out the skid. I could see where they were coming from, but I wasn't about to adopt that practice. The other was less objectionable, they wanted us to always use all four fingers for braking. I got reprimanded several times for not doing this because I had been two finger braking for so many years it was an ingrained habit.

    What is it about the MSF that isn't as good? Is there another street/traffic oriented riding school that you recommend in place of the MSF?
     
  15. Eyespy

    Eyespy Proud Infidel

    120
    0
    Sep 2, 2004
    Southern California
    Short cut, it is too convoluted a problem to easily boil down to a few words here, but I would refer you to an excellent 2-Part essay on the subject written by David L. Hough entitled "Trouble in Rider training", which was published in Motorcycle Consumer News, with particular emphasis on Part II, appearing in the June 2004 issue.
     
  16. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

    6,193
    4
    Apr 28, 2002
    Above ground
    I'm glad you mentioned David Hough. He wrote a great book about rider training, that I'd kinda forgotten about. I met David at a BMW National Rally in Missoula, MT in 1998 and we talked for quite awhile about sidecars. ^c

    clic pic

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Eyespy

    Eyespy Proud Infidel

    120
    0
    Sep 2, 2004
    Southern California
    I'm sure that meeting and speaking with him was memorable. He wrote a recent follow-up to Proficient Motorcycling titled More Proficient Motorcycling: Mastering the Ride . These are excellent books for the street rider. There are a number of other educational books on rider training that I highly recommend. They include:



    Sport Riding Techniques: How To Develop Real World Skills for Speed, Safety, and Confidence on the Street and Track by Nick Ienatsch

    Total Control: High-Performance Street Riding Techniques by Lee Parks

    The Soft Science of Road Racing Motorcycles by Keith Code

    Twist of the Wrist by Keith Code

    Twist of the Wrist II by Keith Code

    And a couple of books not on rider training, but on the technical and mechanical aspects of motorcycle design and function:

    Sportbike Performance Handbook by Kevin Cameron

    Motorcycle Handling and Chassis Design, The Art and Science by Tony Foale. This last one is pricey, but worth every penny for technically oriented riders who want to really understand the theory and science of motorcycle chassis and suspension.
     
  18. Eyespy

    Eyespy Proud Infidel

    120
    0
    Sep 2, 2004
    Southern California
    I won't lecture you about how exceptionally unsuitable the R1 (as well as every current liter-class sportbike and 600SS class sportbike) is as a first sportbike, let alone a first street bike. But in case you weren't aware of its existance, I wanted to bring to your attention the R1 Forum, which I help to moderate, since I don't recall your user name over there. There is a great wealth of information available from a number of very experienced and accomplished riders and industry insiders on all aspects of R1 design, modifications, maintenance, and riding. Just be aware that when you register there, you will get a tonque lashing from the more mature and experienced members regarding your choice of the R1 as a beginner bike, but after that, you should derive a lot of added benefit in other ways. You might consider lurking around a short while there to see if you'd like to register and jump in. :)
     
  19. biker

    biker

    76
    0
    Feb 28, 2003
    Coastal Maine

    I would like to hear more on this from yourself if you wouldn't mind. I am curious as I recently became an MSF Certified Instructor/RiderCoach.

    I can definately understand wanting to use 4 fingers on the brake lever. My old goldwing requires me to do so in order to do a quick stop. Some bikes stop fine with only two fingers queezing the front brake but alot don't. It is part of reinforcing safer habits. What if you have to stop suddenly and your two fingers just can't queeze that brake hard enoguht to do it. Maybe 4 could have....

    As for not releasing the rear brake ina rear wheel skid I a have a project for you. Head down the road. Maybe even a crowned road and push on the rear brake lever/pedal till it locks then cause the rear end to swerve in either direction and then let go of the brake.

    PS Wear some protective gear while you do it. It might hurt.



    PSS Im not attacking but since I am new to teaching this stuff I like to see many different points of view and reasoning so i can weed out the good and bad for myself.