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Multiple chambering and clearing of automatic pistol ammo

Discussion in 'GATE Self-Defense Forum' started by ScottieG59, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. Maybe this has been previously covered, but I failed to find it. I have a permit to carry concealed, however, I occasionally go to a facility where I have to unload my handgun and secure it.

    My question deals with the fact that ammo may be chambered more than once before it is used and I am concerned that the bullet could incrementally become set deeper in the case. Eventually, this will cause an increase in pressure, perhaps beyond what the handgun could handle. I expect there will be some distortion of the ammo, though I ma more concerned with excess pressure.

    I have begun to mark each round that has been chambered with a permanent felt-tip pen and arbitrarily limit it to two chamberings and relegate it to range use. Alternately, I could use a micrometer to assess setback. Another possibility is to use a revolver when I must unload and reload more often.

    My primary handgun for carry is a Gen 3 Glock 27.

    I only fire factory ammo in the Glock, however, not all are equal in construction. Some may be more susceptible to to being setback during chambering; others may have features to be able to handle it.

    What are my options to address this issue? Thank you for any insight/advice.
     
  2. Mas Ayoob

    Mas Ayoob KoolAidAntidote Moderator

    4,707
    380
    Nov 6, 2005
    Bear in mind that you've asked a guy who is conservative on such issues. After 2 or 3 chamberings, I'd be inclined to put the round in the practice bin. Or after even ONE chambering if, say, the shooter fumbles when clearing the chamber and the casing or bullet nose become damaged or visibly shorter than a fresh round from the same lot.

    If the need to enter the facility you mention is indeed only occasional, even a dollar-per-round cartridge will be cheap to ensure reliability and absence of critical pressure situations, if you go with the above protocol.

    Best,
    Mas