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Mulitpule DSL Modems On One Line ?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by PEC-Memphis, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

    5,114
    829
    Oct 19, 2006
    Doh ?
    The title pretty much says it all....

    I want to use an ethernet connection to connect to two separate devices on different floors of my house. Running an ethernet cable from where the current modem is located (near one of the devices) to the other device would be a real PITA.

    Can I put two DSL modems on the same line?
     
  2. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    25,808
    1,075
    Jan 26, 2001
    Indiana
    You'd probably have to ask your carrier, but I'm gonna go out on a limb and say probably not.

    Have you considered wireless? As long as someone properly sets up the router and security settings on the network, it's pretty safe.

    A home network wireless router can be had as cheap as $60 to as much as $150, then all you'll need is a wireless adapter for the PC.. USB adapters can be had anywhere from $30-$80.

    IGF
     

    Last edited: Jun 17, 2010

  3. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

    5,114
    829
    Oct 19, 2006
    Doh ?
    I do have wireless - 802.11g.

    I want to use the ethernet connection for streaming video at a television. The ethernet connection seems to have higher throughput than the 802.11g connection. I know - I could use 802.11n - but then I'm replacing the existing router - and I'll have to buy another 802.11n receiver to be co-located with the television (planning on using a laptop without 802.11n at the television).

    As far as the safety of the WEP security - it is good for keeping out most people - however a friend of mine's kid (he's 28) demonstrated how he could break WEP security - he did it in about 5 minutes. Then again - he is in the computer networking and security business.
     
  4. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    25,808
    1,075
    Jan 26, 2001
    Indiana
    If you only have WEP.. trust me, your 13yr old neighbor is able to get on your network. Anyone who can spend 5min googling, can not only learn how to crack a WEP network, but find walk through instructions...it requires zero skill. There is no way in the world I'd use WEP, you might as well just open up your network.

    802.11n probably isn't going to help your situation much anyway...

    Sounds like you have one of two options.. some equipment upgrades, or running cat6. I know it all depends on the setup of the house, etc.. but I've always found ways to run cat6 and keep it out of the way.

    IGF
     
  5. MavsX

    MavsX The Dude Abides

    3,033
    0
    Jan 19, 2009
    Arlington, VA
  6. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    25,808
    1,075
    Jan 26, 2001
    Indiana
    hmm, I totally forgot about those... I wonder how reliable they are? I'm guessing a lot of it depends on the quality of the wiring of the house...

    If I understand them correctly, He'd need one on the TV end, and one on the Router/Modem end... Google turns up lots of instructions and prices on the adapters from $20-$60 bucks..

    Good thinking. (although I think that would be covered under "equipment upgrades" in my suggestion ) ;)

    IGF
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2010
  7. JimmyN

    JimmyN

    1,266
    7
    Sep 29, 2006
    Virginia
    For standard video all the way up to DVD quality 802.11g will work. I can watch DVD's served from the NAS (upstairs) to a PC/TV in the downstairs bedroom over wireless 'g'. It will work fine provided you have a good signal.

    The NAS lan status shows the network bitrate as varying between 5 mbps to a little over 8 mbps for DVD, that's within the range of wireless 'g'. But only the receiving device is wireless, as the NAS is plugged into the router. If the serving and receiving devices were both wireless it probably wouldn't be fast enough since both would be using the same channel.

    But if you want HD then you'll need to go to at least 100 mbps ethernet or wireless 'n'. I can only watch recorded HDTV or Blu-ray movies, stored on the NAS, from the TV/PC in the den as it has an 'n' adapter. The bitrate on HD will run over 25 mbps so obviously it causes a lot of pauses and stuttering on 'g', it's not watchable.
     
  8. Kith

    Kith

    1,601
    1
    Jan 18, 2010
    About those powerline adapters...

    When I worked at Compusa on '01,'02 I saw them on the shelf. Thought it was the coolest thing ever, and brought a set home to play with.

    They were too fickle, and didn't work well. Returned them and brought a new set home, same thing.

    Turns out the central air system messed with it. If a lot of appliances were running (dishwasher, washing machine, etc...) it would mess with it.

    For what you want to do, streaming video, that might not be a good choice.

    Granted, this was 8 years ago, which is the equivalent of saying "when dinosaurs roamed the earth" in the computer world.

    I have no idea how well they work in todays market. If they solved the issue where the frequency of the electricity changes when larger appliances are running, then it could be an easy solution.

    Old info, but something to help arm you in your search.

    Good luck!

    (Personally i'd run cat5 through the wall and call it done. If you can crimp your own connections, you can save a bundle by buying raw cable and cutting your own length, just need the cable, a crimper, a pair of strippers and the connections)
     
  9. MavsX

    MavsX The Dude Abides

    3,033
    0
    Jan 19, 2009
    Arlington, VA