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Match Practice Routine

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by bam1131, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. bam1131

    bam1131

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    Ok, so I am wanting to take shooting in matches more seriously. The closest range to me is an indoor range. There is a great outdoor range that hosts matches but it is an hour away. So for the most part I will have to practice indoor most of the time. I'm wanting to know how do you practice for your matches in an indoor lane. I'm looking for a detailed practice routine that I can use on a weekly basis to help my scores improve.
     
  2. SARDG

    SARDG

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    S. Kargoh and Ron do mostly indoor practice it seems. S. has posted a lot of his personal techniques on this forum.

    Ron's dedication to practicing, and mostly ending up at an indoor range to do it, has seemed to have raised his lead levels. If your outdoor range is only an hour away, go get some fresh air and see if you can participate in oither disciplines. Steel Challenge and Bowling Pins are similar to GSSF and can be shot with a variety of guns. Others like Bullseye for GSSF practice.


    In the rare instances that I go to my closest indoor range, I go when they they are known to be less busy (like I'm alone...) and they let me shoot across 3 lanes. My range in St. Louis before I moved, let me practice draws and tactical work; slicing the pie etc. For that type of practice I think you'll have to develop a pretty good rapport AND find a timeslot where few people (or no one else) is there. If that happens at all...
     

  3. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    You can get a good practice for GSSF with one lane at an indoor range. That's 99.9% of where my practice has occured. I've shot as low as 60 (recently at Griffin, GA).. I've placed second 3 times, 6-7 thirds.... not bad. I'm no Bama or Ed E, but in the upper echelon of Amateurs. I think I've gotten paid at every match I've shot for the last two years (7 matches?).

    There are a couple of skills that most shooting sports require. You can master most of these at an indoor range, but it needs to be one that lets you shoot fast double taps. I've heard some ranges only allow you to shoot shots with at least 1 second gap or something. I realize it's a safety thing, but pretty stupid too.

    1. Presentation - By that I mean, bringing the gun from the "ready" position up to where sights are aligned on target and first shot off. I've seen some people pretty slow with this. You can do a LOT of this practice via dry fire at home, but there's still a big difference from dry fire to live fire. I like to use an 8" target at 10 yards or so. Sometimes I use a 3" target at 10 yards (simulates 8" target at 25 yards). You need to get fast/good at bringing the gun up fast and getting that first shot off.

    2. Controlled/fast double taps. Don't go faster than you can get your hits. In practice, you want to shoot slightly faster than your current skill level. Almost like you're rushing yourself. Then in a match slow down slightly, and it seems like you are going toO slow but you're in control. How fast to go in practice has to make sense... you can't just be spraying bullets everywhere... you need to be hitting 90% or more "good" hits with only a few maybe just missing from the extra speed. 30% good hits in practice is garbage, you're going way to fast

    3. Transitions. I put an 8" target on the far left of the cardboard and another on the far right. Come up with a double on the left, transition as fast as possible to target on right. Do this at distances from 10 to maybe 15 or something.

    5. Distance shooting. Spend a little time shooting 25 yard targets. Not a LOT of time, but do it some.

    6. Pure accuracy. I put this last, but it's the first thing I work on when I get there. I use a very small target (2" diameter?) at maybe 7 yards. I load my magazine only with 5 rounds. I shoot as slow as possible, trying to get all hits inside the target. Don't load your magazine full... by the 5th shot or so, your muscles will be so tired you can no longer hold your arms still enough (if you're shooting slow enough to get good hits).

    7. To wrap up... I never load my magazines full. You need to take short breaks in between everything to shake arms loose, make sure your focus is there. Try to make every shot count. For my accuracy stuff, it's 5 rounds in a mag, and I might shoot 4 mags (20 shots) at one of those small targets. If I didn't do as well as I'd like I might do it again. 40 would be my limit... slow fire accuracy work is tough on the muscles, at least for me.

    Even when I'm shooting #3. I might only put 12 rounds in my mag. That lets me do it 3 times (4 shots first time, second, and third). Do it with another mag and then change targets.

    I do not buy one target and fill it full of holes. I like to keep track of how well I'm doing that session. I've made my own targets with Word and print them out. I change targets multiple times while I'm there. Just making holes in paper and not analyzing what you're doing is a waste of time.

    TIMERS: I can even time myself in my indoor range with other shooters present if they're not right next to me or shooting super loud gun. Timing yourself (set timer on delay so it will beep a start for you and you can see how long it took) will let you see your current speed and progress you make.

    Kitty mentioned my lead levels. Yes, elevated. Not dangerously so, but higher than what is considered acceptable. I've spent 2 hours or so per week for 3.5 years at this indoor range. It is a VERY OLD range, with poor air exchange. An indoor range built today would not be able to get away with this, but I'm sure what it is is they got "grandfathered in" or whatever. If it's a newer indoor range, I can almost guarantee it's not as bad as mine. If you decide to shoot there... might want to get your lead levels checked in 6 months or so or at next annual exam. In my case, I've actually purchased a half-face respirator that I will wear when I go. I'm going to try that for 4 months and see where my levels are. If it drops, I'll continue with that. If it's still high... no more indoors for me, will have to drive somewhere for outdoor. but that's a LONG way, so will be shooting much less.

    To sum it up.... don't think you can't become a good shooter because you're not outside or not able to setup a stage or something. I have gotten to do that 4 or 5 times over the years, that's about it. Rarely get to shoot a plate rack except at a match (can simulate that inside with several 8" targets on cardboard paper and shoot them). And I've shot a 15.xx plate score which averages 3.xx seconds. Again, not a master level score, but not shabby either. Break down the individual "pieces" of shooting as I described above, and practice those pieces. A match is simply all those pieces flowing together.

    It might help if you got involved in IDPA/USPSA locally as well. Gets you match time in front of others, will help not being nervous over that.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
  4. Keyhole

    Keyhole

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    Great post Ron!
     
  5. S.Kargoh

    S.Kargoh

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    Ron, that sounds like my routine pretty darn close.

    Interesting.


    Also, maybe your lead problem is from the paint chips?

    :)
     
  6. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

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    Shoot as great a distance as you can accurately and fire two rounds just like in a match. when you get 100% A/B hits move the target 10 feet. If you can use a timer do so. A 1 hour drive is more or less in your back yard, no reason not to shoot it. If it's USPSA try shooting SS or Revolver, it'll make you more accurate than shooting Open or Limited.
    I should add I'm no Ron59 or Sardg either, but I am Bama's neighbor.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
  7. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur Millennium Member CLM

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  8. TSAX

    TSAX USAF Vet

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    :goodpost:,








    :50cal:
     
  9. Sonic Raptor

    Sonic Raptor

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    Maybe this should be a sticky?
     
  10. SARDG

    SARDG

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    There's already a running Sticky "More GSSF Tips 2003" which contains some of this info. If Ron wanted to re-post this stuff in that Sticky, it may be a good idea.

    Does anyone read that Sticky?
     
  11. stak

    stak

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    I read it over the course of a couple days when I first came here.
     
  12. PM720

    PM720

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    I have read it too.

    Scott
     
  13. SARDG

    SARDG

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    Well, that's three of us...