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looking to get into something, but what?

Discussion in 'The Martial Arts Forum' started by EZFLY80, Sep 16, 2005.

  1. EZFLY80

    EZFLY80

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    Jun 8, 2003
    Truth is, I want to learn how to fight. I want to know that if I get into a hand to hand fight that I will be the winner. I am in the army and going to be a cop and think that it would be good practice for both just in case. I realize they teach tactics in the police academy but sometimes it just doesnt work. I have been looking at brazilian jui jitso as it seems like it may bewhat im looking for, and is in my area, but what else should I consider? Seriously, Im not just looking to beat people up but I want to kick some ass if I have to.
     
  2. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

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    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
    EZFly:

    We need a more accurate portrayal of what you're after.

    "Kick some ass" isn't much of an indicator; if that's all you want, then just carry around a baseball bat.

    Give us an idea of what specific skills you want to learn (try to use as few cliches as possible when responding, that would be very helpful).
     


  3. EZFLY80

    EZFLY80

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    Jun 8, 2003
    I guess I was not as clear as I thought that I was. Basically, if I were in a situation where I was fighting for my life I would like to be able to handle myself. Im not talking about learning something like boxing or karate but instead practical fighting, something that you would use if you were in an all out battle for you life not something for sport. Something like what you see on ultimate fighting where you are trying to put your opponent into submission or knock them out to keep them from doing the same to you, but put that into a real world situation where the the winner makes the arrest or subdues a prisoner instead of going home in a box. Please dont think that I just want to go out and beat people up, I just would like to be prepared for whatever situation may arise and this very well might in my future line of work.
     
  4. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

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    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
    Firstly, it should be said (not to be patronizing, but to be thorough) that anything worth learning is worth taking the time to learn.

    It should also be said (for the same reason) that the instructor is 100 times more important than the method.

    Having said that, the "fighting for your life" as a police officer should involve your firearm, baton, etc. If it's life-and-death, use your gun.

    I recently said in another thread on this forum, and will repeat here to save searching, that the essential unarmed skills for a police officer fall into the following criteria:

    "1) Training to control persons (to effect arrest);
    2) Training to instantaneously react (to fend off a surprise attack, to prevent disarmament, to extricate one's self from a hostile group, etc.);
    3) Training for the eventuality that one's firearm may fail, in order to have skills to "fill in the blanks" between the failure of one weapon, and the acquisition of another."

    Now, consider the above, and ask yourself what meets these criteria.

    Methods which solely teach (or primarily emphasize) striking do not meet criteria 1 (and often do a poor job of 2). Methods which solely teach (or primarily emphasize) grappling do not meet criteria 3 (and often do a poor job of 2).

    Giving a recommendation on a particular method is difficult because, as stated above, the method is worthless without a competent instructor. However, one particular instructor I highly recommend (if you're close enough to him) is Luis Gutierrez of the ISR Matrix program. His contact information is on his website, http://www.isrmatrix.org

    If that proves unworkable, then my recommendation would be to find a program which emphasizes the above-mentioned skill sets.
     
  5. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

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    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York

    And here I thought one of the reasons for starting this forum, was to get away from the "Wolfpack"-style advertising hype of other martial arts forums.

    Also, "Master Mike"? Someone referring to himself as "Master Mike", while berating other martial artists? ;Q
     
  6. Sanchin

    Sanchin

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    Aug 15, 2005
    Arkansas,U.S.
    Doesn't matter what art you take.What matters is how you train.Any art that doesn't employ resistance training in a "live" environment will not be effective.You have to fight to learn how to fight.
    First you have to be trained how to fight properly though,this will take alot of time,but it's worth it.I practice Goju.
     
  7. Sanchin

    Sanchin

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    Aug 15, 2005
    Arkansas,U.S.
    True Masters don't call themselves masters.Nor do they put down other styles or arts.
    You want a good teacher,give him an ego test.A good teacher will be most humble,not boastful.;z
     
  8. bunkerbuster

    bunkerbuster

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    Mar 22, 2005
    CO/CA
    +1
     
  9. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

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    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
    If this had been the sole extent of the retraction, I'd have been more than willing to retract mine as well, and I would have encouraged others to do likewise.

    However, it wasn't. So, my response stands.

    You brought it upon yourself with your ridiculous, hype-filled post.

    In the future, you'd be well-advised to make meaningful, rational posts which contribute to a discussion, as opposed to statement of self-aggrandizement. The members of this subforum are a pretty keen lot, and don't take well to the B.S. found on other Martial Arts/Hand To Hand forums- B.S. which reads very much like your posts.

    Oh boo-hoo ;1
     
  10. Zenhachirou

    Zenhachirou BIG KILLA

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    Oct 17, 2002
    In ya!
    Cross-train, that's how you turn into a machine. No martial art is the ultimate; that's why you do more than one. I do Thai kickboxing, judo, and Brazilian jiu-jitsu and I've never met a man who struck fear in my heart.
     
  11. KYtactical22

    KYtactical22

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    Jun 13, 2004
    I'd also reccomend cross-training. I train in Krav Maga and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. The Krav is like kickboxing/self-defense moves and the BJJ takes care of groundwork and grappling. Both build reflexes, balance, hand/eye coord'n, agility and stamina but it's often the amount of heart you have that helps ensure you go home at the end of the day.
     
  12. bikethief

    bikethief itchy trigger

  13. gr81disp

    gr81disp Bushbot v1.0

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    Sep 19, 2004
    Marietta, GA
  14. Sanchin

    Sanchin

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    Aug 15, 2005
    Arkansas,U.S.
    I do not recommend crosstraining before a good solid base is established in one style. Jumping right into crosstraining will give you sloppy basics in my opinion.
     
  15. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

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    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
    Agreed.
     
  16. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

    543
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    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
    Thank you!

    Refer to my recent exchange with Fedaykin in the Aikido For Law Enforcement thread, I expanded on the same topic there a few days ago.
     
  17. Skpotamus

    Skpotamus

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    Oct 14, 2003
    Terre Haute, IN
    Look into a mixed martial arts school/gym. AKA a NHB school. Typical gyms include boxing, Kickboxing and BJJ. Some also offer traditional arts to pay their bills. I would recommend you get into the MMA program and train hard. You'll learn how to fight by working with other fighters.

    Boasting aside, Krav Maga (real KM taught properly) is used by a lot of law enforcement agencies for weapons disarms (at least the 4 agencies in my area train and use it).

    If you are going to be a police officer though, you might want to look into police defensive tactics programs as you will be heavily restricted to what you can and cannot use during altercations with suspects. Most of what you learn in most styles will be off limits for use.

    Talk to your agencies instructor and see what they recommend to you.
     
  18. Zenhachirou

    Zenhachirou BIG KILLA

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    Oct 17, 2002
    In ya!
    I've studied different styles both one at a time, (TKD) and more than one style at once, (Judo, BJJ, and MT.) And I'd to say that you are very, very wrong. ;) But hey, your mistake, not mine.