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Discussion in 'The Martial Arts Forum' started by Roundeyesamurai, Mar 31, 2005.

  1. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

    543
    0
    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
  2. Mushinto

    Mushinto Master Member

    I posted my reply and I hope I don't sound like a pompas ass.

    Thanks RES.

    ML
     


  3. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

    543
    0
    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
    I'm about to sounds like a pompous ass myself, so we're both in the same boat:

    Being a practicioner of iai or ken is one of those all-consuming things that can't be understood unless it is immersed in, for a significant period of time. It kind of chafes me, the number of folks who get (what I refer to as) "Highlander Syndrome"- "buy a crappy sword and you're an expert decapitator". It chafes me even more, when they proffer their "advice" on swordsmanship to other amateurs.

    This syndrome is even more pronounced in the Martial Arts community- thousands, if not tens of thousands, of instructors who have absolutely no formal sword training, buy a sword and a book on swordsmanship, and accept money in order to teach their students sword work! They legitimize themselves by showing off their rank certificates, but really, they're just as much amateurs as are their students.

    There are, perhaps, two or three thousand legitimate Japanese swordsmanship practicioners in the US and Canada- this number includes all legitimate instructors (numbering in the middle-hundreds), and their currently active students.