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LC 5.56 case prep

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by steelhorses, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. steelhorses

    steelhorses

    345
    0
    May 13, 2007
    GA
    I picked up around 2k LC 5.56 range brass for a good deal recently. I've never reloaded this caliber so a couple questions for you guys -

    1. about 30% of the cases have small dings up to large dents in the cases. I assume these are extractor/ejector marks and the cases (with minor dings) are fine to reload???

    2. maybe 5% of the cases are very hard to fit into the shell holder. The rims are dinged up. Should I toss these or will they reload and shoot fine in an AR15?

    3. I've deprimed them with the lee universal deprimer and have a dillon super swage to remove the crimps. I've swaged a few damaged cases with the swager trying to adjust it to the right primer pocket depth. Primers seat at the right depth but require VERY LITTLE pressure with my older round lee hand primer. Is that normal? I'd hate to be jamming up my Ar15 with the primers backing out of the cases.
     
  2. sig2009

    sig2009

    938
    1
    May 3, 2005
    You don't swage the primer pocket for depth. You swage to remove the crimp. The crimp is only around the base od the case. By swaging too deep you are opening up the primer pocket diameter. That is why they are too loose. What I do is take a once fired commercial round and adjust the swager so it just fits in the primer pocket. Then I put a military crimp one in there and swage it as if I was swaging the commercial one. I get a primer set up and try to prime the case. If it won't go in then I start to swage a little more at the same time retesting with a primer. I do this until the primer seats without any resistance.
     


  3. dudel

    dudel

    5,043
    568
    Dec 10, 2008
    Texas Hill Country
    1) small dings ok; large dents I would toss.

    2) Case heads that would fit the shell holder may not get grabbed by the extractor. Usual outcome is FTE, worse case is broken shell. Have a broken shell extractor available.

    3. .223 is a high pressure round. Loose pockets are not a good thing. They will result in gas erosion of the bolt face (in a AR platform). Not a good thing at all. Loose pockets are generally a result of a way too hot load that stretched the web. I would toss those.

    Where in GA are you? Happy to show you the ropes with that round.
     
  4. I bought some Hebrew mislurp 223 rounds once and quite a few had some pretty serious dents in them. Once fired they fire formed and looked like new. Those rounds that didn't chamber I pulled and full length resized so they would chamber. They fired well too and you would never know they had any dents or dings. YMMV. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  5. MrOldLude

    MrOldLude

    287
    0
    Jan 18, 2010
    With my new LC brass, most/all fits the shell-holder (I think). Some of the older LC brass from surplus M193 that I reload does sometimes go into the shell-holder stiffly. It takes some pushing, but it does fit. My AR eats them without issue.

    Small dings I don't really worry about. They fire-out fine.
     
  6. steelhorses

    steelhorses

    345
    0
    May 13, 2007
    GA
    Thanks guys. I'll try using the swager that way - DUH - all it needs to do is remove the crimp so I can reprime the case.

    I'll toss out cases with dents and rims that have a hard time fitting in the shell holder. No need creating problems for myself.

    Dudel - I'm in Buford. Are we close?
     
  7. rg1

    rg1

    391
    5
    Aug 5, 2003
    Kentucky
    Cases with nicked rims or just slightly bent rims, I use a smooth file to remove any nicks on the edge of the rim and across the head to smooth and flatten the case head. I've had no problems with feeding or extraction with these cases that have been filed. Do the filing before sizing so a slightly bent rim won't effect the amount of shoulder sizing. As long as the case is "sound" there is no need to waste a reloadable case. I wouldn't use them for match shooting but they are fine otherwise.
     
  8. dudel

    dudel

    5,043
    568
    Dec 10, 2008
    Texas Hill Country
    I'm in Ellijay. Maybe about 45 minutes from Gainsville if you go cross country.
     
  9. EL_NinO619

    EL_NinO619 EX-Swage Monkey

    1,615
    0
    Aug 11, 2010
    San Diego
    With the LC brass that is hard to place in the shell holder. I have found that if you put it on the edge of the shell plate and rotate till you find the sweet spot it will slide in. I have used hundreds of rounds that where hard to place in shell holder without any extraction problems. When i load on XDRoX's dillion its never a issue, the is a lot of free play in the shell holders, so i never encounter a snag. Just when Re sizing with Standard shell holders.
     
  10. steelhorses

    steelhorses

    345
    0
    May 13, 2007
    GA
    Cool, just to be safe I'll segregate and mark the cases that were hard to fit in the shell holder. Load them up in separate range magazines so I'll know if they're causing any problems. Thanks guys!
     
  11. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

    2,950
    1
    Aug 4, 2008
    FL
    I would mark those hard to fit cases just like you've indicated. Keep them segregated and use them when you have a less likely potential for recovering them, ie. very sandy or muddy soil, competitions where others are collecting brass, etc.
     
  12. jeepinbandit

    jeepinbandit Sgt. USMC

    393
    0
    Dec 27, 2007
    NAS Fort Worth JRB
    I use a countersink bit from Lowes chucked in a drill press or a hand drill to take my crimps out. Just touch them on there for 1 sec and they are good to go.