Just got back from range new gen 4 19

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by PostsOnPercocet, Aug 19, 2013.


  1. Hi guys, I just got myself a new OD green gen 4 glock 19 and I love just about everything about it. It shoots great, looks great, but I have a small problem.

    I put 150 rounds of regular 9 mil through it and didn't get a single hiccup.

    But I usually carry Speer Gold Dot 124g +p hollow point in my guns so I loaded up a couple of mags and I started to get FTF's. Not all the time, but a couple of times it would hang on the ramp.

    I did clean and lube the gun before I shot it. I racked it a couple of hundred times too.

    I don't think I was limp wristing it, like I said, it behaved with the regular non-hollow point ammo.

    Oh, I'm using the new mags that came with it too.

    So should I just break it in more or is there a problem here?

    Edit:
    I just thought of these so I thought I'd mention them. I remember that when I got the gun I loaded the Gold dots in the mag and manually worked the slide and they did the same thing, FTF.

    I've seen people post that their 19's eject erratically. I noticed that mine eject perfectly, same place every time.

    I took some pics:
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    #1 PostsOnPercocet, Aug 19, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  2. 10 or 15 round magazines?
    What followers are in your magazines?

    I suspect you have the 2183 followers which are known to have feed issues with HP ammo in the G19 with the Gen 4 (ambi cutouts) mags. You can call Glock and have them send you some '9mm3 ' followers and that may fix the issue.
    In the meantime you should be able to shoot FMJ with no issues.

    Here's a thread on another forum that describes the issue in detail:
    http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=741410

    Although in that thread it seemed to be the last round in the mag I did have multiple FTF issues in magazines with certain types of HP ammo, specifically Aguila 117 gr HP's, even AFTER replacing the followers.
     

    #2 34Gee, Aug 19, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  3. Sorry to hear that. I also think a call to Glock is in order and hopefully will solve the problem.
     
  4. SWThomas

    SWThomas The Gunny

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    I wouldn't consider limp-wristing as a possible issue. If a gun won't function properly from all angles and grips, it ain't worth a damn as a personal defense weapon. I would think it's the ammo based on what you described. You may want to try some different PD ammo and see what happens.
     

  5. 10 round magazines that came with it since I live in communist NY.

    My dad and I were just looking at it and it does seem like the followers tilt a bit in the mags. I will call glock.

    Thank you very much.
     
  6. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur
    Millennium Member CLM

  7. Sorry to hear.

    Good luck with it...
     
  8. BINGO!! If you've got 2183 followers, replace them with 9mm3 and you should be good to go!
    GLOCK Inc. should be able to help.
     

  9. OK, just got off the phone with Glock. Told the gentleman the story and he didn't ask any questions, didn't say anything, just asked my the serial # of the gun and my address and then he said they'd be sending out the new followers.

    So that tells me this is a known problem. He didn't try to ask me any more info, try to walk me through anything with the gun, just bam....here ya go.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't think he was rude or short or anything, I just think they get this a lot. I don't know why they are still shipping these followers. Maybe some don't have issues with them?
     

  10. I too, hate when "gun people" say this. My friend has a Colt Officer that started chocking on hollow points. Brought it to a gun store and the guy "checked it out" (for $100) and said he was limp wristing it.

    I asked him why the gun ate 800 rounds of the same ammo before, and why multiple people got the gun to do the same thing.

    "limp wristing" is an excuse IMO.
     
  11. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur
    Millennium Member CLM

    Certainly 'some' don't have any problems ('problems' is a non-politically correct word that means 'issues' :)).

    But, over the years I've heard from more than one Glock employee that 'Austria just doesn't think there's anything wrong with them (2183 followers)'. My best guess is that 'Austria' may only use FMJ ammo? :dunno:

    Although I think it can easily be overused to explain malfunctions, it is certainly not just an excuse.....people do it, I've done it, and I've seen it done all too often.

    Just the other day my wife was shooting my favorite G17 with relatively light loads that work great for me, but she hadn't done any shooting for some time and she had several fail to feed malfunctions.

    She was holding the grip a little low, and I think her grip was weak due to some yard work she'd done the day before. I got her to grip the gun higher, she concentrated on her grip a little more, and the malfunctions went away.

    Shooter fatigue can be a factor.....
     
  12. So just about no semi auto pistol is worth a damn as a personal defense weapon? You put just about any semi auto pistol in my hand and I can make it fail to cycle properly because of a lousy grip. These pistols rely on blowback of the slide to strip the spent round and feed the next. If you hold it loosely enough, it will fail to have the force required to cycle the slide because the frame is being allowed to move rearward with it absorbing the rearward force needed to fully compress the recoil spring. Are you familiar at all with the mechanics of your pistols?
     
  13. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur
    Millennium Member CLM

    Quite correct.

    If you could somehow hang the gun on a string and make it fire without holding it, the whole gun would simply move backwards instead of just the slide moving backwards on the frame to compress the recoil spring.

    The *shooter* has to provide the support needed by the frame so it can remain stationary enough for the slide to move reward against the force of the spring.
     

  14. I dunno, I've seen a test or two where the trigger was pulled with a string and the gun was free to rock back and I didn't see any cycling failures.

    Of course, mileage may vary. I'm sure all of us just want a gun that will fire when we really really need it to.
     
  15. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur
    Millennium Member CLM

    How did they hold the frame still to pull the trigger?

    If you hold it, it will fire..... :)

    If you pull the frame back as you yank the trigger, it may malfunction.
     

  16. Sorta hard to explain. The gun sat on a a device that held it still. It was just a piece of metal sticking up that was attached to a metal base. But it was moveable so the gun could be aimed.

    I know I'm not explaining it very well. Think of those things that hold pens. They used to use them in banks a lot. It was like a pen cap that was attached to the desk and swiveled around.
     
  17. The base of the pistol still needed to be supported to hold the pistol up. My ex had a G19 that would fail to feed or stovepipe on about every other round that she shot. Put it in my hand and not a single malfunction. It was her grip causing the issues. She was gripping it with the correct form, just didn't have the strength to hold it under recoil allowing the frame too much room for movement during her shots. Sometimes the pistol would be able to make it back into battery, but quite a few times the pistol would fail to cycle completely. Every pistol of this type of design is susceptible to this, not just Glocks. Some pistol types are just more susceptible than others. Grip your pistol properly and this is a problem you will never have to be concerned about.
     
  18. Jeffrey Lebowski

    Jeffrey Lebowski Not a golfer

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    Nice they took care of you so quickly!
     
  19. Glocks are known for being easy to limp wrist more then any other gun. There are plenty of videos to prove this.
     
  20. When I first started shooting my Gen2 G19, back in the late '80's, I did THE SAME THING. I couldn't figure out why I was getting some (not many) jams, until someone said I might be limp-wristing the gun. Firmed up my grip, and problem went away. Gun has been flawless since (25 years now).

    Regards,
    AK
     

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