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Just got a charcoal smoker...

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Mrs.Cicero, Aug 19, 2012.

  1. Mrs.Cicero

    Mrs.Cicero Wayward Member

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    now what? I have a fresh ham, or some fresh bacon, I could smoke. Anyone to tell me how to do it?

    Mrs.Cicero
     
  2. ray9898

    ray9898

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    Start with a small bone-in Boston Butt which is a pork shoulder. Easy to prep and forgiving to cook even with fluctuating temps. It is a great starter that takes between 1 and 1 1/2 hours per pound to cook.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2012

  3. MtBaldy

    MtBaldy Obie Wan, RIP

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    What? It didn't come with instructions? You never heard of RTFM?

    I kid. Tell us what you bought and I'm sure you will get lots of advice, some even from me.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2012
  4. dherloc

    dherloc X-Nuc

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    This!

    The fun part is experimenting with the type of rub you want to use.

    Also, give it an hour to rest after cooking (wrap in foil, then in towel and put in a cooler).
     
  5. Snaps

    Snaps Hail 2 The King

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    I've never tried smoking with charcoal, but I've smoked with wood a lot over the years. Like somebody else said, try some pork shoulder, don't start with briskit or anything difficult
     
  6. Diesel_Bomber

    Diesel_Bomber

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    This is good advice. Boston butt = porcine heaven. I like it even better than bacon.
     
  7. tongix

    tongix

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  8. meathead19

    meathead19

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    Learned this yesterday......

    Too much smoke is a bad thing.

    It will make a bitter bark. And yes, start off with a boston butt. Very forgiving and hard to mess up if you follow these two major instructions:

    Get the internal temp to atleast 195 for pulled pork;

    Don't over smoke!
     
  9. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

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    Throw it away!

    Second hand smoke will kill you!
     
  10. FPS

    FPS

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  11. tongix

    tongix

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    Apple wood chunks, the most popular bec of its mild flavor. Avoid mesquite, it will leave a bad taste .
     
  12. MtBaldy

    MtBaldy Obie Wan, RIP

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    Mesquite is for grilling, not smoking. Apple works best with pork and it's good with poultry though I think pecan is best with turkey. Not so much beef.
     
  13. scccdoc

    scccdoc

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    Got rid of my charcoal, though a bit tastier. My electric provides constant temp and occasionally add wood chips to the coil and water to the pan. I'm the favorite person in my church right now ,lol. The flavor is amazing! ~8-10 hrs for a ham at 200-225, that is why I like the electric better, constant temps.............DOC
     
  14. scccdoc

    scccdoc

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    When I smoke, I load it up. ham, chicken, Johnsonville sausage. Each take different times, load the smaller (faster) on the top, slower on the bottom
     
  15. tongix

    tongix

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    Bad sad to smoking is, the meat is liken to a foam sponge . It absorbs the smoke with all the impurities of burning charcoal. THe hydrocarbons and water are absorbed into the meat. Now think about those byproducts of hydrocarbons taken into your stomach from the smoked meat. If your genetic DNAs predisposes you to cancer , you may likely end up with colon , stomach or pancreatic , kidney or liver cancer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2012
  16. Glock2008

    Glock2008 Gun User

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    It's quite likely that almost everything causes cancer. Thats said I just made some Jerky on my new charcoal smoker last night using mesquite. It's possibly the best jerky I've ever had.
     
  17. Mrs.Cicero

    Mrs.Cicero Wayward Member

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    I like those sites, thanks! I'll start with Boston Butt, then use the uncut fresh hams I already have, then go to bacon. Also, I'm tempted to try chicken, because I'm going to slaughter a dozen of them in a couple weeks, and we can only eat so much beer-can chicken, and roast chicken with plum&thai pepper glaze, before I'll get... bored. Things get dangerous when I get bored in the kitchen.:supergrin:

    Mrs.Cicero
     
  18. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    Smoked Ham and Smoked Bacon are typically prepared with a cold smoke process which is not something you do in a charcoal smoker. A charcoal smoker is designed to cook meat at 200-250 degrees (or hotter). Smoking hams and bacon was a way to preserve those items and is typically done in a smokehouse or cold smoker at room temp or lower with a small fire producing a smoke a good distance from the meat but adding little to no heat to the process.
     
  19. Mrs.Cicero

    Mrs.Cicero Wayward Member

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    Apparently Mr.C will not be getting out of building me a smokehouse after all...
    Mrs.Cicero
     
  20. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    What you need to understand is smoking bacon and hams is a way to preserve these items--not cook them. Its a process that literally takes several days and accomplishes the goal of preserving the meat through smoke AND dehydration.

    We used to kill 5 or 6 hogs every December along with a couple other families and we processed those animals soup to nuts... Sausage, bacon, country hams, lard, you name it.
    Our smokehouse was fairly large (maybe 8' X 8' with stone walls. There was a small fire hole about 12" square on one side of the building even with the floor. You built a very small smoldering fire there and kept it going for several days on end.