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Interview with Chuck

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by S.Kargoh, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. S.Kargoh

    S.Kargoh

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    So, after seeing his low scores in so many matches, I figured he was a celebrity that couldn't be bothered to talk to mortals like us. I figured he was out having drinks with Tom Cruise and Hugh Heffner, if he even existed at all.

    I was surprised to learn that Chuck Anderson, the first name on so many score sheets, is a member here.

    I am going to ask us all to interview him, to find out what makes him tick. If we do that, we might be able to capture his essence and sell it at gssf matches. (dibs on profits).

    Mostly, we just wanna know what it's like to shoot so well.




    I am sure we will have lots of questions like, "When did you start shooting?"


    But I will just open up with "How the heck do you shoot plates so fast?"


    When I dryfire, I can't even move that quickly. Do you have a sight picture each time? Is it point shooting? Magic?

    Ede is another guy that can jump in with answers too.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2011
  2. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Retired

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    Don't forget what parts have you "tuned"?

    What is your match ammo? Recipe for reloads.

    How many rounds a year do you shoot? and how much is dedicated to plates and GSSF?
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2011

  3. S.Kargoh

    S.Kargoh

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    Sure, even with sarcasm, some will want to know that stuff.


    I am more intrigued by how a really good shooter thinks and the stories of how he got there, and when he realized he was really good. Etc.

    You can say, "Just shoot a bunch...." But ask mike if that works. (haha, sorry mike).

    I have always been interested in top level athletes or performers. How do they practice? Do they still get nervous like us? Do they work a hundred times harder than us, or is it a natural skill?

    For instance, Lance Armstrong was said to have a resting heart rate ofonly 30 bpm or so. Docs said he was just built more efficiently for endurance sports. Combined with drive, and intense work, he appears to have dominated.

    I rode my bike a lot. Trained a bit. There is NO way, I could have ever competed with him or any pro cycler.

    Is it like that with shooters? Do we all have the same potential? How do we differ?
     
  4. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Retired

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    No sarcasm intended, those would be serious questions.
    At some point, I am going to have to start reloading if I want to get to the low 40s; my best has been a few 46-47ish scores. Hopefully the little bit of lighter recoil will help me reduce scores slightly each stage. On trigger pulling time alone, if lighter recoil helped me at .2 per run, that is two seconds improvement; that doesn't consider what the accuracy benefit might be. Imagine dropping from 8 points in penalties to 4. We are talking 6 seconds improvement. I would take that on mid50s scores.

    One thing about shooting a lot, more specifically practicing a lot, it isn't practice makes perfect, it is perfect practice makes perfect.

    Repetition of the plates, when shooting correctly, helps improve results. Hopefully reloading will allow me to practice more because it should be cheaper. Knowing your weaknesses and addressing them is part of improving. If you ALWAYS hit A/B on the close targets of the Glock 'M, how much should you practice them?

    Your potential question is interesting. Biomechanics and vision and muscular strength are going to vary from person to person, and although we aren't talking Tour de France or Olympic Marathon, the slight differences will make a difference.

    I would think that Chuck, being an experienced shooter, doesn't get as nervous about shooting competitions as newer shooters and his mental approach to the game will be interesting to know, but advice like "...calm down, watch your breathing and don't get stressed...' will have to be (l)earned through getting out there and doing it.
     
  5. mike g35

    mike g35

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    Just for the record (and I think it was me you were talking about) NO shooting alot doesn't help. But Bama is right, its how you practice not how much you practice. Since I decided to shut up and start listening to the people here that are willing to help me my shooting has improved but only because the way I practice has improved.
     
  6. S.Kargoh

    S.Kargoh

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    Sorry, i thought you were razzing me, there for the "interview". Yeah that is all interesting stuff to me. It's cool to have you good shooters/competitors here to "probe."

    :)
     
  7. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Retired

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    Build off good stuff. End practices with on hits not misses.
    Set (reasonable) goals. I want to shoot as slow as I need to go clean on the Glock M, or slow enough for no Ds. Not "I am going to run the plate racks in an average of 3.75 per run" when you haven't pulled the trigger in 3 months.
    Realize shooting is fun and it is a hobby (unless your sponsor is paying you to win, then it is a job). Have fun.

    I looked at the people that were shooting ahead of me and made the goal of catching Shooters X, Y, and Z. Once I did that, I picked some more people. Once I reached them, I looked at the next person shooting consistently better than me and I am trying to reach them now.:supergrin:

    I have never shot a clean match and I have never broken 45. While the clean match would be nice, I would rather break 45. Do do that, I need to decrease my penalties and keep my focus on the plates, i.e stop shooting a sub 3, pair of mid 3 low 4s and a 5+.

    Shooting more might help me. Right now, the last time I pulled a trigger on any live round was the Dawsonville match 2 months ago. That doesn't bode well. I may take the 23rd off and practice.:faint:
     
  8. SARDG

    SARDG

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    This is an intersting thread - but my screen must be a little fuzzy. I see "BamaTrooper" and "practice" within the same post.
     
  9. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Retired

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    It's only cheatin' if it helps you beat me :tongueout:
     
  10. SARDG

    SARDG

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    I told you before - I'm twice the shooter you are! And there lies the problem. :crying:
     
  11. DEJ/FL

    DEJ/FL Millennium Member

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    According to EDE, thats cheating!:supergrin:

    Dan:cool:
     
  12. yobohadi

    yobohadi Peon Trainee

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    I am not a good shooter but I found something that is helping me a lot. I had a buddy tag along with me to the last GSSF match and he video taped me every time I shot, getting the targets and myself in the frame. I suggest either getting someone to record your performance or get a tripod and set it up to record yourself every time. I have learned so much at watching myself shoot that I will even take my video recorder with me to my practice sessions.

    I noticed from the video that I am taking the time to see where the bullet hit on the target when I should be transitioning to the other target by then. I also noticed that I have paused on the Glock'M stage because I went to aim at the pepper popper that I shot the string before. I also did not make the decision on the order of my targets on Glock'M so I started to swing my pistol to the next NRA D-target and swung back to shoot the popper. There many other little things that I did to add time to my score that pop out at me when I watch the videos that I don't realize I am doing when shooting. Now I can review my performance and try to make the blatant messups go away for the next match.
     
  13. triggerjerker

    triggerjerker

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    I noticed from the video that I am taking the time to see where the bullet hit on the target when I should be transitioning to the other target by then.


    Besides trigger pull thats the biggest mistake made by new shooters.
     
  14. SCC

    SCC Member Me

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    ok where is chuck ?:dunno:we want to know what's it's like to be a master :whistling: at the game of gssf :whistling:
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2011
  15. S.Kargoh

    S.Kargoh

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    Duh, he's probably practicing.


    :)
     
  16. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

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    Well thanks and let it be known I didn't pay for that endorsement. I don't mind answering questions, but I can tell you for sure there are many who know more and shoot better than me. Lot of people think I'm either messing with them or not wanting to answer but I have a hard time telling what I do, or how to shoot.

    There are so many here who can offer help, tips, and insight without being a Master or a match winner. Don't take anyone or anything for granted.

    I know Chuck, sort of, spoke with him quite a bit by email. I'm shooting a Chuck Anderson built STI .40 1911 this year in Single Stack.
     
  17. MajorD

    MajorD

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    since being bumped to master for next season I will be trying to figure out not how to get into the high 40's or even 50's by looking at the big picture but how can I shave just one second per string off my best times so far? that will put me in the running for master class prizes next year.My scores right now are in the high 60's on my best day.
     
  18. The Highlander

    The Highlander

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    This is a great thread, and I hope some more really good shooters will chime in with tips. I am not a great shooter, but I'm an inveterate plinker, and getting better at GSSF. Hopefully no one will mind me offering suggestions. One thing that I've found helped my scores on the plates is practice. Duh.

    I don't have a plate rack available, so I made a really cheap version by taking a couple of yard sale signs from Lowes and clipping paper plates to them. Since I'm also trying to learn to focus on my front sight, I shoot a lot with .22's. It is also obviously cheaper. I'll make practice runs on my plate rack with a .22, and I always end the session with runs on my GSSF guns, a 17 and a 17L currently.

    To get the distance correct, I have a cheap piece of twine with a piece of bright pink surveyors tape at 11 yards. Actually, mine is marked all the way to 25 yards. It is easy to make with a tape measure, weighs much less and is easy to carry in a range bag.

    You can use the same idea and set up your own GSSF stage(s) to practice on. I have enough of my yard sale target stands to replicate all of the stages. Total cost was maybe $25. Not including the paper plates.
     
  19. GlockinNJ

    GlockinNJ

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    TAGGED. So much great info here.

    I like the video tape idea. I used to video tape my golf swing and what an eye opener that was!

    I also like the idea of practicing plates and target transition with a .22. It's a way of practicing while removing the recoil variable, allowing you to isolate and just work on the motion. Then you can add recoil later. Almost like dry fire, but better!
     
  20. SCC

    SCC Member Me

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    had a guy ( RO ) at a gssf match let me shoot a mag of his ammo ( .40 ) and it had no recoil at all he said they were made for gssf match's he asked me what ammo i was shooting and i told him it was wwb ball ammo from walmart ..
    He told me where to get it but i could not find them ?