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IDPA Variety?

Discussion in 'General Competition' started by ADK_40GLKr, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. ADK_40GLKr

    ADK_40GLKr

    2,337
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    Nov 14, 2010
    RFD NY Adks
    The other night at my first club visit, we all shot a 3 stage "classifier" of 90 rounds.

    How many different courses of fire are there in IDPA?

    How many stages and rounds should I expect?

    Is a stage always 30 rounds?

    Or would they just shoot a classifier every week?
     
  2. chaplain 31

    chaplain 31

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    Classifiers are used to establish a shooters basic skill level so they can compete with other shooters with simular abilities. In most clubs a classifier is only shot once or twice a year. The rest of the time a wide variety of stages are used that the rules limit to 18 rounds each. It's been my experience that there are very few repeated stages which helps keep the competion from becoming routine. Good luck... hope you enjoy the fellowship and competition.
     


  3. Hoser

    Hoser Ninja

    2,351
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    May 22, 2002
    Some clubs are different.

    There is any many stages are the course designers have imagination.

    I doubt they would run the classifier every week.
     
  4. waktasz

    waktasz Gamer Scumbag

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    Aug 10, 2002
    Philly Area
    The classifier is the worst thing about IDPA. Those matches take forever and are boring, but it's the only way we have to "rank" people.

    Your next match will be much more exciting.
    Here's a typical match [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lyh8XCeuDdI"]Lower Providence IDPA December, Glock 35 - YouTube[/ame]
     
  5. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    Smyrna, GA

    You just had bad timing. Often, it's *difficult* to find a classifier when you need to shoot one (supposed to shoot one every year).

    Matches are very different from classifiers. And are usually quicker. Most matches I shoot start at 10 and are done by 1 or 2. The last classifier I shot took until 4PM or something like that.

    Classifiers are pretty boring too, but as has been said, it is how IDPA *determines* how good you are (Novice, Marksman, Sharpshooter, Expert, Master). There's an entire section in the rule book on the classifier. The rule book is available as a PDF file online.
     
  6. HK Dan

    HK Dan

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    Stages in a regular match are invented solely for that match. You probably won't see the same stage twice (unless your match director really liked it or is "phoning it in"). They'll go from a single round to 18 rounds per string, and there can be an unlimited number of strings per stage. They typically don't go over 4, but I made one with 15 strings! (fun stage).

    In short, it will not be the same match every month, it will always be different. The round count will vary as much asthe stages, but a club typically has a goal round count; they'll want at least 70, or at least 100, etc. They will typically run as many stages as they have space for. I know one group that runs 2 stages, and ours runs as many as 10. In short, it's highly variable, always different, and only your match director knows for sure. <g>
     
  7. ADK_40GLKr

    ADK_40GLKr

    2,337
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    Nov 14, 2010
    RFD NY Adks
    Plattsburgh R & G must keep doing the Classifier til everybody's happy. I know I'm not yet!

    I ended up even further down in Novice than last week. Procedural screwups on Stage 3: forgetting to reload on one string that required a tactical reload, and then stopping to add a shell to my mag when I was 1 short shooting the last string from behind the barrel and didn't have any spare mags left. AAAARRRRGGGHHHH! I should have just allowed it to go as a -5.

    Stages 1 & 2, I had actually improved on!
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
  8. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

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    Oct 19, 2006
    Doh ?
    Nope. The maximum number of required rounds is 18, per string. The stage can require more.

    Unless limited, the maximum per string is 31.
     
  9. chaplain 31

    chaplain 31

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    Nov 3, 2011



    That is correct... round count is limited to 18 per STRING... not per STAGE.
     
  10. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson

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    Jul 10, 2001
    Alabama
    Now you know why in my Four Priorites, Execution comes second only after Safety and ahead of even Accuracy and Speed.
     
  11. ADK_40GLKr

    ADK_40GLKr

    2,337
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    Nov 14, 2010
    RFD NY Adks
    Wasn't aware of your 4 priorities until just now, but they make sense to me.
     
  12. Was the club actually running the qualifier, or just practising it?

    Should clubs even be practising it? I don't know.

    Kinda like the SAT. Take it multiple times and your score might go up. Practise for it, and your score might go up. Some schools, parents, and kids might get obsessed with the SAT. But somewhere in the background, the more important thing should be actual education and not standardized testing.

    Just create some stages and have fun :)
     
  13. ADK_40GLKr

    ADK_40GLKr

    2,337
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    Nov 14, 2010
    RFD NY Adks
    Hmmmm! Interesting question. Why not, though? Anything in the Rule Book against it?

    We are probably practicing. Rather academic for me anyway, as I'm still below "Marksman" for ESP.:faint:
     
  14. I don't know. I was just wondering out loud. Probably is nothing against it.

    I don't know the correct way to do things. I just go to the line when told, and shoot where I'm told to :)
     
  15. ADK_40GLKr

    ADK_40GLKr

    2,337
    7
    Nov 14, 2010
    RFD NY Adks
    I think the SAT analogy would break down because new SAT questions are made up every time the test is given, and never revealed (intentionally) until the packet is opened at test time.

    IDPA CoF is published for all. And practicing for the Classifier can only improve our self defense skills which IDPA is all about. (IMHO which is just a noob opinion anyway). I think we should sit down and discuss this over a beverage, next time I'm in Ithaca this spring/summer.:cheers:

    BTW - just received my Club Shot Timer from Midway today, so I can practice more intently for the Classifier.
     
  16. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

    5,114
    827
    Oct 19, 2006
    Doh ?
    Unless a limited string/stage the limit per string is division capacity. With the maximum REQUIRED being 18.
     
  17. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    Smyrna, GA
    Practicing the classifier when you're "new" and your skill levels are low (ie, SS or below) is definitely a good thing. It forces you to do things that you might not do in a normal practice (reloads on the clock, moving, etc).

    However... once you start moving up through the ranks... you might want to practice it a little less, and instead shoot more matches. I say this, because if you spent LOTS of time practicing the classifier, you might could get to the point where you're a Master shooting that, but really not that good at shooting CoFs that you're not familiar with? It would be easy to get over your head, so to speak.

    I've read several internet "stories", that talk about guys who have practiced lots and lots on the classifier and became Master, but when in a match shot more like a high SS. That's because their true fundamentals (movement, strategy, etc) weren't finely honed and they couldn't get their minds around unfamiliar stages.

    Just something to think about.

    But yeah... if you're still below Marksman, you can/should practice it as much as you want until you start getting comfortable with the routines. But again... LOTS of stuff (drawing from holster and reloads) can and should be practiced in dry fire sessions. You will get much better, quicker that way.