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I failed the riding test....what a TINY circle!

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by lilslyk, Nov 5, 2005.

  1. lilslyk

    lilslyk

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    Oct 11, 2004
    So, somewhat arrogantly, I went to my riding test Thursday morning expeccting to pass no problem and get my full out license. I had never seen the cone/circle course, let alone tried it.

    The examiner gave me one "trial run" at it, and I did put my foot down halfway around the circle once. On the real go, I made it 3/4 around the circle but then had to put the foot down or risk dropping the bike.

    Now I have to go and practice and hopefully get good enough at that to pass it on my FZR 600R. I have about 1200 miles of riding experience and had considered myself pretty decent at low-speed maneuvering, but I was humbled that day.

    Can't wait to go there and practice (maybe tomorrow afternoon) so that I can get my full blown license...not that it has kept me from riding at night or on the freeways (sometimes both!), but I don't like doing illegal things.
     
  2. ateamer

    ateamer NRA4EVR

    Take an MSF class. You will learn proper low-speed maneuvering. Learning on your own, you will learn all kinds of bad, possibly deadly, habits. I was taught to ride by motor officers and took the MSF class after six or seven years of riding experience. Still learned some good stuff. You owe it to yourself to get professional training.

    Also, don't fall into the trap of thinking you have plenty of experience. 1200 miles is a two day ride for lots of riders.
     


  3. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

    6,193
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    Apr 28, 2002
    Above ground
    Sport bikes, particularly the ones which are used as the basis bike for racing, are the worst for tight manuevering because their limited amount of steering lock, stubby bars and more forward weight bias. Try it on a dual sport, we used to call them enduros, and see how much easier it is.
     
  4. Rosey

    Rosey

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    Mar 19, 2005
    Chandler, AZ
    ;Q for sure

    Who posted that video of the Japanese police riding in that cone-course competition? I think they were on police modded CBR1000 Hurricanes, IIRC. Those guys had skills (and practice!)...

    Was that you who found that, fnfalman?
     
  5. Texas T

    Texas T TX expatriate CLM

    1,935
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    Jan 25, 2000
    W7YBY
    Or a one day ride for these folks...
    http://www.ironbutt.com/about/default.cfm


    If you chose to NOT take the MSF class but still want to learn how to control your bike at slow speeds (as well as other training) order this DVD...
    http://www.ridelikeapro.com/

    I've recommended it several times and never had anyone disagree with me once they saw it.
     
  6. lilslyk

    lilslyk

    61
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    Oct 11, 2004
    I absolutely do not think I have "plenty" of experience at riding a bike...however I do feel I am capable of riding one at night or on the freeway as the permit restricts.

    I realize 1200 miles is not very many, but I forgot to mention that 80%+ of those are city commuting miles...which in my opinion develops skills a lot quicker than cruising along (or even riding the twisties) because you get a lot of starts/stops and more things happening around you.

    I have always intended to take the MSF course, problem is they're always filled up 2+ months in advance and I am not sure hwen I am in or out of town that far ahead.

    Thanks for the advice, will definitely take a look at the ridelikeapro website.
     
  7. shark_za

    shark_za Woes

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    Jun 11, 2003
    JHB - South Africa
    Use a dual sport for your test, you'll be suprised how easy they are to ride.
    Wide bars, comfortable seating position.
     
  8. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

    50,522
    3,280
    Oct 23, 2000
    California & New Mexico, US
    Yep,

    Ride Like a Pro is a good help, as is the MSF course. Doing the slow maneuverings are the tough parts. Anybody can haul ass on a straightaway.

    But don't be discouraged, it's not suppose to be too easy. In Commiefornia, you have to negotiate a decreasing radius circle.

    Also, see if you can borrow a small 250 like the Nighthawk or something like that for the test.
     
  9. Three-Five-Seven

    Three-Five-Seven Señor Mombo Millennium Member

    2,727
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    Aug 8, 1999
    Great Southwest
  10. Cryptoboy

    Cryptoboy Sr. Sr. Member!

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    Dec 15, 2004
    Tempe, AZ
    When my wife and I were taking the Basic MSF course, they had and advanced/expert level course on the other range. Those riders had to bring their own bikes, and they were doing the test as well. Watching those guys on their full size Goldwings and Harley touring bikes was about the most impressive thing I'd seen (up to that point!) I was worried that I couldn't do the figure 8 with the little Honda Rebel that they had me on! :)
     
  11. VWglocker

    VWglocker

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    Jun 8, 2004
    Charlotte, NC
    i failed the first time too. on my dads PC800, which is a good sized bike. the problem with our testing area was the turn around after the cones. there was just no room. i never saw anybody make it.

    soooo, i took the MSF course and i'm glad i did. i'm a better rider for it and it made my mom happy.

    also, if you take the course (at least in NC, you don't have to pass the cone test at the DMV)
     
  12. Neller0414

    Neller0414

    5
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    Oct 25, 2005
    Flint, MI
    i passed easily the first time on a sv650 from the local dealer. they let me "demo" it. it was a great bike for the test, but dont know how much better it would be than the fizzer you got. now that you know what to do, just practice for a few hours and u will be good to go.
     
  13. Texas T

    Texas T TX expatriate CLM

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    Jan 25, 2000
    W7YBY
    Here ya go. These guys are incredible. I'd have dropped my bike half a dozen times before I made it through the course.

    http://2st.dip.jp/bikemovie/src/up5837.wmv
     
  14. I just took my Virginia motorcycle skills test. Part of that was to make a U turn inside two lines, 20 feet apart. I didn't have much trouble doing that in the parking lot where I practiced it after about 100 times of not doing it. When I went to DMV, though the test area had a slight downhill slope. To do the U turn, you have to uphill, then make the turn. The uphill slope kills your speed faster than you expect it. Then when you go into the turn, the slope of the hill forces you to lean more outside than you're used to.

    On the S turn part of the test, you have the opposite problem. You're going downhill for that part of the test, so you're going faster than you have practiced at.

    After I passed, I said something to the tester about not expecting the slope to make that much difference. She said almost nobody does those two parts perfectly the first time. I didn't either, but did well enough on the other parts to pass.

    Oh. one other thing. There was a brick wall on three sides of the test area too. Not a lot of runnoff area if you were to make a mistake. That brick wall looked mighty intimidating.
     
  15. hapuna

    hapuna Trusted Member

    734
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    Apr 22, 2002
    Washington
    We had a box where we had to do a figure 8. I thought that was the hardest! It was a small box.;P Oh yeah and it was raining like hell.
     
  16. Rosey

    Rosey

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    Mar 19, 2005
    Chandler, AZ
    Yeah! That's the one. Neat...
     
  17. F14Scott

    F14Scott Luggage CLM

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    Sep 13, 2001
    Katy, TX
    What was your technique? For slow speed maneuvering, you'll have much better luck if you set intermediate throttle, slip the clutch at a constant rate, and modulate your speed with rear brake.
     
  18. Short Cut

    Short Cut PatrioticMember CLM

    6,193
    4
    Apr 28, 2002
    Above ground
    Great point Scott about the rear brake. It really helps to hold a tight line in a corner. I learned that riding dirtbikes and it translates well to slow speed street bike stuff too. That's why I hate bikes that have linked brakes where the back brake activates the front brakes too.
     
  19. F14Scott

    F14Scott Luggage CLM

    4,297
    448
    Sep 13, 2001
    Katy, TX
    I ride a '99 VFR with LBS (linked brakes) and it doesn't seem to matter, low-speed (or high-speed, for that matter). I've not noticed any negative characteristics with the LBS (except perhaps added weight and complexity), only positive handling effects for street riding and spourt touring, but I'm admitedly not a 10/10ths rider.

    In my opinion, it's not the front/rear bias of the braking that makes using the rear brake steadier while low speed, it's the fact that you're using a pedal that is faster responding, is more linear, and had only a single variable.

    When you use idle/light throttle and feather the clutch, you're constantly advancing and retarding throttle, slipping the clutch in and out, and even sometimes adding/releasing brake. That's three controls to modulate.

    When you set intermediate throttle and clutch, that's it, you forget about them. Now, all further speed adjustments are handled by the rear brake pedal. Holding the brake pedal halfway down, you can quickly "add power" by releasing it or "remove power" by depressing it further.

    I've not ridden on dirt, so I can't speak to your comment, but I suspect you may be talking about sliding the rear in a tight corner. That would be difficult with LBS.
     
  20. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

    50,522
    3,280
    Oct 23, 2000
    California & New Mexico, US
    I don't like fully integrated braking system where either the hand lever or the foot lever would activate both brakes. I prefer the way BMW sets up the partially integrated brakin system where the hand lever will activate the front and rear brakes and the foot lever only activate the rear.

    But that's pretty much subjective because lots of people prefer non-linked brakes.