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Hunting Dogs

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Sixgun_Symphony, Nov 20, 2003.


  1. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony
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    What kind of dogs do you use and for what kind of hunting?

    Would you post a photograph of your hunting dog(s) and tell us something about 'em?
     

    Wanna kill these ads? We can help!
  2. LawRand

    LawRand
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    This will be my duck blind partner next year. Chocolate lab born 9-4-2003. Named Beau Jeste. Excellent hunting line from a fairly local breeder that I checked out with other hunters. He's quite a bit bigger than in this picture. We are doing obedience training (sit, stay, come) and retrieves as a game. I have very high hopes.
     

  3. TJC

    TJC
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    I have 2 Drahthaars that I use for upland birds. One is just about 13 years old the other is 20 months. She is a pip but coming along fine.
    In fact, just got back in from a morning of pheasant hunting. Shot 4 birds over these 2.
    They are basically German Wired Hair Pointers. The only tech. difference between them and a German Wired Hair is that the Drahthaars are all German blood lines and no AKC. It doesn't matter to me but some people get a bit touchy about it.
    Dogs are great companions, good temperment, and great hunters. A bit larger than Shorthairs in the chest area. My puppy is 70 lbs. She's in good shape, just a bit on the large side for a female. The older gal is thinning due to age but was about 60 or so lbs in her prime.
    Sorry, can't do photos. Wish I could because I love to show these girls off. ;e
     
  4. Craigster

    Craigster
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    Brittneys. Babe, 9 years old (in the shadow) and Gage, her son 3 years old , backing her point. After my shot Gage retrieved the Roster to hand. This weekend we bagged two limits of wild Rosters, all off of point.
     
  5. Craigster

    Craigster
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    Babe and Gage at Elk camp, resting next to the stove after doing the dishes.
     
  6. mpol777

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    Craigster, I'm completely jealous. Great looking dogs.

    Are Bittneys the natural hunters that everybody says they are? Once we get some room for another dog I want a Brittney. Until then it's chihuahuas on point. ;f
     
  7. D25

    D25
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    <-----Patra Lee, 2 YO yellow lab.

    She just went on her first duck hunt, and passed with flying colors.
     
  8. Craigster

    Craigster
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    777,

    My friend and I have been breading/hunting our line for almost 25 years so I can only speak of our dogs to answer your question………. yes they are natural hunters and also great house/family dogs. The only things I have to teach them is come, sit, stay, field commands and common courtesy, the rest is in the blood.

    Ive spent alot of time, hunting and casual, around most of the other pointing breads and the Britt comes out on top for me as a general upland hunter who wants to have a very good pointing hunter that the rest of the year have a buddy that my wife and grandkids can spoil. English Setter would be number two.

    BUT BUT BUT ......... like any other bread, watch out for bone heads. If you are considering any dog be sure to look at mom, dad and contact anyone that ownes offspring if possible.


    --------------------------------------------------

    TJC,

    One of the two best upland dogs I can remember, well.......outside of my own, was a wire hair 23 years ago owned by a friend of more years than that. Tish was a very methodical and Pheasant wise dog that lived to hunt so we had to forgive her once a week habit of going on point then catching the pheasant in mid air before a shot was fired. Very soft in the mouth so if it was a hen we could release it without harm. Not the preferred result but how in the world do you break a dog of that. Also when she retrieved Quail all that was visible were two little feet sticking out of her hairy mouth. She was a great dog.
     
  9. duncan

    duncan
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    Lucky guys.

    I'd love to get a basset hound for rabbit hunting.

    But the wife says no dogs in this house.

    So I'll need to buy another house!
     
  10. LawRand

    LawRand
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    ...or get another wife!!! ;f ;f ;f

    (Duncan, your friend from the gun store was supposed to have a woman e-mail me pics. She never did. I assume the CDE is gone now.)
     
  11. TJC

    TJC
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    Craigster,
    I came into the breed by accident. A close friend of mine passed away and I got the dog from his wife. About a year and a half ago, I thought we were losing her. Fortunately, it wasn't what the 3 different vets thought it was and she is fine. But I had gotten on the list for a new pup soooooo now there are 2.
    The Drahthaars are great all around and both of these are very soft mouthed. My young one will once in a while do the same as your friends would. We're working on it. Went out today to the gun club (put and take for pheasants and chuckars). Between myself and the others who tagged along with the dogs, we put up 20 birds and got 16. Not a bad day. Some really good tracks and points which is what I am looking for more than the birds. Love to watch the dogs work. Especially the new one.
    Enjoy the rest of the season.
     
  12. Craigster

    Craigster
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    TJC,

    Good job. Sounds like your dogs are doin' great. Isn’t it fun showing them off?

    Interesting, the Wirehair I hunted over belonged to my friends dad. The year I met Gordy (the son) was the year after his dad passed away and my first year over my first bird dog, a Britt pup.. His dad had quite a reputation as a dog man, something Gordy inherited and over the years has taught me more about dogs than I will admit to him.

    As far as breaking a dog of catching birds in the air, if you can figure out a way without ruining the huntability of the dog good luck. We just put up with it because, from her standpoint, isn’t that the reason we are all there. She thought she was doing good.

    I agree with you, the reason I go Pheasant hunting isn’t just to kill the birds but more importantly to watch experienced, well trained dogs work. For the last two years I have enjoyed my older dog, Babe, teaching the pup, Gage, then watch the light come on and put the lessons to use. A first for me because I have never owned two dogs at the same time. IM loving having two and IM sure you will to.

    As a side note Babe has gone completely deaf, three years now, and I have gone to silent hand/hat signals which Gage has also learned. Advantage, they must be in sight and paying visual attention to me rather than just hearing distance. I have not used my whistle in the last three trips this year and have more control than I have ever had with any of my dogs.

    I think when all is said and done they can teach us more than we can teach them. For example, never doubt a point, even if it’s at the rear wheel of the truck.

    If you can, love to see some pics. Sorry about mine, I carry a cheap digital and IM a little occupied.

    Enjoy your season.
     
  13. tjpet

    tjpet
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    Waterfowl - Chesapeake Bay Retriever

    Everything else - German Shorthair
     
  14. Esox357

    Esox357
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    I'm on my third German Shorthair Pointer, that is the only breed I have had in dogs although Drathaars and Wirehairs look interesting as well for upland game. The nose on my first GSP has me sold that with the correct lineage they are fantastic in the field. The GSP is very versatile as well to hunt other game, I have even heard them being used as tracking dogs for deer hunting. Esox357
     
  15. 40 glock

    40 glock
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    This is my girl at 10 weeks its alittle hard to tell but in the lower right thats a bird. She's locked up tight its been easy sailing ever since. She goes everywhere with me in the house in the field Ive never seen such a smart dog and around my boys? forgetaboutit she's gentle as they come.
     
  16. Sundog

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    This is Abby, my labrador retriever. She's a decent retriever, and a terrific family dog! She's three years old.
     
  17. PlasticGuy

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    I've got a black lab named Sadie, born May 8 of this year. She's a bit over six months old and is already pointing pheasants and quail for me, although she hasn't quite worked up enough confidence to flush with regularity. She's a fetching fool though, and literally races the other dogs to downed birds so that she can bring them back. Great enthusiasm, reasonable restraint, and only six months -- she's gonna be a force to be reckoned with next year.

    And she's a damn fine family pet, too. She's a truly spoiled hunter. ;)
     
  18. Quake Guy

    Quake Guy
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    Check out the pic to the left. A German Shorthair in training.

    Unfortunately she is gunshy and I am unable to correct the problem. I probably introduced her to too much too fast...

    Originally, she was not bothered by me shooting a variety of .22 loads through a rifle. I eventually worked my way up to regular .22 LR while standing over her and she didn't care.

    I then had her tied up about 25 yards away from shooting a .38 & M1 Carbine and she has been gun shy ever since. I guess I didn't realize how much an increase in sound that would be...

    Anyway, I tried again last weekend starting from the beginning. I shot .22 Aguila powderless rounds, no problem. However, using .22 blanks freaked her out again. Despite how many pupperoni treats I tried to give her.

    Any advice???
     
  19. PlasticGuy

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    I guess I just got lucky. Mine went with us to a very loud 4th of July fireworks show when she was 2 months old, and slept through most of it. Shotguns are fun because she gets to chase birds. She has never been bothered by noise at all, but I can't claim to have taught her anything -- it's just dumb luck. Good luck with yours.
     
  20. 40 glock

    40 glock
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    Is she birdy? I mean really really birdy. are you associating the shot to a bird? Or are you just letting her stand there and watch you shoot? What Im trying to get at is if you can get her attention focused on a bird (i.e. I throw a clipped bird right in front of my dog early on when the dog takes off the bird goes up BANG with the .22 then the bird comes down a short distance later with her on a check cord, it is forcing her to mark where the bird fell) Now she associates the bang with the bird. Now when she's in the field and she hears a bang she automatically looks up for the bird. If yours is this bad now you may have to have a friend help you with the .22 some distance away. then work it up untill eventually over her again.

    Ive heard of other meathods of associating food with the shot. while your dog is hungry as all get up you shoot the gun first at a distance then slowly moving up. They say that if you are in the woods it helps if your dog gets lost she thinks she's getting fed and finds you if you shoot your gun. Either way it seems the principals are the same, make the shot mean something the dog likes.

    Hope this helps.