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How do Missisippi cities dispose of confiscated guns

Discussion in 'Mississippi Glockers' started by NRA_guy, Oct 8, 2007.

  1. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Unreconstructed

    1,704
    0
    Jun 20, 2004
    Mississippi, CSA
    I asked in another thread here in Mississippi Glockers, but got no response to the question, "How do cities in Mississippi get rid of confiscated guns?"

    They are claiming to "take thousands of guns off the streets" every year.

    So, I looked it up. Here is the published state guidance to counties. This is for counties. Not sure how this relates to city PD gun disposal.

    Might be really interesting to find out how Jackson and other cities are doing it. I am betting that they don't follow the rules. Just a hunch.

    SOURCE

    And this friendly advice to the State of Mississippi from our friends at the BATF in response to the question:

     
  2. OXCOPS

    OXCOPS

    13,045
    1
    Dec 31, 2000
    AZ
    Since most guns taken are associated with felony charges, they will be sent through each county's Circuit Court. All major felony cases go through here, no matter if they are city PD, county SO, university, or other cases. Since the Sheriff is the Chief LEO of the county, and the LE agency associated with Circuit court security, the duty to dispose of seized items falls upon him, or his designee.

    If they don't destroy them, they are usually "auctioned" to local FFLs. However, this is rare since most agencies tend to hang on to their evidence due to appeals, which can drag on for years. Think about that crackhead on death row, who is still appealing his murder convictions from the 1980's. Since a new trial could be ordered at any time up until his execution, the evidence must be retained.

    I have personally performed a routine catalog of firearms in evidence at my old PD that were first entered before I was born. Some are still from cases on appeal. Others just haven't been disposed of. Since it's not illegal for them to just sit there, it's often not a top priority for an agency to dispose of them.
     

  3. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Unreconstructed

    1,704
    0
    Jun 20, 2004
    Mississippi, CSA
    Thanks, Ox. I know that evidence in gun related crimes gets kept (basically forever).

    But I believe that lots of other "recovered" guns get siphoned off and end up in private hands. Guns are confiscated, but the owner never charged, or pleads guilty to a lesser crime and the gun never gets returned.

    I have known people who knew a sheriff or policeman and they could get you a gun cheap.

    I also suspect that how it gets handled depends upon what city/county you are in.

    And I wonder just how "public" (competitive) these auctions to FFL dealers are. Anybody we know who bids on these auctions? I read legal notices pretty closely and I have never seen a notice of such an auction.

    Even when they sell them to an FFL, I suspect there is an inside deal to a friendly FFL guy.

    Besides, some guns have to be in unserviceable condition and some are recovered stolen property.

    Unless they get rid of some guns, they must have guns coming out of their ears. This story ran recently about the Jackson police. Seems there was "confusion" the first time they answered. They first reported 282 guns confiscated since 2002. Then they revised it to 5,017. That's a big difference:

     
  4. OXCOPS

    OXCOPS

    13,045
    1
    Dec 31, 2000
    AZ

    I have personally witnessed (and signed off on the proper forms) a handful of unrepairable weapons be destroyed. Usually, they are taken to the city's vehicle garage, where a tech puts a torch, or saw to them. They are "worked over" just enough to make them completely beyond repair (which isn't hard considering their condition). Then, they are tossed in the scrap metal bin with tons of other scrap.

    As for those recovered, or taken from someone not charged, they are held like any other gun in evidence. If the gun is taken as part of an arrest, but no gun charges, that firearm is logged into property. Once the owner bonds out, they can come show proof of ownership, then claim their firearm.

    If it is taken WITH gun charges, then it requires an order from a judge for us to release it back to the owner. Some people just don't take the effort to get that court order.

    Many, many years ago (30+), a judge would transfer possession of the weapon to the arresting officer, if they wanted it. Almost a "spoils of war" type of thing.

    As far as contracting with an FFL, the only time I have ever known my old PD to do it was to place them in their shop on consignment. How they picked that particular FFL, I don't know, but I do know they sent out letters to all the FFLs inside the city limits asking if they wanted to submit a bid.