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Heater not heating....

Discussion in 'Car Forum' started by W Turner, Oct 9, 2006.


  1. W Turner

    W Turner
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    Mar 1, 2000
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    Location:
    Hillsboro, AL
    My wife has a 1992 Ford Ranger with the 3.0L V6. We are selling this thing as soon as possible, but this morning she was driving to work and the heater was very slow to warm up. She also told me (for the first time) that it did not heat well, if at all for most of last winter.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks,

    Bull
     

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  2. NotAMonte86

    NotAMonte86
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    So it does eventually heat up? Hmm...

    Thermostat stuck open?
     

  3. F-6

    F-6
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    Is the blower motor not blowing air, or is it blowing air, just not warm air?

    If the blower motor is blowing cold air, make sure the radiator is full of antifreeze. If the coolant level is way low or if the waterpump is not working, the heater would not work, but the engine would also be overheating, which I would hope she would have noticed so I doubt that is the case. Plus if it did it all last winter, you probably would have fried the engine by now.

    It could also be the thermostat is stuck open, which would not let your engine warm up. Usually when the thermostat goes bad, it sticks shut, making your engine overheat, but I have seen them stick open. Drive around and watch the temp guage. It should begin climbing fairly soon, then reach a point (usually 175 - 190 degrees) when it levels off. If you happen to be looking at the guage at the exact time the thermostat opens, the temp will actually drop suddenly then climb back and level off. If it takes a long time for the temp to come up or if it doesn't come up at all, the thermostat is stuck open.

    But, more than likely, the heater core is plugged up or just plain bad. Check to see if it looks like it is leaking at all. Have you ever used any stop-leak in the radiator? Alot of times that stuff will plug the heater core.
     
  4. W Turner

    W Turner
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    Nope, never used any stop leak in the radiator.

    She says it's blowing and it will warm up eventually, but it takes a long time. She said that it will warm up on warm-er days, but on cold days it never warms up, or if it does, it is minimal.

    Where is the heater core in these trucks?
     
  5. nsb22

    nsb22
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    TEAM OAF

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    With you saying what you just said, I would check your thermostat first! Under $10.00 and less than 10 minutes of work to change it out! Way cheaper and easier than the heater core!


    I've never worked on a ranger before, but on S-10s the heater core is under/behind the glove box!

    Good luck friend!
     
  6. BPMACMAN

    BPMACMAN
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    did you ever check the coolant level ?? not in the tank but in the rad itself. allow to cool 1st........
     
  7. ecmills

    ecmills
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    I shoot guns.

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    They're on the right track.

    Step one is to check the coolant level. Pop the radiator cap after it has sat overnight - don't just look in the overflow jug. I bet it will be fine.

    Then you'll want to replace the thermostat if that's okay. Start with the cheapest, easiest things to replace that are likely the source of the problem, not the hardest and most expensive. The fact that a sugary coolant smell isn't noticeable inside, along with leaking fluid on the carpet or below the vehicle, and it DOES blow hot air in some circumstances, make the heater core unlikely. It's apparently neither clogged or leaking.

    The thermostat will stay closed until the coolant in the engine & heater core gets warm, so the water pump pushes water through the system - but NOT the radiator. Once the coolant is up to temperature, the bi-metallic thermostat will open, allowing coolant to flow through the radiator and keeping the temps under control.

    If the thermostat is stuck open (very likely since they're failure prone even IF you regularly change your coolant every 2 years like you're supposed to, which most don't) it will allow the cold air flowing through the radiator to immediately begin cooling off the already ice-cold coolant circulating through the block and heater core - so it takes FOREVER to warm up on cold days.

    Cheap fix. Thermostat, gasket/o-ring, and jug of antifreeze will set you back less than $20 total. It's even right on top of the motor and easy to get to. :)
     
  8. ecmills

    ecmills
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    I shoot guns.

    Joined:
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    All you'll need to fix the thermostat is one wrench the right size for these two bolts. The part labeled 'water outlet connector' is where the upper radiator hose connects to the engine. Pretty hard to miss. ;)

    [​IMG]
     
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