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Gun Oils and Bore Cleaners

Discussion in 'Band of Glockers' started by eug3n3_d3nn1s, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. eug3n3_d3nn1s

    eug3n3_d3nn1s

    106
    0
    Mar 27, 2008
    Aside from redisol and wd40, what brands do you use that are usually sold here in Manila?

    What are the pros and cons of different oils and cleaners?

    Thanks
     
  2. wtf jack

    wtf jack

    277
    0
    Sep 1, 2007
    If you can find CLP Breakfree, use it. That is what I use, and that is what the most battle-tested armed forces in the world uses.

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    MILITARY REQUIREMENTS

    To increase reliability and performance to reduce misfires
    and malfunctions in various military weapons, the U.S. Army issued in 1971 a "purchase description"--PD-48-- listing the performance properties of a single, ulti-purpose product to clean, lubricate and protect weaponry. These included, in broad terms, the following requirements:

    1. It must easily remove firing residue, carbon deposits and other contaminants during the cleaning process, and prevent the rapid buildup of subsequent deposits during firing which cause malfunctions and weapon failure.

    2. It must lubricate moving parts, including those which bear a heavy load, and it must continue to lubricate over long periods of time and use. At the same time it must not be sticky or greasy so as to attract dust, sand or dirt which would cause malfunctions. As a weapons lubricant it must
    function under all conditions - extreme heat or cold, in mud, water, dust, etc.

    3. As a corrosion preventative it must protect the weapon and preserve it in a "grab-and-go" condition in all climatic conditions - high humidity, rain, snow, etc., and it must protect the weapon against corrosion in field use, even in
    extreme conditions such as salt water environments.

    The requirements were so severe that PD-48 became known as the "impossible specification," and from 1971 nothing was found to come even close to meeting its requirements, until BREAK-FREE CLP was introduced.

    The U.S. Military began testing BREAK-FREE CLP in 1976 and for almost three years it carried out test after test in the laboratories and in the field on weapons of all types from the M16 rifle to 8 inch artillery howitzers, until finally, in 1979, it was completely satisfied that BREAK-FREE CLP not only met the "impossible specification," but even exceeded its requirements.


    MIL-L-63460

    The U.S. Military then created a new cleaning, lubricating
    and protection specification, MIL-L-63460, (largely based on PD-48 and the exceptional performance of BREAK-FREE CLP), which set out new and extremely high performance requirements for a single product cleaner, lubricant and preservative and the test methods by which to evaluate its performance.

    BREAK-FREE CLP was approved by the U.S. Military to the MIL-L-63460 specification, and since that time has been continuously used as the primary maintenance product by the U.S. Army, Navy and U.S. Air Force for cleaning, lubricating and preserving all weapons...tanks, mortars, rifles, machine guns, or guns on battleships.

    Since their introduction, MIL-L-63460 and BREAK-FREE CLP
    have become recognized by Militaries around the world as the standards by which to ensure the maximum performance and protection of weapons and weapon systems, and both have been adopted by 20 countries throughout the free world, including NATO, which has given the specification the NATO number S-758.
     


  3. cebuboy

    cebuboy toy soldier

    1,194
    0
    Apr 27, 2004
    Cebu
    Try slip2000, I like it better than breakfree.
     
  4. edtf

    edtf

    2,172
    0
    Oct 10, 2007
    QC
    Is break free a dry lube?
    FYI to Phil based people: I saw some in stronghand before.
     
  5. isuzu

    isuzu

    4,072
    0
    Jul 3, 2005
    North America
  6. eug3n3_d3nn1s

    eug3n3_d3nn1s

    106
    0
    Mar 27, 2008
    cebuboy and isuzu:

    now, where could you buy those oils?

    To all:

    It seems that CLP breakfree is kinda hard to find. am i right?
     
  7. cebuboy

    cebuboy toy soldier

    1,194
    0
    Apr 27, 2004
    Cebu
    Slip2000 is hard to find here, had to beg a relative to bring some for me.

    Breakfree CLP is available in major gun stores like Twin Pines, Stronghand, APL etc.
     
  8. isuzu

    isuzu

    4,072
    0
    Jul 3, 2005
    North America
    Just as Cebuboy said, Break Free is available at Twin Pines. I also used that on my former Glocks. What's good is that it never dries up. It cleans what WD 40 and kerosene can't.

    Fluid Film, white lithium grease and Super Lube is good for the M-14's bolt and operating rod. White lithium grease does a good job and is very cost-effective.

    Lucas Gun Oil might be available at automotive performance shops that sells Lucas products.
     
  9. BrassKnuckle

    BrassKnuckle

    345
    0
    Mar 2, 2008
    I also swear by Break Free. It is usually available at Twin Pines as suggested by Isuzu. Just a little goes a looong way. Another good one is the old US military LSA Weapons Oil that used to be available in the PX shops in Dau. That however is just a lubricant and doesn't protect metal surfaces the way Break Free does.

    For slide rails, bolts, and other bearing surfaces I use TW25 grease. I only use Hoppe's to clean my bores.

    I'd be careful using WD40 on guns, specially blued ones. I heard that it can cause the bluing to fade somewhat. I never confirmed if this was true, but I decided to play it safe anyway.

    Also remember that too much lubricant can be a bad thing.
     
  10. wtf jack

    wtf jack

    277
    0
    Sep 1, 2007
  11. cebuboy

    cebuboy toy soldier

    1,194
    0
    Apr 27, 2004
    Cebu
    well for the glock, it just runs with whatever you put on it, heck it even runs without lube.

    the M16 is another story, in our neck of the woods, it runs well dripping wet.
     
  12. Shell Helix as a lubricant is good but I forgot the viscosity number that works best with guns.

    Get the smallest can of Helix you can get ; otherwise you will have it lying around for years.