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Funeral Director/ Mortuary Services

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Averageman, Dec 5, 2012.

  1. Averageman

    Averageman

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    My Son is interested in a Career.
    I have done the search just interested in your experiances.
    Thanks
    A/M
     
  2. *ASH*

    *ASH* in hell everyone loves popcorn

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    only experiences ive had is bad ones, i only see them when someone in my family dies

    i know one thing i had no idea the schooling and medical school stuff one has to go thru .


    long ago i dated a girl ,her dad ran a funeral home , they lived upstairs , always creeped me out , still does . and i feel bad for that one time we made the two - back beast in one of his coffins :embarassed::embarassed:
     

  3. debbert

    debbert

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    Many years ago, I thought about going into the mortuary business. During my investigation, I found out that between the schooling (the same courses as doctors take), plus the apprenticeships, etc... it took just as long to become a mortician, to take care of the dead, as it did to become a doctor, to take care of the living.

    I didn't think that that was right, so I never pursued it after that. Sometimes I wished that I would have, as it is a job that has pretty good security. People are always dying to do business with you.
     
  4. jp3975

    jp3975

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    Id advise him to become a nurse instead. If he becomes an RN, he can do the traveling nurse thing. Up to $100 an hour. Ive seen small towns do $50 an hour, 7 days on and 7 off.

    There's not much money in that field unless you own your own funeral home.

    Depending on where you live, average pay is 30k and its an Associate degree.

    Its an interesting job. But he probably wont have a lot of extra cash doing it.
     
  5. Rabbi

    Rabbi The Bombdiggity Lifetime Member

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    It seems like most everyone in the industry is a salesman (prepaid funeral and when it happens) Some of them seem to do rather well. like the 80-120K lifestyle.

    I would assume, given that there are not really very many funeral homes per capita, that being the actual guy in charge of any given location (The Director) is probably a pretty hard job to come by. I would also bet it is a 6 figure job in most cases.

    As for the people who actually prep the bodies, perhaps there is some room there...but again, it seems like most everyone in that industry (and it stands to reason) is a salesman, no matter what title they use.
     
  6. jp3975

    jp3975

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    Its an associate degree plus two year apprenticeship which is paid.

    If he started working at a funeral home while in school he would be working on his apprenticeship while in school. So you could become a mortician in as little as 2 years if you work hard.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  7. Rabbi

    Rabbi The Bombdiggity Lifetime Member

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    I find that highly implausible.

    It take 8 years to even get the MD/DO title, then it takes another 3-7 to become a "type" of doctor and another 1-3 years after that if you wish to subspecialize. All of this and you have not even taken your board certification(s) yet....and much of this, every week, for years is over 80 hours. So it is double the training years.

    So, for Doctors, 12 years minimum...for most longer. A real quick googling shows that State requirments for Morticians very but in most places a bachelor’s degree is more than enough.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  8. debbert

    debbert

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    That may be true, now. Back in the day, it added up to about 8 years when you factored in the schooling and the apprenticeships. I don't know if this changes anything but I was considering the job of the guy that handled the bodies and did the makeup and such... I wasn't looking at the front office position.
     
  9. SPIN2010

    SPIN2010 Searching ...

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    I would steer him waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay clear of that profession, as it is pretty hard to make a living off of "$500.00" cremations as in ground burial disappears completely.

    Only for the Mortuary Technician side (embalming), Funeral Director is a BS degree in most states now (... but there are several that do not even require a degree i.e. CO)

    P.S. With mortuary school and PA (Phys Asst) school I was looking at five years max down at UK (but I had two other degrees to use as credit enhancers). I am sure it is about two years more without college credit to apply.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  10. debbert

    debbert

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    Here ya go: http://www.ehow.com/how_10074171_become-mortician-ohio.html
     
  11. Rabbi

    Rabbi The Bombdiggity Lifetime Member

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    So my thoughts were right, it is not near as long as becoming a doctor. It takes 5 years (4 year degree + 1 year certificate program) Then you have up to 18 months to complete an apprenticeship.

    Again, to be a Medical Doctor

    8 years of school.

    If you get to count the apprenticeship, doctors get to count post graduate training.

    3-7 years residency (80+ hours a week, so that is 6-14 years of training hours)

    1-3 years fellowship (again 80 or more hours a week in most cases)

    Then your boards.

    There are few professions that require as long a training process as becoming a board certified doctor in the U.S.

    You also picked a State (Ohio) with some of the longest requirments, most have less. Doctors have the same training requirments in every State.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  12. debbert

    debbert

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    I did not post this to cause a debate. I also want to point out that when I was considering this, it was almost 30 years ago. Things have definitely changed since then.

    Perhaps I should have said "almost as many years as a doctor."

    I also picked Ohio because I am a lifelong resident of Ohio.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  13. jp3975

    jp3975

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    You get schooled for both funeral director and embalmer. Although some people choose not to take the embalming courses and just want to direct.

    I went to school for it 07-09.

    I cant imagine it ever took that long. Really, you could learn to do it easily without ever going to school. In fact, you dont have to go to school in one state. I think its CO if i recall correctly.

    All that it really is, is basics like comp, algebra, speech, etc, and Anatomy I/II, thanatochemistry, microbiology/pathology, embalming, funeral history, psyc, sociology, etc.

    I dont think theres any way to stretch it that long.
     
  14. Rabbi

    Rabbi The Bombdiggity Lifetime Member

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    I still dont see how 6.5 years( at the most) is almost 11 years (at the very least)
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  15. Dubble-Tapper

    Dubble-Tapper

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    he wants to be a mortician? have any neighborhood pets come up missing lately?

    just kidding, that was mean.


    honestly, my best friend dad was a funeral director/mortician when we were growing up. he ran the whole operation, pick up, prep, embalming, cremation, sales, family grief counseling, all that.

    he made good money, but that career caused him many issues with depression and it really changed the dude. you have to be a certain type of person to deal with death for a living.
     
  16. jp3975

    jp3975

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    Not around here. 2 year course and you're qualified to be an embalmer/funeral director.

    I cant fathom why director is a bs. Different states i guess.

    Mine was in AR and i could take a simple board exam to be qualified in LA or TX. Its a two year degree in all three states.
     
  17. debbert

    debbert

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    In any event, I wish your son the best with whatever decision he makes, averageman. Regardless of the number of years for schooling and apprenticeships (30 years ago), I couldn't reconcile the amount of schooling that it took to prepare dead people for a funeral with the amount of schooling that it took to take care of living people. At the time, it was a considerable choice for me, regardless of how Rabbi wants to dissect it.

    At times, I regret that I didn't go through with it.

    The funeral business these days is a conglomerate. Very few, if any independent funeral directors or funeral home businesses exist anymore. You son should take that into consideration as well.
     
  18. DaneA

    DaneA

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    I would support him fully if I were you. People will be dying to see him after he gets out of school. Although it seems to me that business would always be dead. Tough choice.
     
  19. jp3975

    jp3975

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    To the op...

    Since there is disagreement here as to how long it takes...google "funeral program [your state]" and then call them and ask.

    Takes two years in LA/AR/TX.

    I would advise him to chose another field though, as there isnt much money in it if you work for someone else. If he wants to own a place...you can become rich doing that, but its a lot of work and money to get there.
     
  20. debbert

    debbert

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    :agree: