close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Welcome to Glock Talk

Why should YOU join our Glock forum?

  • Converse with other Glock Enthusiasts
  • Learn about the latest hunting products
  • Becoming a member is FREE and EASY

If you consider yourself a beginner or an avid shooter, the Glock Talk community is your place to discuss self defense, concealed carry, reloading, target shooting, and all things Glock.

For the grapplers

Discussion in 'The Martial Arts Forum' started by gr81disp, Apr 11, 2005.

  1. gr81disp

    gr81disp Bushbot v1.0

    474
    0
    Sep 19, 2004
    Marietta, GA
    What is your favorite way to make someone let go of their arm when blocking an armbar? I personally prefer the bicep slicer, or the foot to the bicep. I asked this because I think we need more technique questions.
     
  2. Roundeyesamurai

    Roundeyesamurai Sensei Member

    543
    0
    Jul 15, 2004
    Upstate New York
    There really isn't a 'trick' to anything- do it, and do it, and do it some more, and you'll find the solution which works best for you.

    To be a little aiki about it, though- if he's resisting your application of a technique, try going to the opposite technique. For instance, if he's resisting his arm being pulled down, then pull his arm up.
     


  3. BlackBelt

    BlackBelt

    243
    0
    Aug 23, 2000
    Lots of variables=lots of solutions.
    I'm partial to arm nerve strikes, or punching him in the face, as long as it doesn't mean giving up control of his trapped arm. Depending on which arm I've got, sometimes I can just flip over onto my side or stomach, and the pressure will cause him to release, and I can finish the arm bar.
    Oddly enough, it was this very same technique that finished my NHB ring fighting several years ago. I was fighting in the open weight class (I was 5'11"- 185 lbs...now at 162 lbs) and drew a card against this huge brute. The guy was 6'6"- 327 lbs, and all but about 5 lbs of that was muscle. I had watched this guy DEMOLISH 2 other guys in fights before mine. I knew I couldn't out box or out kick him, because he was fast and good. He dropped bombs like Hiroshima. You didn't want to get hit even once by this guy, or it was 'lights out'.
    So, like every good BJJ student, I went to the clinch, and easily got him in my guard. Right at the one minute mark, I saw my opening and went for the arm bar. This guy had such huge guns that I couldn't quite get it locked in. So I hip-swiveled to the left and tugged on that arm. The next thing I knew, this guy picked me up, with me still hanging onto that arm bar (because I KNEW I had it locked in, and he would be tapping any second now...) and he 'stacked me up'--with my neck going straight down into the mat. I heard some crunchy noise in my spine that I knew was going to suck, but I still had that arm bar. Then he picked me up AGAIN, and this time not only stacked me up, but threw his entire body weight on top of it, cracking my neck. I literally couldn't move or breathe, but I managed to tap out.
    It was weeks before I got everything back moving correctly. I decided not to arm bar anybody who's arm was bigger than my waist ever again.
     
  4. gr81disp

    gr81disp Bushbot v1.0

    474
    0
    Sep 19, 2004
    Marietta, GA
    Oops, my bad, wasn't clear enough. In this case, I was talking about an armbar on the ground. Been training so long, I forgot you can do one standing. ;f

    An example can be found here. (video)

    http://www.theultimatefighter.tv/training.php?vid=2

    When one attempts to lock this in, many times your opponent will lock his hands together so you cannot extend the arm, blocking it. This is bad when you attempt an armbar on someone with a strong grip or is alot bigger than you. I prefer to either place my foot on his opposite bicep and put pressure on (since the legs are a lot stronger than the arms) or perform a bicep slicer, in which my leg towards his feet crosses over his arm I am trying to armbar, shin to forearm, and my other leg goes over my foot, back of knee to ankle. I place my forearm in the crook of his elbow, then pull on his arm while bridging my hips up and pressing my feet down. This means that his elbow is trying to close over my forearm, which is EXTREMELY painful and he either submits, lets go of his hand (giving me the armbar again) or I break his elbow (not in practice of course).

    Sorry I wasn't being clear enough.
     
  5. gr81disp

    gr81disp Bushbot v1.0

    474
    0
    Sep 19, 2004
    Marietta, GA
    BB, why did you not grab his leg to prevent the pick up, or was he too fast/strong? I have to admit, at about 250, I don't have to worry too much about this, so my experience is limited.

    PS, Wanna see a real David v. Goliath, PM me and I will send you a highlight reel of Minotauro v. Sapp. THAT was a beat down with a Rocky ending.
     
  6. ARH

    ARH

    25
    0
    Mar 5, 2002
    Sydney, Australia
    Pull both his arms toward you, as if going for a far armbar. It will not only go around the grip, you're not going to compromise control by trying silly things like shoving the far arm with your foot or otherwise fiddle farting about with your legs..
     
  7. BlackBelt

    BlackBelt

    243
    0
    Aug 23, 2000
    gr81disp, I knew that I had the arm bar, and I had never had anyone get up from that position before. It took both of my arms to keep his huge arm pinned to my chest. I didn't even realize that he was picking me up until it was too late. I had lot's of fights before that, but every now and then I run into that one guy that makes me put my white belt back on as they take me to school...
     
  8. gr81disp

    gr81disp Bushbot v1.0

    474
    0
    Sep 19, 2004
    Marietta, GA
    ARH, I actually feel completely in control unless I am doing an armbar from the guard, in which case, I have a hard enough time just doing the armbar!
     
  9. Joshua M. Smith

    Joshua M. Smith Shootist

    126
    0
    Mar 17, 2005
    Wabash IN
    Have you tried chain locking? You might not get the armbar you want... but you'll get an arm bar of some sort.

    Josh <><
     
  10. ARH

    ARH

    25
    0
    Mar 5, 2002
    Sydney, Australia
    If the guy is good, he'll be able to start spinning out of the armbar once you move one of your legs. If you keep your heels locked and simply pull both arms toward you, you keep better control plus there will be no advantage of clasping at his own hands.
     
  11. gr81disp

    gr81disp Bushbot v1.0

    474
    0
    Sep 19, 2004
    Marietta, GA
    Once again, my bad, not clear enough. I meant from mount, but thanks for the suggestion from the guard, I have to try that.
     
  12. gr81disp

    gr81disp Bushbot v1.0

    474
    0
    Sep 19, 2004
    Marietta, GA
    Then how will he spin? Do you mean he stacks you? Or do you mean he spins his legs out? If that is the case, I have never had that happen to me, I guess because, A) I don't use this move much B) I stay close to his body when I do, giving less room to move.
     
  13. Ironeagle74

    Ironeagle74

    32
    0
    Jan 11, 2005
    He's talking about the text book arm bar escape of rolling in the direction of ure opposite arm, onto ure side, then to ure knees. He can also escape by getting the leg off his head which is easy to do if he has both arms locked and he is strong. Pulling both arms toward you is a good move, but if the guy is really strong you can have a hard time with that too. I like the bicep slicer along with somekind of pulling on the wrist too.
     
  14. scottsummers

    scottsummers

    15
    0
    May 1, 2005
    seattle
    use your other foot to kick them in the face. You cant really get many locks unless you soften someone up first.
     
  15. Fedaykin

    Fedaykin

    21
    0
    May 5, 2005
    Hawaii
    Assume you are going for an armbar from the mount on your opponent's left arm. He grips his hands together using a mountain climber grip (hands facing one another with fingers curled into a "j" shape around fingers of opposite arm). I generally use the following techniques in this order:

    (1) Make sure your that knees are squeezed tightly together to isolate the upper arm and that you are pulling in with your heels on his head and ribs to keep him down. Keep your right arm hugged around his biceps and vigorously slap the back of his left hand with your left hand to break the grip. Immediately figure four your hands, keeping your left hand on his left hand and your right hand on your left forearm. Sit back and pull the wrist into you for a painful wrist lock. Many people extend their arm to avoid the lock and put themselves back into the armbar.

    (2) If 1 doesn't work, try this. Keep your right arm hugged around his biceps, grab his left wrist with your left hand, and figure 4 your right arm on your right wrist. Hug your elbows in to your sides and pull his arm towards your center. Now, virgourously wrench the arm from side to side, first towards his feet, and then hard towards his head. This will usually break his grip so that you can bar.

    (3) Finally... Do the biceps cutter with your left foot (the body-side foot). Do not use the right (head-side) foot, as it will allow your opponent to sit up into your guard. If pushing on the biceps as you sit back isn't enough to break the grip, move your left foot from his biceps, under his clasped hands, to the area between his right shoulder and neck. Let him sit up (most people will be trying to do so anyway). If he does, you will have bypassed his right arm and set him up for a triangle choke.

    Certainly, there are at least a dozen other techniques to use here, but these are the three I use the most in sparring.

    Temet nosce,
    Fedaykin.