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Father needs to limit wifi router to kids

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by duncan, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    25,930
    1,157
    Jan 26, 2001
    Indiana
    Friends that will hand out passwords?
     
  2. Or the ability to tether or hot spot from a phone or tablet?
     


  3. gemeinschaft

    gemeinschaft AKA Fluffy316

    2,202
    57
    Feb 7, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Duncan, while I can understand your concern, I know that I have spent many nights working late because that is the only time that I can find where people leave me alone.

    I'd be interested in hearing about what he is programming. The fact is, technology is running at such a fast pace that by the time there are college courses to teach programming skills, they are outdated. Learning by doing is a must for anyone who wants to succeed in IT and he may be on his way towards making big strides, but you gotta start somewhere.

    My buddy's 16 y/o son is paying for college on his own via an app that he wrote in High School for the iPhone... Can you imagine? Wish I would have done that.
     
  4. Tvov

    Tvov

    4,527
    340
    Sep 30, 2000
    CT,USA
    We had hard wired online access only for years, up until maybe two years ago. Kids computers were in the kitchen eating area, the only place I gave them online access. We could always see what they were doing, and they almost always went to bed (and off computers) before I did. Now that we have wireless, out of habit they still do all their online work in the kitchen.

    My son does online gaming a lot, and that has translated into him working on making custom maps for games, and making his "own" games by modifying existing games (legally! Various online PC games provide the ability to mod the games). Involves programming and using various graphics programs. He will probably be bored with the initial "college level" courses.

    Good luck on working this out with your kids. At a minimum, I always insisted that my kids got up in the morning on time (for whatever was going on), and had good grades in school. If they couldn't get up on their own, then they simply had to go to bed earlier, until they could. If grades were slipping, they worked on homework instead of playing on the computer. I do feel that proper sleep is needed for school. No electronics in bedrooms, unless they were doing homework.

    It seems to have worked out for us... but it was rarely "easy"! Especially these days, where if you try to limit your kids, or God forbid punish them, you are open to charges of child endangerment and/or a visit from the state child welfare office.
     
  5. wrenrj1

    wrenrj1

    6,916
    195
    May 22, 2002
    Huskerville
    Do they have day jobs for the summer? Are they fulfilling any duties, responsibilities etc. that they have or what you ask them to do? If they're generally responsible and good kids, personally I wouldn't worry about their internet use or when they use it. Sounds like they are pretty smart kids.

    Saying that, if they are irresponsible for not obeying your direction as a parent, that would require consequences. Guess you need to decide.
     
  6. steve1988

    steve1988

    1,595
    26
    Feb 5, 2009
    Ft. Meade, MD
    I would like to add my voice to those who are saying "let him program." I understand your concern, but if he is spending that time programming, then he is learning a great skill that he can use later in life to make pretty good money. I look upon people who program without pay to learn the same as I look upon people who are in school for other things. Obviously, no one is paying you to go to school, but the future benefits are far more valuable than trying to get a job without education. Pulling a few all-nighters, as long as he is living up to his other responsibilities will probably help much more than it will hurt.