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Fast Handling Shotgun

Discussion in 'Tactical Shotguns' started by JBJ16, Mar 12, 2010.


  1. JBJ16

    JBJ16
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    For me a conventional fixed stock shotgun feels and handles faster than one with the pistol grip and stock. At least with the Mossberg 590A1 and 88 Maverick I borrowed and tested.

    I was shooting multiple poppers at 10-15yds, and also IPSC boards.

    YMMV, can you share your experience?
    :cool:

    ETA: Lets limit this to pump action shotguns
     
    #1 JBJ16, Mar 12, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010
  2. bikerdog

    bikerdog
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    I think it might depend on the type of pistol grip stock your using. I have 2 remington 870's, one with a standard stock with a shortened LOP and one with a speedfeed solid stock again with a shortened LOP. I found that the speedfeed for me at least handles a little faster. but it might be to because I train a lot with an M4 and the pistol grip just feels more like the M4.
     

  3. Murgatroy

    Murgatroy
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    I think it would have more to do with what you are used to and train with.

    I know you asked to go with pumps only, but...

    I grew up with a double barrel shotgun, 18" BBL. I carried this gun a million times and using it became as natural to me as breathing. It was an old 'coach' gun that my father had bought for CAS when I was young and it got handed down to me. Low comb, straight grip with just a slight curve of a pistol grip. It was light, easy to maneuver and handle and became what I knew.

    When the time came for a HD shotgun, I bought a pump. Conventional stock, 18.5" BBL. Overall weight and length are the same as the SxS I grew up using (and still have in the closet) and as such, it was more of a matter of retraining the controls. Now, instead of 'swing, squeeze, follow through, squeeze, break, pull, load, close, swing, pull...' is is 'swing, squeeze, follow through, pump, squeeze...'

    I have not thought of putting a pistol grip on the pump. It is not what I am familiar with, and I have never tried firing one. I will admit that the thought of one crossed my mind when I first got the pump, but it would lead to unfamiliarity IMO and might cause me issues going from one shotgun to the other. I still regularly use both for different loads.

    The SxS is an old `60s model Rossi Coach Gun, and the pump is an NEF Pardner Protector.
     
    #3 Murgatroy, Mar 13, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2010
  4. Brucev

    Brucev
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    A couple of Saturday's ago I went quail hunting with some friends. One bird is not so hard to hit, but two or three as they rise is tough. I use a Rem. 870. It shucks shells like water going over a water fall. Of course it has the plain field stock. But it seems that if such a configuration works so well on moving targets like multiple birds, it would be effective for any other use. JMHO. Sincerely. Brucev.
     
  5. JBJ16

    JBJ16
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    ^ ^ ^ that makes a lot of sense. FWIW in videos I have seen, the IPSC champs I saw were using conventional stock shotguns.

    I know in IPSC, speed/the least time to finish a run is a premium. :cool: