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Emergency Reload

Discussion in 'Tactics and Training' started by PhoenixTacSolutions, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. Hello Ladies & Gents,

    Here's a video we did on the emergency reload:

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtYmU85iN0k&list=UUvlYETI8slSogGgZbbev6Jw&index=8&feature=plcp"]YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.[/ame]

    BTW, when inserting the magazine into the handgun, sometimes I give it a very quick glance and sometimes I keep my eyes on the threat (versatility is a bonus)...as follows:

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XsPUDufTfM&list=UUvlYETI8slSogGgZbbev6Jw&index=2&feature=plcp"]YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.[/ame]

    This is just MY way of doing it. Find out what works for you and evolve.

    My wife edited the above video (2nd) and insists that "Hell's Bells" is a good track for it. :)

    Will post engagements from concealment soon.

    Thanks in advance for watching!
    __________________
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2012

  2. talon

    talon

    1,022
    78
    Jun 10, 2001
    Dallas,Tx,USA
    IMHO, this method works for multiple systems is not a strong point.(weak hand slide release)

    Pick glocks, stick with them, and you will be better off.
     
  3. Please elaborate...don't quite understand what you mean.

    To clarify my position, I said that for me, the support hand thumb provides a more positive engagement of the slide stop and that it also works for other handguns especially 1911s (since the slide stop can not be reached by your firing hand thumb) and serves a one size fits all remedy (all this assuming your handgun has a slide stop). Thanks.

     
  4. talon

    talon

    1,022
    78
    Jun 10, 2001
    Dallas,Tx,USA
    Well personally I would never settle for a one size fits all. I want a custom fit. :)

    For glocks the strong hand is perfectly indexed for a slide release while the weak hand seats the mag.

    Why would you ask your weak hand to seat the mag and then acquire an index for a slide release ?
     
  5. Thanks for watching!

    Not advocating a one size fits all technique in any way. In the video, I mentioned that my firing hand thumb can't quite achieve a solid purchase on the slide stop (and I don't run extended slide stops on any handgun).

    As such, for me, it makes more sense to use my support hand thumb. The bonus is that I can use the same technique on any handgun that has a slide stop (especially 1911s which require support hand thumb manipulation of the slide stop).

    Some advocate the overhand rack as a one size fits all...for me that is way too slow. Find what works best for you and evolve.

    BTW, as I seat the magazine my support hand thumb can easily manipulate the slide stop and I have a more positive engagement thereof.

    Thanks again for your comment!

     
  6. threefeathers

    threefeathers Scouts Out

    1,358
    11
    Oct 23, 2008
    Southwest
    I find that the great majority of the time I hit the slide release with my grip hand thumb. But I have two exceptions. Taking Tom Givens class I use the overhand method beause Tom scares me.
    Then when wearing gloves and teaching folks who must wear gloves, (19D's) I teach the slingshot because if I use the overhand the gloves are wide enough tha they can boomerang a spent cartridge back into the chamber.
     
  7. Steve in PA

    Steve in PA

    2,318
    27
    Mar 1, 2000
    Pennsylvania
    Overhand, slingshot and slide release all have their places.

    A wise shooter will know how to do all three. Pick the one that works best for you, but know how to do the others as well.