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Dumb question that's been bugging me...

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by cjp85, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. cjp85

    cjp85

    110
    0
    Sep 23, 2004
    San Diego
  2. MrWithasee

    MrWithasee Not playing

    236
    0
    Nov 9, 2005
    Virginia
    I'm sorry I don't know the answer to your question but I have visited sites that do require the www be entered. I also thought it did not matter but I have seen some that it does.
     


  3. Sm0key369

    Sm0key369

    63
    0
    Jun 1, 2005
    Las Vegas, NV
    I type in Glocktalk and then hit Ctrl and enter. Any site I go to I type in the name of it and hit Ctrl Enter.
     
  4. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
    0
    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    It all depends on how the administrator set up the servers and the DNS (domain name resolution). You may have multiple servers in the domain somedomain.com. One of them may be called "ftp". The symbolic address of that server would then be ftp.somedomain.com. Most likely, that would be an ftp server. There may be another server called "www". Then its symbolic address would be www.somedomain.com. That would most likely be the web server. Mind you, behind each symbolic address is a real IP address. Say, our ftp.somedomain.com server resolves to 10.0.0.10, and our www.somedomain.com resolves to 10.0.0.11. Now, what would happen if the admin set it up so that "somedomain.com" also resolved to the same IP address 10.0.0.11? Well, whether you typed www.somedomain.com or somedomain.com, you would hit the same IP address. Since, if you do not specify access method at the beginning, the browser will assume first the http protocol, you will hit port 80 on that machine, and the web server will respond.

    Does that help, or does it muddy it up further? :)
     
  5. MrWithasee

    MrWithasee Not playing

    236
    0
    Nov 9, 2005
    Virginia
     
  6. cjp85

    cjp85

    110
    0
    Sep 23, 2004
    San Diego
    Thank you, it makes sense to me now. So the "www" is just what everyone happens to call their servers? And am I right in asuming that "www" stands for "world wide web"?
     
  7. darth_rifle

    darth_rifle (null)

    55
    3
    Jun 25, 2000
    Metro NYC Area
    Way back in the day people frequently used protocols other than HTTP to get information (Gopher, FTP, Archie, telnet, FTPmail, etc...). It was common practice to name the machine after the service it supplied.

    Now, HTTP is virtually guaranteed to be running on any machine that exposes remote services, and it is usually the only thing people are interested in accessing. There is an assumption that any domain has an associated HTTP (web) server. Therefore, it has become redundant to specify the "www". Additionally, the domain "root" itself will share the same IP address as the web server (and vice versa). whatever.com and www.whatever.com will almost always have the same IP address (load-balancing through DNS excluded).

    HTH (and too tired to explain the mail exchanger record) ;)

    - D. Rifle
     
  8. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    1,426
    0
    Jun 3, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    Absolutely. And, as darth_rifle eloquently explained, it is a matter of tradition. These days it is likely not necessary, but it has been such a simple and elegant convention, most still use it.
     
  9. Furant

    Furant Millennium Member

    441
    0
    Oct 14, 1999
    Roswell, GA
     
  10. Sm0key369

    Sm0key369

    63
    0
    Jun 1, 2005
    Las Vegas, NV
    Oh yeah forgot about the home comp.