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Drought, corn production and food prices

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by tongix, Jul 19, 2012.

  1. tongix

    tongix

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  2. Adjuster

    Adjuster

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    Where is this drought happening? I work in the storm business so all I have been hearing about is severe storms through the midwest, Ohio valley, Texas, Florida etc. etc..


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  3. jason10mm

    jason10mm NRA-GOA-TSRA

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    I'm not buying it. According to this article http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703396604576088010481315914.html?mod=googlenews_wsj 40% of the US corn crop goes to ETHANOL. So why not stop all ethanol production and use that corn for feed and food?

    Now obviously this would cause a 10% gas deficit in the US since ethanol accounts for 10% of our gas. So we would need to come up with 14 billion gallons. But since the energy yield of converting corn to ethanol is so low I'm not sure the math would be that bad. So gas prices might jump 50-60 cents and that would impact goods and services, but wouldn't it be far better for everyone involved (except perhaps, for ethanol refiners)?
     
  4. VELO

    VELO

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    A good friend of mine has lost his corn crop in Kansas for the second year in a row. 104 in Wichita yesterday. No significant rain in the forecast. He tells me his soybeans are next if no rain comes soon.
     
  5. Adjuster

    Adjuster

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    Here in Florida all agriculture is mechanically watered on a daily basis. Do they not do this around the rest of the country?

    [​IMG]


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  6. Dave.1

    Dave.1

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    That's upsetting to hear about your friend, VELO. The farmers will get hit first and the consumers next.

    Adjuster, most of the grain belt depends on the High Plains Aquifer (at least that's what it used to be called) to supplement the rain and stream irrigation. The Aquifer has been vastly depleted over the past decade due to water shortages in rain and runoff.

    Dave
     
  7. VELO

    VELO

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    The vast majority of fields in his area are not irrigated. Completely dependent on mother nature.

    I visited him last year in August. He drove me around all the fields. It was incredible to see what the drought has done there. The crop loss that left the biggest impression on me was the sunflowers. Acres and acres and acres of sunflowers all dried up with their heads bent down as if they were mourning.

    I'm a total city slicker and it was a real eye-opener to actually drive around and see what "drought" really means.
     
  8. airmotive

    airmotive Tin Kicker

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    Irrigating the farmland in Iowa would pretty much mean irrigating all of Iowa. Ditto Kansas, Nebraska etc....

    You're also talking different crops...citrus versus grains and beans. Besides, I thought most of the irrigating in FL was done more for freeze prevention, not irrigation. Might be wrong, but....
     
  9. marlinfan

    marlinfan

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    :rofl:
     
  10. minnshooter

    minnshooter

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    I live in in southern minnesota and we have had less than a 1/2 of rain since the end of may. Meat prices will be affected but not in the short term, mopst of the farmers will slaughter the animals and create a slug of beef available after that I would expect prices to rise.

    Most of the ethanol plants have either shutdown or backed down production significantly with high corn prices. They are finally finding out that ethanol isnt as profitable as it once was. Fine with me, I wish they would all close their doors.

    Very little of the midwest is irrigated.
     
  11. Lethaltxn

    Lethaltxn

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    Ahhh, ethanol.
    Because why wouldn't you want to use more fuel to do the same amount of work?
    It's for the environment after all.
     
  12. failsafe

    failsafe

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    I am right here in the middle of an area , that has had near or over 100 degree temps for going on three weeks..The forecast is the same for 7days ..
    During the last 3 weeks, I have had 1" of rainfall...I am a homeowner, not a farmer, but I drive past corn fields that are toast...Everything is brown and crunchy, just like my lawn..
    I am not even sure what the corn crop could be used for..Would a burnt up crop even be good for sileage ?
    FYI, I am located just south of KC MO..
    As we speak it is 103 at 1:30 pm central and not a cloud in sight..:faint:
     
  13. Adjuster

    Adjuster

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    Although we grow everything down here I am most familiar with our tomato and strawberry crops and they get watered daily. Most out of staters don't realize that once you get in from the coast of Florida by a couple miles we turn very rural and agricultural. In fact our biggest export from this state is beef by far over citrus. At one time our biggest export was aquarium fish. Tampa International Airports largest income earner is still the transporting of live aquarium fish.



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  14. captainstormy

    captainstormy

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    I live in Columbus Ohio. We have had a few very strong storms in the past two months. I've lost power due to them 3 times this summer.

    They are mostly wind and lightning/thunder. Some rain but not enough. I saw on the news yesterday that we are at less than half our yearly rainfall average. Top that with one of the hottest summers on record and it gets even worse.

    The only good news is we had a much wetter winter than normal so it could be much worse. Overall water reserves arnt critical, but farmers are hurting. They don't irrigate much here. If they did it would basically mean irrigating the majority of the state outside of the cities. I doubt we have that kind of water reserves sitting around.
     
  15. robertoh

    robertoh

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    Many Ethanol producers are shutting down because at $7.50 to 8.25 today for a bushel of corn they can't make a profit.So much for another (reliable) Green Energy.
     
  16. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    The water still has to come from somewhere.
     
  17. racer11

    racer11

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    Today's temp in Eastern Kansas near Kansas City 105
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2012
  18. racer11

    racer11

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    Out my back door,,,nothing but parched grass, the picture shows more green than there really is. When I walk out in the yard the grass crunches under each step. The corn all around here is done for, I took notice of several large corn fields yesterday just a few miles from me.
     

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  19. Caver 60

    Caver 60

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    Care to enlighten the rest of us. I agree with Dave 1.
     
  20. jame

    jame I don't even know....what I'm doing here....

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    Iowa produces between 20% and 25 % of the nations total corn production, depending on the year.

    While Dave 1. may have a few facts semi-aligned, the thread was started about drought and corn production, and irrigation and aquifer depletion for irrigation don't happen here.

    Our fields are fading fast, with no rain forecast, and triple digit temps expected next week.

    This hasn't ever happened to us. Grandpa (God bless his soul) started farming in 1929, Dad started in 1957, and I started in 1978. We have never produced nothing.

    For us, this really sucks. Not just at a monetary level. It sucks at a self worth level. How can we possibly produce NOTHING?