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Do Glocks benefit from longer bullets?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by MinervaDoe, Aug 23, 2011.


  1. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe
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    I'm just reflecting on a conversation I once had with a fellow shooter. He felt that since Glocks have a high rate of twist in their barrel, that they benefit from firing bullets that are longer. Do you guys think there is any truth to this? :cool:
     

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  2. freakshow10mm

    freakshow10mm
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    Glocks have a pretty standard rate of twist for the given cartridge.
     

  3. Police10-42

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    longer bullet= more drag, you would have to use a lighter load to keep pressure down which would have a lower fps.
     
  4. Boxerglocker

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    Are you talking longer bullets as in OAL or longer bullet as in the projectile only?
     
  5. fredj338

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    Discussing twist rate implies longer/heavier bullets. At least that is how I read it.
    Sure, but again, at handgun vel, you aren't getting any advantage in using long/heavy for caliber bullets going slow, unless you are trying to make low recoiling rounds that still have good accuracy.
     
  6. MinervaDoe

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    So, Glocks actually have a fairly standard rate of twist?
    I guess I'm operating with some false information. That's why I asked.
    Probably just longer & heavier. But, on the theoretical side, I believe that the pure copper bullets are much longer then lead based bullets of the same weight.


    Are the heavier bullets lower recoiling simply because you use less powder?
     
    #6 MinervaDoe, Aug 24, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  7. fredj338

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    True, lighter wt copper bullets will always be longer than lead core bullets of sim wt.
    The lower recoil thing is a matter of getting the heavier bullet to a low enough vel. The heavier bullet gives enough mass to function the slide & as long as vel is kept to that min, recoil is less. A lighter bullet needs higher vel to achieve the same inertia for the slide. At equal vel, the heavier bullet always has more recoil than the lighter bullet. Can't mess with physics.
     
    #7 fredj338, Aug 24, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  8. freakshow10mm

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    Yes, like the .45 ACP is an industry standard 1 in 16 inch twist, I think that's the same for the .40 and 10mm, the 9mm might be 1 in 18 inch twist. A factory barrel is going to be able to handle the spectrum of standard bullet lengths (read: weights). So a Glock .45 ACP will have sufficient rate of twist to accurately shoot bullets from 165gr to 230gr, as that's the most common range of factory ammunition.
     
  9. DWARREN123

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    I believe Glocks are more accurate with bullets that have a longer bearing surface due to the rifling type it has.
     
  10. MinervaDoe

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    Okay, so you've also heard that Glocks are more accurate with longer bullets, and you attribute this to the Polygonal rifling.
    Interesting.
    Thanks for the input.
    My quest for knowledge continues, and I have to wonder how the Polygonal rifling benefits from the longer bearing surface.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygonal_rifling
     
  11. DoctaGlockta

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    I always heard glocks were not accurate because they were made of plastic - it didn't matter what bullet was used.
     
    #11 DoctaGlockta, Aug 24, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  12. Zombie Steve

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    This is correct. I read it in multiple places.






























    (I wrote it down and then I read it, but I believe everything I read). :whistling:
     
  13. DWARREN123

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    The longer bullets usually mean more weight but mine seem to be more accurate with longer bearing surface area bullets or heavier however you wish to state it. This experience comes from thousands of reloaded rounds. This is in 40 S&W and 10mm.
    Others may have different experiences.
     
  14. dkf

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    Yeah but you can take them through a metal detector without setting it off.:rofl:
     
  15. MinervaDoe

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    I believe that there is something to it. Last year, I loaded up 2,000 rounds of 147 grain 9mm and these bullets definitely grouped nearly two inches higher. So, this week, I'm going to see how some heavier Raniers behave in my 10mm with about .5 grain less powder than my 155 grains. i.e. with both weight bullets, I am coaxing the slowest rounds that I can get to cycle the slide.
    If it kicks less, that will be a bonus. :supergrin:
     
    #15 MinervaDoe, Aug 24, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  16. fredj338

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    I think this is generally true of all bullets/barrels if the twist is proper. A longer bullet is just going to stabalize better than a shorter bullet. Again, for most shooters @ most handgun distance, you just won't see the diff.:dunno: